Analyzing Text for Concrete Words and Phrases and Sensory Details | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M2:U2:L6

Analyzing Text for Concrete Words and Phrases and Sensory Details

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • RL.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • W.5.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.5.2a: Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • W.5.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • W.5.9a: Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]").
  • L.5.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • L.5.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can explain how concrete words and phrases and sensory details convey experiences and events precisely. (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5)
  • I can make connections between word choice and purpose. (RL.5.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5)
  • Exit Ticket: Focus Statement (W.5.2a)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

B. Engaging the Reader: Mystery Quotes (15 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Gathering Concrete and Sensory Language (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Concrete and Sensory Language I: Gather concrete and sensory language from your independent reading book (either research or choice) on the note-catcher.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students analyze the concrete words and phrases and sensory details in the excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World that they read closely in Lesson 5 (RL.5.4, RL.5.6, W.5.9, L.5.4, L.5.5).
  • Students also begin to consider a focus statement for the essay that they will begin to write in Lesson 7 to answer the question: "What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?" (W.5.2a)
  • Students who finish quickly or require an extension can expand their search of concrete and sensory language to the final pages of the book after the excerpt on pages 41-42. To do this, students may require an additional Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework helps build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to the rainforest, specifically rainforest species and research. By participating in this volume of reading over time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it. Inviting students to share what they have been learning through independent reading holds them accountable.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is working to become an effective learner. The characteristic they are reminded of specifically is collaboration, as they work in triads to gather concrete and sensory language.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In the previous lesson, students closely read an excerpt from pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. In this lesson, they analyze those same pages, but this time with a focus on the concrete and sensory language.
  • In the first half of the unit, students were introduced to the Explaining Quotes handout and the Explaining Quotes note-catcher that are used in this lesson.
  • Continue to use Goals 1-3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Throughout this lesson, students work in a triad. Strategically group students with at least one strong reader so they can support one another well as they read and analyze the text.

Assessment guidance:

  • Collect students' exit tickets at the end of the lesson and review the focus statements they have generated. Select a few as options for students to use in the next lesson and wordsmith where necessary to make them as clear as possible for students.
  • For ELLs: Collect Language Dive III Practice homework from Lesson 5 for assessment.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 7, students will use the information they have learned and gathered in the close read to begin to plan and write an informational paragraph in response to the question: "What does the author's use of sensory detail and point of view help the reader understand about the rainforest?"

In Advance

  • Prepare the Concrete and Sensory Language strips; copy and cut up enough for one per student.
  • Consider using heterogeneous partnerships for Work Time A.
  • Review the Mystery Quotes protocol (see Classroom Protocols), the Mystery Quotes anchor chart (see supporting materials), and Opening B to familiarize yourself with the way the protocol will work in this lesson.
  • Prepare an upbeat, student friendly track of music for the Mystery Quotes protocol.
  • Post: Learning targets, Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart, and Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: For students who benefit from hearing the text read aloud multiple times, consider using a text-to-speech tool like Natural Reader, SpeakIt! for Google Chrome, or the Safari reader. Note that to use a web-based text-to-speech tool like SpeakIt! or Safari reader, you will need to create an online doc, such as a Google Doc, containing the text.
  • Work Time A: Students complete their note-catcher in a word processing document, for example a Google Doc using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software like Dictation.io.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Students complete their exit ticket online, for example using a Google Form.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.6a, 5.I.B.7, 5.I.C.11a, 5.II.C.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to review an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. This will help prepare them to discuss what concrete language and sensory details help them understand about the rainforest.
  • ELLs may find discussing the Concrete and Sensory Language strips challenging because they will first need to understand the meaning of each strip. Consider discussing, acting out, sketching, and paraphrasing the meaning of some or all of the strips before class so that students can fully participate.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite students to underline relative clauses with [relative pronoun + verb be], like that in the key sentence A chameleon clamps two toes on one side of a stem and three on the other and listens to the soft burr of noise from inside, [which is] the place it cannot see. When they find relative clauses fronted by which + verb be, that + verb be, and who + verb be, they can identify an opportunity for ellipsis by crossing out the relative pronoun + verb be. Example:
  • Biological diversity means the various and different living things that are found within a community.

For heavier support:

  • For Work Time B, consider altering the activity so that one student wears a quote and another student wears the matching description of that quote written on a separate strip. Students mix and mingle, reading quote and description strips and asking questions until they find their match.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation: This lesson extends what students have learned from the previous lesson. They now need to apply it by analyzing how authors use concrete words and phrases and sensory details in the text. It is important to take time to connect students' learning to the previous lesson so that they can activate their prior knowledge (see suggestions in the lesson). This will also help them generalize these skills to this lesson and their own independent reading.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression: During the Mystery Quote activity, some students may benefit from scaffolding the activity for maximized learning. For instance, some students may find it easier to match the description of the quote rather than verbally expressing the description. Additionally, you may consider modifying the note-catcher so that it has lines in the blank boxes to support fine motor skills. You may make additional changes to the note-catcher based on individual needs.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement: Not all students may want to use the modified version of the note-catcher as described in the MMAE section. Consider offering multiple versions of the note-catcher that students can choose from. This helps them to develop self-monitoring skills so they can select tools that are appropriate to support their own learning. Celebrate students for taking ownership of their learning by selecting appropriate tools.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W);

  • concrete words and phrases, sensory details, focus statement (L)

Materials

  • Concrete and Sensory Language quote strips (one per student and one set to display; see Teaching Notes)
  • Tape (one 1-inch strip per student)
  • Music (to use during Mystery Quotes protocol; see Teaching Notes)
  • Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Excerpt of Pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (from Lesson 5; one per student)
  • Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Explaining Quotes handout (from Lesson 2; one per student and one to display)
  • Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Exit Ticket: Focus Statement (one per student and one to display)
  • Red, yellow and green markers (one of each per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select volunteers to read them aloud:
    • "I can explain how concrete words and phrases and sensory details convey experiences and events precisely."
    • "I can make connections between word choice and purpose."
  • Remind students that they should be familiar with these learning targets from the previous lesson.
  • Underline the words concrete words and phrases.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are concrete words and phrases?" (words and phrases that provide precise details and specific identifying information)

  • Underline the words sensory details.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are sensory details?" (details about how things look, sound, feel, smell, and taste)

  • Remind students that sensory details are often explained using concrete words and phrases. Example: "The cake was delicious because it had sweet, buttery chocolate frosting on top."
  • Underline the words word choice and emphasize that word choice in this context refers to the choice of concrete words and phrases and sensory details the author has used and how these words achieve the author's purpose.
  • Tell students that in this lesson, they will continue to work with an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World to analyze how the concrete words and phrases and sensory details convey experiences and events and to make connections between the word choice and purpose.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Ask:

"What is the author's purpose on pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World? (Responses will vary but may include: to describe the response of the rainforest animals to Meg's voice; to show the vast and diverse system of life within the rainforest.) (MMR)

  • For ELLs: Point out that make connections between is a collocation (words frequently used together). Say:

"The words make, connection, and between are often used together as a phrase and can be learned as a phrase, e.g., 'Researchers make connections between bilingualism and healthy brains.'"

  • Activate students' prior knowledge by asking them to share examples of concrete words and phrases and sensory details from the previous lesson. (MMR)

B. Engaging the Reader: Mystery Quotes (15 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to use the Mystery Quotes protocol to analyze quotes from the rainforest. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 2, but explain that the protocol will use Concrete and Sensory Language quote strips, tape, and music today.
  • Display the following steps and invite students to help you read the instructions aloud for the group. Answer clarifying questions:
  1. Choose a Concrete and Sensory Language quote strip.
  2. Without revealing your quote strip, pair up with someone and tape your quote on his/her back.
  3. When you hear music, mingle around the room. When the music stops, face a new partner.
  4. Turn around one at a time and read each other's quotes silently.
  5. Exchange a concrete or sensory language hint about your quotes. Example: "It describes the sound of some weather."
  6. When you hear the music again, repeat Steps 3-5.
  • Guide students through the Mystery Quotes protocol, using the posted steps.
  • When students have interacted with three partners, refocus whole group, asking them to leave the quotes on their backs.
  • Invite students to pair up with the person who originally taped the quote to their back.
  • Display all of the Concrete and Sensory Language strips.
  • Invite students to tell their partner which quote they think is on their back based on the hints they were given.
  • Partners can remove the quotes to reveal them.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What do the quotes all have in common?" (They all describe experiences in the rainforest through concrete and sensory language.)

  • Focus students on the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart and select volunteers to read aloud the definitions and functions.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to analyze the concrete and sensory language in their quotes.
  • After 2 minutes, cold call a few students to share their discussion with the group.
  • Model how to give hints to the mystery quotes without giving them away. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with expressive language: Consider inviting ELLs who need heavier support to first listen to descriptions of the quote on their back without having to describe quotes on others' backs. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with expressive language: Provide sentence frames to bolster participation. Examples: "Your quote is about _____. It talks about _____." (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Gathering Concrete and Sensory Language (30 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve the excerpt of pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World from Lesson 5.
  • Invite students to chorally read this excerpt aloud with you.
  • Move students into predetermined triads.
  • Explain that in this lesson, they will gather concrete and sensory language from the pages they have just heard.
  • Distribute and display the Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher.
  • Display and invite students to retrieve their Explaining Quotes handout and briefly review what to record in each column of the organizer, using the sentence stems on the handout as a guide. Explain to students that because this is a small excerpt, the context is the same for the whole excerpt, so they only have to fill this out once at the top of their organizer.
  • Invite student volunteers to help you model how to fill out a blank Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher using the following sentence from the excerpt: "A chameleon clamps two toes on one side of a stem and three on the other and listens to the soft burr of noise from inside, the place it cannot see." Refer to the Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and remind them specifically of the collaboration criteria. Remind students that because they will be working together in a small group, they will need to be conscious of working effectively with others.
  • Invite students to work with their triad to complete the organizer for the remaining parts of the excerpt of pages 41-42.
  • After 15 minutes, refocus the group.
  • Invite students to share what they recorded on their note-catcher. As students share out, capture their thinking on the note-catcher you used to model. Clarify any misconceptions as they arise. This will become the Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language Note-catcher: Class Version. Refer to the Explaining Quotes: Concrete and Sensory Language note-catcher (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

"What strategies helped you collect good examples of concrete and sensory language? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Model doing quick sketches within the note-catcher as placeholders for information. Say:

"You can sketch first so that you don't forget the information you want to add. Then you may go back later and write." (MMR)

  • Offer choice with the note-catcher by offering a version that includes lines in the boxes to support students' fine motor skills. (MMR, MMAE, MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket (10 minutes)

  • Share the question: "What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?"
  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Focus Statement.
  • Remind students that a focus statement is the main point an author will make in an essay.
  • Invite students to talk to the person next to them about how they would answer this question in one sentence using the sentence stem on their exit ticket.
  • Invite students to record their sentence on the exit ticket.
  • Explain that you will collate some of the focus statements from these exit tickets for students to choose from as they begin to write an essay to answer that question in the next lesson.
  • Collect students' exit tickets.
  • Refocus students on the learning targets and invite them to show ether a red, yellow or green marker for how close they feel they are to meeting each target now, with red being a long way from meeting the target and green being fully meeting the standard. Scan student responses and make a note of students who may need more support with this moving forward.
  • Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they collaborated in this lesson.
  • For ELLs: As students interact, jot down samples of effective communication. Also jot down one or two common language errors you hear--for instance, when word order is impeding communication. (Example: Lasky helps the reader understand how beautiful is* the rainforest.) Share each of these with the class, allowing students to take pride in the effective communication. In addition, encourage students to correct the errors. Briefly review word order for the whole class (e.g., subject + verb). Encourage the group to change the word order in the error you identified so that the focus is communicated clearly and accurately. (It's not necessary to identify who communicated well or who made errors. However, you might wish to pull the student aside to make it clear.)
  • Activate students' prior knowledge and memory by displaying an excerpt from pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Prompt students to reference the excerpt as they plan and write their response on the exit ticket. (MMR, MMAE)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Concrete and Sensory Language I: Gather concrete and sensory language from your independent reading book (either research or choice) on the note-catcher.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: To provide heavier support, consider highlighting concrete language and sensory details in the independent reading texts and allowing students to sketch in their note-catchers. Alternatively, provide an electronic copy of some of the possible contents of the note-catcher out of order and invite students to copy and paste the contents electronically into a blank note-catcher. (MMAE)

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