Close Read: Pages 41–42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M2:U2:L5

Close Read: Pages 41–42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • RL.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • W.5.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • W.5.9a: Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]").
  • L.5.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • L.5.4b: Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
  • L.5.4c: Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
  • L.5.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can explain how concrete words and phrases and sensory details convey experiences and events precisely. (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.4, L.5.4b, L.5.4c, L.5.5)
  • I can make connections between word choice and purpose. (RL.5.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated Excerpt of Pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (RL.5.4)
  • Exit Ticket (RL.5.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

B. Reading Aloud: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Reading: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (30 minutes)

B. Mini Lesson: Concrete and Sensory Language (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

B. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive III Practice in your Unit 2 homework.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students participate in a teacher-led close read of pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. This close read guides students through analyzing the concrete words and phrases and sensory details and to connect word choice to purpose (RL.5.4, RL.5.6, W.5.9a, L.5.4, L.5.5).
  • During the close read, all students participate in a Language Dive discussion that guides them through the meaning of a sentence from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. The sentence was chosen for its complexity, its use of concrete language and sensory detail, and its connection to future content. Invite students to discuss each chunk briefly, but slow down to focus on the highlighted structure and listens to the soft burr of noise from inside. Students will apply their understanding of the meaning and structure of this sentence when discussing and writing about concrete language and sensory detail in Lessons 6-13.
  • The close reading in this lesson is mostly teacher-led, so all students work at the pace the teacher sets, with support when necessary. Consider inviting students who need an extension opportunity to be peer coaches.
  • Lessons 1-3 featured built-out instruction for Goal 3 Conversation Cues. Moving forward, this will only appear as reminders after select questions. Continue using Goals 1-3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. Refer to the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework helps build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to the rainforest, specifically rainforest species and research. By participating in this volume of reading over time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it. Inviting students to share what they have been learning through independent reading holds them accountable.

How it builds on previous work:

  • Students have been reading excerpts from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World throughout Unit 1 and for homework.
  • In the first half of this unit, students have been analyzing text for figurative language, and in this lesson the analysis is extended to concrete and sensory details.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Throughout this lesson, students should work with a reading partner. Strategically pair students so they can support one another well as they read this complex text.

Assessment guidance:

  • Throughout the teacher-led close read, call on students to share their responses with the whole group to build knowledge collectively and clarify any misconceptions. As students are writing, circulate to clarify misunderstandings and use these as teaching points for the whole group.
  • Check students' vocabulary homework from Lessons 2-4.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 8, the class will use the information they have learned and gathered in the close read to plan and write an informational paragraph in response to this question: "What does the author's use of sensory detail and point of view help the reader understand about the rainforest?"

In Advance

  • Preview the Close Reading Guide: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 in conjunction with the text to familiarize yourself with what will be required of the students. Note that the Language Dive Guide is integrated into the Close Reading Guide.
  • Prepare:
    • Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Image of an acacia tree for use during the close read. Use an image search such as Google or Flikr.
    • Sentence strip chunks for use during the close read (see supporting materials).
  • Consider using heterogeneous partnerships for Work Time A.
  • Post: Learning targets, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, and Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: For students who benefit from hearing the text read aloud multiple times, consider using a text-to-speech tool like Natural Reader, SpeakIt! for Google Chrome, or the Safari reader. Note that to use a web-based text-to-speech tool like SpeakIt! or Safari reader, you will need to create an online doc, such as a Google Doc, containing the text.
  • Work Time B: Consider showing a video about concrete and sensory language, such as "Concrete Language." YouTube. SAS Curriculum Pathways, 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 28 Dec. 2015. <https://youtu.be/dVMcrchUpts&gt;.
  • Consider that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, preview links and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, for viewing them in the classroom.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Students complete their exit ticket online, using a Google Doc, for example.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.6, 5.I.B.7, 5.I.B.8, 5.I.C.11a, 5.II.C.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to determine the gist of, act out, and participate in a close read and Language Dive of an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. This will prepare them well to understand the meaning and structure of the text and to discuss what concrete language and sensory details help them understand about the rainforest.
  • ELLs may find identifying concrete language and sensory details challenging because they will first need to understand the meaning of the text they are analyzing. The Language Dive may prepare them well to fully understand the meaning of one sentence, but they may need to discuss, act out, sketch, and paraphrase additional sentences before they can identify concrete language and sensory details.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Provide students with practice using relative pronouns such as that, who, and which in relative clauses to describe a noun. Consider prompting them by preparing extracts of sentences from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Example: Some creatures swing or glide or climb. For those creatures, there are the 'emerald highways.' The 'emerald highways' are strung together by vines and lianas. The vines and lianas lace the tops of the trees together into a web for commuting life. (For those creatures that swing or glide or climb, there are the 'emerald highways' [that are] strung together by vines and lianas that lace the tops of the trees together into a web for commuting life.)

For heavier support:

  • There is a great deal of information discussed during the close read. It would help students who might become overwhelmed to briefly preview some of the key ideas and concepts before beginning. Key points to preview: names of animals, the ways animals move, reactions of animals to Meg's voice, concrete language and sensory details, and use of ellipsis. Consider assigning different groups to listen carefully for one of these key concepts each. They can be the experts on their own "piece of the puzzle." This will give students a focal point, and it will also provide additional motivation.
  • In preparation for writing the informational paragraph and the End of Unit 2 Assessment, review exit tickets with the class at the start of Lesson 6. Think aloud how to respond to the prompt using a sentence frame. (Example: "The sensory detail ____ helped me understand _____ about the rainforest.").
  • Consider inviting students to read and express the gist of some or all of the Concrete and Sensory Language strips from Lesson 6 in preparation for that lesson.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means or Representation: In this lesson, students are exposed to new literary vocabulary with "concrete words and phrases" and "sensory details." To facilitate comprehension, consider ways to convey the meaning of this new vocabulary. With concrete, use visuals to help students who may be unfamiliar with concrete and how it hardens. Additionally, activate students' prior knowledge with the five senses when discussing sensory details. Increased comprehension of these terms will enable students to apply them to the literary analysis in more meaningful ways.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression: Some students may need additional support when applying the new literary vocabulary during the close read. Consider varying the complexity of the task by highlighting small chunks of the text and directing students to focus only on those sections.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement: Inject humor into the lesson when talking about the five senses. Present scenarios that students may find silly, such as a dog getting sprayed by a skunk. It may be daunting for some students to select an example from the text for the exit ticket. Consider providing several examples they can choose from.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • concrete words and phrases, sensory details (L)
  • dissolved, humid, meaningless, coiled, meaningful, flick, prowl, clamps, slaps, cocks (T)

Materials

  • Excerpt of Pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (one per student and one to display)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Close Reading Guide: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (for teacher reference)
    • Affix list (from Module 1; one per student)
    • Image of an acacia tree (one to display; see Teaching Notes)
    • Language Dive III note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
    • Language Dive Sentence strip chunks III (one per pair)
  • Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest? (one per student and one to display)
  • Exit Ticket (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:
    • "I can explain how concrete words and phrases and sensory details convey experiences and events precisely."
    • "I can make connections between word choice and purpose."    
  • Underline concrete words and phrases and sensory details in the first target. Explain that while students may not be familiar with the meaning of these phrases yet, they will be by the end of the lesson.
  • Tell students that in this lesson, they will be closely reading an excerpt of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World to analyze the concrete words and phrases and sensory details and to make connections between the word choice and purpose.
  • For ELLs: Place your finger on convey. Ask:

"What is the translation of convey in our home languages? What is the meaning of convey?" (chuyen cho in Vietnamese; communicate information)

"What are we trying to convey by using concrete words and phrases and sensory details?" (experiences and events)

Invite students to repeat the phrase after you, slowly at first, and then at a normal speed. Focus on word stress: conVEY exPERiences and eVENTS. In addition, ask them to notice what happens to syllable stress when you say experiences and events. (The three words get linked together, almost into one. The word and is reduced, and the d sound is dropped.)

  • Engage students with the learning target and support their prior knowledge by asking them to name the five senses and how we use them. Provide an imaginary scenario (e.g., baking bread, dog getting sprayed by a skunk, hiking on a mountain) and ask them to describe what they might see, taste, smell, hear, and/or feel. (MMR, MME)

B. Reading Aloud: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (5 minutes)

  • Display and distribute excerpt of pages 41-42 of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • Read the excerpt aloud slowly, with expression, and without stopping, inviting students to read along silently in their heads.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

"What is the gist of this text? What is it mostly about?" (There is so much animal and plant life going about their lives in the rainforest all around Meg, and her words don't mean anything to them.)

  • Invite students to write the gist agreed on by the class next to the paragraph on the excerpt.
  • Add any new words to the academic and domain-specific word walls.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Before reading, ask:

"I will read an excerpt from our anchor text, The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. What do you think the excerpt will be mostly about?" (Responses will vary but may include: animals, the rainforest, Meg.) (MMR)

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Model doing a quick sketch next to the paragraph on their text as placeholders for gist. Say:

"You can sketch first so that you don't forget the gist. Then you may go back later and write." (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Reading: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (30 minutes)

  • Move students into predetermined pairs.
  • Point out the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart and focus students on bullets 5-11.
  • Tell students you are going to guide them through this close read. Explain that some questions will be discussed as a whole group, and others will be discussed with a partner.
  • Guide students through the Close Reading Guide: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, Pages 41-42 (for teacher reference). Refer to the guide for how to integrate the Language Dive and use the affix list, image of an acacia tree, Language Dive note-catcher, and Language Dive sentence strip chunks.
  • Refocus whole group. Invite students to play the role of each of the characters (animals) mentioned (including Meg) and have them act out the scene based on the words. You can repeat this multiple times with multiple groups.
  • For students who may need additional support: Provide key sections that are pre-highlighted in their texts. This will help them focus on smaller sections rather than scanning the whole text. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: During the close read, invite students who need lighter support to provide sentence frames to students who need heavier support for turn-and-talks. (MMR)

Examples:

    • "The author means ________."
    • "The choice of words tells the reader _____ about the rainforest."
    • "The choice of words makes the reader _____." (feel the movement/imagine the response/hear the sound)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: During the close read, display the text on a document camera or as an enlarged copy to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page. (MMR)

B. Mini Lesson: Concrete and Sensory Language (10 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart.
  • Remind students of the first learning target and the words sensory details.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What root can you see in the word sensory?" (sense)

"When we talk about the senses, what do we mean?" (see, hear, smell, taste, touch)

"So what do you think sensory details might be?" (details that describe how things look, sound, smell, taste and feel)

  • Invite students to read the sentence at the top of the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart and remind them that this is a section from the text they were just reading closely.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are some sensory details in the sentence at the top of the anchor chart?" (the soft burr of noise from inside)

"What does this sensory detail tell you as a reader?" (what the inside of a stem sounds like to a chameleon/what Meg's voice sounds like to a chameleon)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the Examples column on the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart. Refer to the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Record on the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart in the Definition and Function column that sensory details are details that describe for readers how things look, sound, feel, smell, and taste, so that readers can imagine the experience as if they were there. Refer to the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Remind students of the phrase concrete words and phrases in the first learning target.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How would you describe things made out of concrete? For example, the floor is often concrete and the outside walls of buildings are often made of concrete blocks." (solid, strong)

  • Explain that like concrete, concrete words and phrases give your mind something solid to work with when you read a sentence by providing precise details and specific identifying information.
  • Record this in the Definition and Function column on the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart. Refer to the Concrete and Sensory Language anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to compare the two sentences at the bottom of the anchor chart.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How are these sentences different?" (One provides precise information about exactly how the chameleon looked on the stem, while the other lacks detail.)

"What does the concrete phrase in the first example do for you as a reader?" (It helps you imagine exactly what the chameleon looked like on the stem.)

  • If productive, cue students with a challenge:

"What if we remove "one side of" and "and three on the other" from the first example? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • Emphasize that concrete words and phrases often explain sensory experiences. For example, concrete words and phrases are used to describe precisely what something looks, sounds, feels, tastes, or smells like.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with new vocabulary: Invite students to name things they can see, hear, smell, taste, and touch. (MMR, MME)
  • As you engage in a discussion about the word concrete, consider showing a visual of concrete to facilitate comprehension. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with new vocabulary: Ask:

"What is the difference between the words sense and sensory?" (Sense is a verb or action that means to feel things by seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, and touching. Sensory is an adjective and describes a noun or thing. It means something, such as a detail, is related to or describes seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, and touching.) (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket (10 minutes)

  • Remind students of the focusing question for the close read: "What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?"
  • Distribute Exit Ticket: What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest?
  • Read the questions aloud for students.
  • Invite them to work independently to answer the questions. Circulate to preselect students to share their responses with the whole group.
  • Refocus whole group and call on the preselected students to share their responses. Refer to the Exit Ticket: What does the author's use of concrete language and sensory detail help you understand about the rainforest? (example, for teacher reference).
  • Focus students on the learning targets. Read each one aloud, pausing after each to use a checking for understanding protocol for students to reflect on their comfort level with or show how close they are to meeting each target. Make note of students who may need additional support with each of the learning targets moving forward.
  • For ELLs: To foster inclusion and confidence, assist a student who need heavier support to formulate an answer to the question, then call on him or her to share with the class.
  • Provide several choices of concrete and sensory detail examples on the exit ticket and let students choose which one they want to respond to. (MME, MMAE)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

B. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive III Practice in your Unit 2 homework.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)
  • Consider offering multiple ways for students to respond to the prompt other than written expression. Examples could include pictures, digital media, song/poem, etc. (MMAE)

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