Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and Analyzing Literary Texts | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M2:U2:L4

Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and Analyzing Literary Texts

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • RL.5.6: Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.
  • RL.5.9: Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
  • RL.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • RI.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • SL.5.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • L.5.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.5.2d: Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
  • L.5.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.5.5a: Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
  • L.5.5b: Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can recognize and explain the meaning of similes, metaphors, and idioms in a text. (RL.5.4, RL.5.10, L.5.5)
  • I can accurately quote from a text, give context for the quote, and explain what the quote means when drawing inferences from a text. (RL.5.1, RL.5.10, L.5.2d)
  • I can describe how a narrator's point of view influences how events are described in a narrative. (RL.5.6, RL.5.10)
  • I can write a paragraph explaining the similarities of two literary texts about the rainforest. (RL.5.9, RL.5.10, L.5.2d, and L.5.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Parts I and II (RL.5.4, RL.5.6, RL.5.9, RL.5.10, L.5.2d, and L.5.5)
  • Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts (R.5.1, R.5.4, R.5.10, L.5.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Returning End of Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Understanding Figurative Language (15 minutes)

B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Describing and Comparing the Point of View (15 minutes)

C. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Tracking Progress (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Vocabulary. Follow the directions in your Unit 2 homework packet.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students complete the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. In Part I of the assessment, they read and analyze excerpts of literary texts, focusing on the language used by the authors. In Part II, they read and analyze two excerpts about the same event, comparing the point of view (RL.5.4, RL.5.6, RL.5.9, L.5.2d, and L.5.5).
  • In Opening A, students' End of Unit 1 Assessments are returned with feedback. The purpose of this is for students to have the opportunity to see how they performed in order to improve in their next assessment, and to ask questions if they don't understand the feedback.
  • In Work Time C, students share what they have read and learned from their independent reading texts. This sharing is designed as another measure for holding students accountable for their research reading completed for homework. This volume of reading promotes students' growing ability to read a variety of literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. (RI/RL.5.10, SL.5.1). (RI/RL.5.10, SL.5.1).
  • After the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, students reflect on their learning using the Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts recording form. This exercise is meant to provide them with time to formally keep track of and reflect on their own learning. This self-reflection supports metacognition and pride in work and learning.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework helps them to build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to the rainforest. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.
  • In this lesson, the habits of character focus are working to become an effective learner and working to become an ethical person. The characteristics students are reminded of specifically are perseverance, as they will be working independently on their assessments, and integrity, as they will be sharing their research reading homework.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In this lesson, students demonstrate reading skills practiced in Lessons 1-3 with new excerpts from literary texts about the rainforest.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 30 minutes allotted. Consider providing time over multiple days if necessary.

Assessment guidance:

  • All assessment materials (student copy, answer key, student exemplar) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • When assessing and providing feedback to students on this assessment, use the teacher answer key and sample student responses (see Assessment Overview and Resources) to help you complete the student Tracking Progress recording form. Consider making notes in the appropriate column for each criterion and marking evidence with flags/sticky notes on student work in a different color than student responses. There is also space provided to respond to student comments.
  • It will be valuable for students to revisit their previous Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts recording form before they begin, so they can remember what they would like to improve on from assessments in previous units/modules.
  • In this assessment, students are tracking progress toward anchor standards: R.1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text, R.4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone, R.10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently, and L.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist during the research reading share in Work Time C (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist (Grade 5) during the research reading share in Work Time C (see the Tools page).

Down the road:

  • In the second half of the unit, students will continue analyzing literary texts about the rainforest, using their analysis to plan and draft an informational essay in response to the texts they have read.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • End of Unit 1 Assessments with feedback from Unit 1, Lessons 12 and 13.
    • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
    • Research reading share using with the Independent Reading: Sample Plan document, or using your own independent reading routine.
  • Gather Tracking Progress folders.
  • Post: Learning targets, Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart, and Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Times A and B: Students complete the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment online, with questions set up on a Google Form, for example.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided by in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.A.1, 5.I.A.3, 5.I.B.6, 5.I.B.7, 5.I.B.8, 5.I.C.12a, 5.II.A.1, 5.II.C.6

Important points in the lesson itself                                                                                                                            

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 1-3.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to work independently on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. For some, independent writing may be a big leap from the heavily scaffolded, oral interaction that is typical of the classroom. ELLs are asked not only to independently apply cognitive skills developed in Lessons 1-3, but also to independently apply new linguistic knowledge introduced in those lessons. Specifically, they are asked to read and respond to an unfamiliar text, potentially full of new language.
  • Allow students to review language they've written on the Word Walls or in their vocabulary logs.
  • Remind students of strategies they practiced for reading unfamiliar texts.
  • Ensure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. See additional support in the lesson.
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss which assessment task was easiest and which was most difficult and why. In future lessons and for homework, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation: To get the most informative data from the assessment, ensure that all students have access to the assessment directions and feel comfortable with the expectations. Vary the ways in which you convey your expectations. (Example: Engage in a clarifying discussion about the directions or create a map of the assessment to preview the tasks on the assessment.)
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression: The mid-unit assessment requires students to demonstrate their learning in the same way. However, there is room for differentiation when students complete the Research Reading Share. Allow them to plan by highlighting or underlining the sections that they want to share with their partner. This will foster executive function skills and help their memory recall when they engage in a conversation. In the Closing, it is important that all students are able to meaningfully reflect on their work. Take away barriers to this by allowing them to refer to the work they have already completed in this unit. Also, allow students to orally reflect on their work with a partner before writing it down.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement: Assessments can be overwhelming to some students. Supply students with tools to support self-monitoring during the assessment (e.g., checklists or visual timers for each portion of the assessment). Also, provide tools that minimize distractions during the assessment, such as sound-canceling headphones or dividers.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • Do not preview vocabulary for this assessment lesson.

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback (one per student; completed in Unit 1, Lessons 12 and 13)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and Analyzing Literary Texts (one per student; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plans (see the Tools page; for teacher reference)
  • Tracking Progress folder (from Module 1; one per student)
  • Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (at least three per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

(Create a free account to access assessments.)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Returning End of Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Return students' End of Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback.
  • Invite students to spend a few minutes reading the feedback. If they require teacher support to understand the feedback, encourage them to write their names on the board so you can visit with them in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with reading: Reassure them that if they don't understand or cannot read the feedback, they will have an opportunity to review it with you during the lesson. (MME)
  • Build an accepting and supportive by reminding students that everyone is working toward individual goals and that learning is about continued growth and development. (MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud as students follow along, reading silently in their heads:
    • "I can recognize and explain the meaning of similes, metaphors, and idioms in a text."
    • "I can accurately quote from a text, give context for the quote, and explain what the quote means when drawing inferences from a text."
    • "I can describe how a narrator's point of view influences how events are described in a narrative."
    • "I can write a paragraph explaining the similarities of two literary texts about the rainforest."
  • Remind students that they have practiced the skills required by these learning targets multiple times over the course of this unit. In this assessment, they will apply these skills to read and analyze narrative texts.
  • Answer any clarifying questions.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with memory: Ask:

"Describe one example of how you worked to meet these learning targets in the previous three lessons."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Understanding Figurative Language (15 minutes)

  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and Analyzing Literary Texts.
  • Tell students that this assessment focuses on reading and analyzing the figurative language and point of view in literary texts.
  • Explain that this assessment is divided into two parts: In Part I, they will read literary texts and analyze the figurative language and what it helps the reader to understand in the texts. In Part II, they will read two excerpts from literary texts and compare the point of view used.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads, while you read the directions for each part of the assessment aloud. Answer clarifying questions.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart, specifically perseverance. Remind students that because they will work independently on the assessment, they may find it challenging, so they will need to persevere.
  • Ask students to begin Part I of the assessment. While they are taking the assessment, circulate to monitor their test-taking skills. This is an opportunity to analyze students' behaviors while taking an assessment. Document strategies that they use during the assessment. For example, look for those who are annotating their texts and returning to the text as they plan.
  • After 15 minutes, refocus students whole group.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with executive function skills: As you explain the assessment, display a "map" of it on the board or provide an individualized checklist. Provide timers to increase predictability for the assessment process. (MME, MMAE)

Example:

Analyze text and describe a point of view.

  1. Two parts:

A. Part I. Read texts. Analyze figurative language. (selected response and short answer) - 15 minutes

B. Part II. Describe and compare a point of view. (selected response and short answer) - 15 minutes

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: Ensure they are clear about all test directions. Rephrase the directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop those who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions. (MMR)

B. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Describing and Comparing the Point of View (15 minutes)

  • Tell students to turn to Part II of the assessment. Explain that as students finish their assessment, they should check over their work.
  • Remind students that since this is an assessment, they must work silently and independently.
  • Ask students to begin Part II. Circulate to monitor their test-taking skills. Document strategies students use during the assessment, such as annotating their text and going back to the text as they write their response.
  • After 15 minutes, refocus students whole group.

C. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them specifically of the integrity criteria. Remind students that even though you don't check every day, you want them to practice integrity, which means doing the right thing even when it's difficult. In the context of research reading homework, this means trying to do it each day, even when it is tough to do so, and if it isn't possible, being honest in the dates and pages read that are recorded in their journals.
  • Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plans to guide students through a research reading share.
  • Since some students may have completed some of the prompts in their independent reading journal orally with a family member or friend, it will be important that they have some notes or drawings to use for this sharing time. Consider meeting with them in advance to prep them for the research reading share and minimize the risk of public sharing. (MME)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with verbal expression: As groups of students interact, listen for language errors that are impeding communication. Sit with one group and discuss the language error and why it's impeding communication. Encourage the group to identify a clearer or more accurate way to express the communication. (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracking Progress (10 minutes)

  • Give students specific positive feedback on their completion of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (Example: "I admire your perseverance in reading and analyzing a complex new narrative text to complete your assessment. That must have been challenging!")
  • Distribute students' Tracking Progress folders and Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts. Remind students that successful learners keep track of and reflect on their own learning. Remind them that they have done this after every assessment.
  • Distribute sticky notes so students can mark up their work with evidence. Guide them through completing the recording form.
  • As time allows, invite students to revisit their previous Tracking Progress: Reading, Understanding, and Explaining New Texts recording form to discuss in pairs how they think they have progressed.
  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all students, but research shows it supports students who need additional support the most. (MMAE)
  • For students who have been sketching definitions of key words in learning targets throughout this unit: Allow them to refer to those sketches as they explain each learning target on the Tracking Progress recording form. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Allow students to orally paraphrase the meaning of the Tracking Progress criteria, self-assess, and discuss the evidence with a partner before they begin writing. (MMAE)
  • When completing the teacher response on the Tracking Progress recording form, provide feedback that emphasizes individual effort, improvement, and achieving a standard rather than performance relative to other students. (MME)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Vocabulary. Follow the directions in your Unit 2 homework packet.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)
  • Consider offering multiple ways for students to respond to the prompt other than written expression. Examples could include pictures, digital media, song/poem, etc. (MMAE)

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