Discover Our Topic: The Holocaust | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M3:U1:L1

Discover Our Topic: The Holocaust

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.8.1, RI.8.10, L.8.4b

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.8.2, RL.8.4, SL.8.1, L.8.4a, L.8.4c, L.8.5a, L.8.5b, L.8.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can infer the topic of this module from the resources. (RI.8.1)
  • I can select a research reading text that I want to read. (RI.8.10)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket (L.8.4b)
  • Work Time A: Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher (RI.8.1)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - L.8.4b (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Infer the Topic - RI.8.1 (20 minutes)

B. Introduce the Performance Task and Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Launch Independent Research Reading - RI.8.10 (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read and Reflect: Students read and reflect on the guiding questions for the module and discuss them with their families. They should consider how the guiding questions make them feel. They can sketch or write about their ideas.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • L.8.4b – Opening A: Students use affixes and roots to determine the meaning of a word in the entrance ticket. 
  • RI.8.1 – Work Time A: Students participate in the Infer the Topic protocol by engaging with images, video, and texts related to the topic in this module and cite evidence from the various resources posted around the room that most strongly support what they notice and wonder to infer about the topic.
  • RI.8.10 – Closing and Assessment A: Students will choose independent research reading texts, which are texts on the topic. See Independent Reading Sample Plans (see the Tools page) for ideas on how to launch independent reading. If using already established routines for launching independent reading, students will choose a research reading text. The research reading that students complete for homework helps build both their vocabulary and knowledge of the Holocaust. By participating in this volume of reading over time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of this topic.
  • At the end of the lesson, distribute the homework resources, and review the format of the document and this lesson’s specific assignment with students.
  • In this lesson, students do not collect new vocabulary independently. Instead, new vocabulary is collected as a class on the academic word wall and domain-specific word wall. Students determine and clarify the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the module guiding questions as they are added to the word wall. Students record each vocabulary word and its definition in their vocabulary logs from Module 1.
  • This lesson is the first that includes built-out instruction for the use of Goal 4 Conversation Cues. Goal 4 Conversation Cues help students think with others to expand the conversation. Refer to the Online Resources for the complete set of cues. Examples of the Goal 4 Conversation Cues used in this module include: 
    • To prompt students to compare:

“How is what _____ said the same as/different from what _____ said?”

    • To prompt students to agree, disagree, and explain why:

“Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why?”

    • To prompt students to add on to classmates’ comments:

“Who can add on to what your classmate said?”

    • To prompt students to explain:

“Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response?”

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Invite students to research one or more of the topics they analyzed during the lesson (e.g., Adolf Hitler, Auschwitz, concentration camps) to further build their background knowledge before reading the anchor text. Students might share their findings in small groups or with the whole class.
  • This module has been designed to avoid assigning independent research reading for homework on the same evenings when students are prereading the next chapter in their anchor text. Proficient readers may be ready to begin their independent reading prior to this lesson. They could then be asked to prepare a Book Talk or other presentation of their reading for this lesson to promote excitement amongst their peers for the independent reading book selection.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In Lesson 1 of Module 2, students participated in the Infer the Topic protocol to explore texts, images, maps, etc., and make inferences about the topic of food choices. In this lesson, students use the same protocol to discover a new topic.

Support All Students 

  • Integrated ELL supports are marked throughout lessons with a ▲. These teaching suggestions support student comprehension without disrupting lesson flow or requiring extensive class time or additional materials. Deeper, high-leverage supports, designed to accelerate ELLs’ language development, can be found in the lesson guidance.
  • Note there is a differentiated version of the Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 used in Opening A in the supporting materials. ▲
  • Note that the infer the topic resources bring up potentially sensitive topics such as genocide, concentration camps, and bigotry. Some students and their families may find these topics to be upsetting or in conflict with their values. Allow for time to process and respond to these topics during individual, small group, or full class discussion, and reach out to families as needed.
  • The gallery walk consists of stations in which students will read texts, view images, and watch video clips. This activity is multimodal, providing visual, auditory, and kinesthetic access points to the infer the topic resources. Students will choose which resources to engage with in this activity.
  • Accompany the posted learning targets with symbols or images for visual learners. Check for understanding by giving students time to write, sketch, or orally paraphrase the learning target. ▲
  • Group students heterogeneously. Students will be able to choose the documents they would like to examine in order to infer the topic. This encompasses diversity of learning styles, reading levels, and grasp of the English language. Students are not grouped based on ability. This provides students with multiple access points to meet the learning target. Invite students to help each other read the excerpts aloud to each other. Use the English subtitle function on the videos to support ELLs. ▲
  • Note there is a differentiated version of the Infer the Topic I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher used in Work Time A in the supporting materials. ▲
  • During Turn and Talk and Think-Triad-Share protocols, pair ELLs with partners and groups who have more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames, for example. ▲

Assessment Guidance

  • Monitor students’ Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catchers to ensure they are on the right track for inferring what the module is about at the end of the Infer the Topic protocol.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will begin reading and discussing Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History.

In Advance

  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1.
  • Post the Infer the Topic resources around the room, or print materials and provide multimedia access to each small group.
  • During the Infer the Topic protocol, display the cover of Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History as an infer the topic resource.
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.B.6 and 8.I.B.8.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson establishes an environment of respect for diverse perspectives through the use of an I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher to record observations and questions about varied resources, pairs students to support each other in carrying out tasks, and allows time for discussion. Students engage with the topic through the use of images, videos, and maps that portray elements of the topic of this module (the Holocaust) and are introduced to independent research reading.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to navigate the text-based Infer the Topic resources because of the volume of potentially unfamiliar new language. Encourage students to focus on the gist of select resources and language that is familiar. Encourage them to take pride in what they do understand. Before the lesson, add translations in students' home languages to the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart to make these important principles accessible to all students and to create a welcoming and inclusive environment for those students whose home language is not English.

Vocabulary

  • adversary, consolidating (A)
  • genocide, Nazi, upstander (DS)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Academic word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4, Opening B)
  • Directions for Infer the Topic (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)
  • Domain-specific word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Model performance task from former student (one for display; optional)
  • Independent Reading Sample Plans (for teacher reference) (see Tools page)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Directions for Infer the Topic (one per student and one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 (answers for teacher reference)
  • Infer the Topic resources (one for display)
  • World map (one for display)
  • Performance Task anchor chart (one for display; see Performance Task download)
  • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart (one for display; see Teaching Notes)
  • Homework Resources (for Families) (see full module or unit download)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 (one per student)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 ▲
  • Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher (one per student)
  • Infer the Topic I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher ▲
  • Online or paper English or translation dictionary (for ELLs in home language; one per student)
  • Homework Resources (for Families) (see full module or unit download)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner – L.8.4b (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1. For ELLs and students who require additional support, the Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 ▲ can be used to help guide students’ thinking by providing hints about which affixes to consider.
  • Once all students are ready, invite them to Turn and Talk to share meanings for the words consolidating (unite) and adversary (enemy).
  • With students’ support, record the meanings of consolidating (unite) and adversary (enemy) on the academic word wall, with translations in students’ home languages. Write synonyms or sketch a visual above each key term to scaffold students’ understanding.
  • Invite students to record these words in their vocabulary logs. Prompt students to use the words in a new sentence by either writing that sentence down or thinking of that sentence silently, then sharing with a partner. Add any relevant notes to the vocabulary strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

For Lighter Support

  • N/A

For Heavier Support

  • Invite students who need heavier support to use the Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 1 . This resource has hints about which affixes students can use to determine the meaning of vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Infer the Topic – RI.8.1 (20 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can infer the topic of this module from the resources.”

  • Focus students on the Infer the Topic resources posted around the room.
  • Distribute the Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catchers. Focus students on the question at the top and read it aloud:

"What do you think you will be learning about in this module?"

  • Remind students that the purpose of the note-catcher is to take notes to help them remember their thinking. It isn't something they will hand in for assessment, so they can record in pictures or words. They do not need to write in full sentences. For ELLs and students who require additional support, the Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher ▲ can be used to help guide students’ thinking by reducing linguistic barriers and to support vocabulary acquisition.
  • Be transparent about why students are noticing and wondering (because it is a helpful way to understand and explore a new topic or text).
  • Remind students that they used the Infer the Topic protocol in previous modules, and review as necessary using the Directions for Infer the Topic. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol at http://eled.org/tools.)
  • Guide students through the protocol. Allow them to choose what resources to observe, so those who may not be able to read independently have the option to view an image. Mixed-proficiency pairs can choose the resources they want to observe and begin by discussing what the text means. Encourage students to agree or disagree with one another about what the text means using sentence frames. Examples: “I agree because _____.” “I disagree because_____.”
  • Refocus whole group. As students observe the resources, if you notice them mimicking the physical movements represented in the photographs, take them aside and help them understand that in practicing respect, empathy, and compassion for the people who have personal connections to the Holocaust, it is inappropriate to mimic the movements. Think-Triad-Share:

“Now that you have looked at some resources, what do you think this module might be about?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: Nazis, Hitler, concentration camps.)

“What does this topic mean to you at this point? Why might it be meaningful to study this topic?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: to understand what Jewish people experienced during the Holocaust, to learn how people suffered this tragedy.)

“From what you know so far, what are you looking forward to about this topic?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: learning about the cause of the Holocaust, how Hitler could influence so many people, how people fought the Nazis.)

  • Cue students to compare the ideas of their classmates:

“How is what _____ said the same as/different from what _____ said? I’ll give you time to think and write.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Consider creating home language groups for this sharing portion of the lesson. Students can begin by discussing the material in home languages in their triads, then move to whole-group discussion in English. ▲
  • Explain that this module will be about the Holocaust that took place from 1941 to 1945 in Europe. Invite students to share any personal connections they are making to the Holocaust and remind students to practice empathy and compassion as they listen to the personal connections of others. Help students to identify Germany on a world map, and explain that Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party occupied Germany and other countries like Poland and Denmark during World War II to organize a genocide of Jewish people, Romani people, Slavs, homosexuals, and other groups of people.
  • Ensure students understand that in practicing respect, empathy, and compassion for the people with personal connections to the Holocaust, they should refrain from copying the physical movements adopted by the Nazi party visible in some of the photographs, including the salute and the way the soldiers marched.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • During Work Time A, as a lighter-support alternative to the Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher distribute a partially completed copy of the Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher . This provides students with models for the kind of information they should enter and relieves the volume of writing required.
  • Preselect texts for independent research reading that are appropriate for the students’ current levels of reading proficiency.

For Heavier Support

  • Invite students who need heavier support to use the Infer the Topic: I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher . This resource has sentence starters to help guide students in their observations. 
  • Provide an audiobook, if available, for students to follow along with as they read their independent research reading texts to help facilitate comprehension.

B. Introduce the Performance Task and Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Performance Task anchor chart, and read the task aloud.
  • As students may be overwhelmed by the Performance Task anchor chart, assure them that they will continue to explore the meaning of the chart in subsequent lessons and units.
  • Underline the word Holocaust. Turn and Talk:

“What does this mean? If you’ve heard of this word or know what it means, share with your partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to work in their triads to determine the meaning of the word using a dictionary or search engine. Remind students about the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart from Module 1 to help them determine the meaning of genocide. Refer students to the anchor chart if necessary. Use a total participation technique to select a student to share with the whole group (the deliberate killing of a large group of people, especially those of a particular ethnic group or nation).
  • Repeat with the words Nazi (a member of a German fascist party controlling Germany from 1933 to 1945 under Adolf Hitler) and upstander (a person who speaks or acts in support of an individual or cause, particularly someone who intervenes on behalf of a person being attacked or bullied). Add genocide, Nazi, and upstander to the domain-specific wall, including translations in home languages.
  • Turn and Talk:

“What do you notice about the task?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: we will read a graphic novel, we get to create a mini-graphic novel, we will display our graphic novel for visitors.)

“What do you wonder about the task?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: How will we create the graphic novel? Why were Jewish people targeted?)

“Now that you have analyzed the performance task, has your inference of what this module might be about changed? How?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Clarify anything pertinent to this specific performance task. Consider displaying a model performance task from a former student. Ask students to make connections between the model and the performance task.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Module Guiding Questions anchor chart, and read the questions aloud. Turn and Talk:

“Why do we have guiding questions for each module?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: to help focus our learning, to help us think about the performance task.)

  • Tell students that these are the questions that will guide their thinking and learning throughout the module. Turn and Talk:

“What do you notice?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: I notice the Holocaust is an event that happened in history because the question is written in past tense.)

“What do you wonder?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: What happened to these people who are victims and survivors? How did it start and end?)

“Now that you have analyzed the guiding questions and performance task, has your inference of what this module might be about changed?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Turn and Talk:

“What does this topic mean to you at this point? Why might it be meaningful to study this topic?” (Responses will vary, but may include the following: racism is still so current and it would be meaningful to study its roots.)

“From what you know so far, what are you looking forward to about this topic?” (Responses will vary, but may include learning about how Hitler was able to convince millions of people to hate and commit violence.)

"From what you know so far, how does this topic connect to habits of character?" (Responses will vary, but could include references to becoming ethical people as they seek to show empathy as they learn about the people who suffered this tragedy and respect as they discuss sensitive topics and experiences.)

  • Acknowledge that some students may already know something about this topic. Explain that for homework, they will reflect on the guiding questions and how they feel about them based on their own experiences and knowledge and that this will be discussed more at the beginning of the next lesson. And note that some students may know nothing about the topic—it will be interesting to dig in together.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Launch Independent Research Reading - RI.8.10 (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can select a research reading text that I want to read."

  • Launch independent reading for this module. There is a suggested independent reading launch in the Independent Reading Sample Plans.
  • At the end of 5 minutes, invite students to retrieve their independent reading journals.
  • Remind students they will use this journal to log their independent reading, both choice and research reading, and to answer reading prompts.
  • Remind students to respond to a prompt for homework in the front of their journals.

Homework

Homework

A. Read and Reflect

  • Students read and reflect on the guiding questions for the module and discuss them with their families. They should consider how the guiding questions make them feel. They can sketch or write about their ideas.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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