Write Collaborative Argument Essay: Introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U3:L3

Write Collaborative Argument Essay: Introduction and Proof Paragraph 1

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.8, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b, L.6.2, L.6.3, L.6.6

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.10, W.6.1d, W.6.10, SL.6.1b

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a model argument essay Proof Paragraph. (RI.6.8, W.6.1b)
  • I can introduce a claim and support that claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence drawn from informational texts. (RI.6.1, W.6.1a, W.6.1b, W.6.9b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 3 (W.6.1a, W.6.1d, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.10)
  • Work Time B: Collaborative Argument Essay (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.10, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b, W.6.10, L.6.2, L.6.3, L.6.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1a, W.6.1.d (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyze a Model: Proof Paragraph 1 - RI.6.8, W.6.1b (10 minutes)

B. Write a Collaborative Introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 - W.6.1a, W.6.1b (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief: Collaborative Writing Process - SL.6.1b (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Research Focus Figure: Students continue to research their focus figure and document information on the Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.6.1 – Opening A: Students complete an entrance ticket in which they read two sample student introductions to an argument essay. They offer feedback that could lead to a more effective introduction to an argument.
  • W.6.4 – Opening A: As part of the entrance ticket, students offer feedback on the development, organization, and style of two sample student introductions so that they are more appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.6.5 – Opening A: As part of the entrance ticket, students develop and strengthen their writing abilities by editing sample student introductions.
  • RI.6.8 – Work Time A: Students analyze Proof Paragraph 1 of the model argument essay. They trace the argument presented in the essay, focusing on the way that the author has supported the first point/reason with evidence and reasoning.
  • W.6.1 – Work Time A: Students analyze the clear points/reasons and relevant evidence used in Proof Paragraph 1 of the model essay to support the essay’s main claim.
  • RI.6.1 – Work Time B: Students work with partners to write the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of their collaborative argument essays. They use textual evidence to support their claims.
  • RI.6.3 – Work Time B: In their introductions and Proof Paragraphs, students analyze how key events in Mary’s or Katherine’s life have been illustrated in Hidden Figures.
  • W.6.1 – Work Time B: Students write the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of an argument essay. They make a claim and then support that claim with clear points/reasons and relevant evidence.
  • W.6.4 – Work Time B: Students produce clear and coherent introductions and Proof Paragraphs, whose development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.6.5 – Work Time B: With support and guidance from a partner, students develop and strengthen their writing through practice.
  • W.6.9b – Work Time B: Students use textual evidence to support the claims and points/reasons of their collaborative argument essays.
  • L.6.2 – Work Time B: Students demonstrate command of English conventions by spelling correctly and using correct capitalization and punctuation in their writing.
  • L.6.3 – Work Time B: Students use their knowledge of language and its conventions when writing their introduction and first Proof Paragraph.
  • L.6.6 – Work Time B: Students accurately use academic and domain-specific vocabulary in their essays.
  • In this lesson, students work to become effective learners through collaboration and work to become ethical people through respect. Students have to collaborate with a peer while drafting the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of the argument essay. Respect is a vital ingredient to successful collaboration.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • An optional Mini Language Dive, intended for use after students analyze Proof Paragraph 1 in Work Time A, is available in the Teacher’s Guide for English Language Learners. ▲
  • Some students may not need the level of scaffolding provided in this lesson. Release them to begin drafting their collaborative essay without the step of analyzing Proof Paragraph 1.
  • Challenge students to flesh out Proof Paragraph 1 with more evidence and reasoning. Encourage students to pull information from their argument evidence note-catchers to craft a more robust Proof Paragraph. Similarly, direct students to the academic and domain-specific word walls to incorporate some of the new vocabulary they have learned throughout this module into their essays.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • Students have analyzed a model argument essay and planned their collaborative essay in Lessons 1 and 2. In this lesson, students review the structure of an argument essay’s introductory paragraph, analyze an argument essay’s Proof Paragraph 1, and draft the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of their collaborative argument essay.

Support All Students

  • To gradually release scaffolds, and to offer an appropriate challenge for Module 4, students will draft their introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 in the same lesson. Writing these two parts could take some pairs longer than 25 minutes. Offer more time, if it is available.

Assessment Guidance

  • Ensure that students understand all the components of an argument essay prior to planning and drafting an independent argument essay later in the unit. Students will also need to be familiar enough with the essay components to be able to trace and evaluate the arguments written by their peers.
  • Use the Grade 6 Writing Process checklist to assess students’ writing abilities in Work Time B (see the Tools page).

Down the Road

  • In Lesson 4, students write the Proof Paragraph 2 and conclusion of their collaborative essay. Lesson 5 gives students an opportunity to peer review the collaborative essays and reflect on areas of improvement before completing research on their focus figure and planning their independent essays.

In Advance

  • Ensure computers and tablets are charged, logged in, and in good working order to maximize the amount of time students have to draft their two paragraphs in this lesson.
  • Review the Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) to determine the specific criteria that should be included in the second column, Characteristics of This Argument Essay.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol in preparation for Closing and Assessment A.
  • Review the student tasks and example answers to get familiar with what students will be required to do in the lesson (see Materials list).
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students, including entrance ticket (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Use a projector to guide students in filling out the Characteristics of This Argument Writing column of the Argument Writing Checklist.
  • Work Time B: Provide devices with a word-processing tool such as http://eled.org/0158.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.A.1, 6.I.A.3, 6.I.C.10, 6.I.C.11, 6.I.C.12, 6.II.A.1, 6.II.A.2, 6.II.B.3, 6.II.B.4, 6.II.B.5, 6.II.C.6, and 6.II.C.7.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson guides students through an analysis of the Proof Paragraph 1 from the model argument essay. An optional but encouraged Mini Language Dive invites students to analyze the reason presented in the Proof Paragraph 1; the practice section of the Mini Language Dive supports ELLs by equipping them with a sentence that can be immediately inserted into their own collaborative and independent essays. Finally, a closing Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol invites students to discuss what is working well and what could be improved about the collaborative process. This process supports students' metacognition.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to write both the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of their collaborative argument essays in one lesson, instead of across two lessons, as in previous modules. Create space for students to reflect upon their growth as writers across Modules 1-3 (e.g., through a discussion prompted by sentence frames like, "I used to _____, but now I _____"). Invite students to share strategies they have cultivated for writing effectively and efficiently. Remind students of their experience in Module 3 working with literary argument essays, which are similar in structure to the argument essays they are about to develop.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Argument Writing checklist (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy" (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (one per pair; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 14, Work Time B)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 3 (example for teacher reference)
  • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference)
  • Projector
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 3 (one per student)
  • Lined paper or device for word processing (one per pair)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1a, W.6.1d (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to distribute and review the Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 3. Refer to the Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 3 (example for teacher reference) for possible responses. Students will also need their Argument Writing checklist.
  • Quickly review the answers with students. Point out that while the content in first Introductory Paragraph from the entrance ticket is correct, the language used to convey it would not be the right choice for the tone and audience of this assignment.
  • Turn and Talk:

"In what context would it be appropriate to write or speak with the language used in Introductory Paragraph 1 on the entrance ticket?" (in a casual context, such as an informal, personal conversation with friends)

"Why do we change our language when we are writing an essay or giving a presentation?" (Choosing more formal language in our writing or speech conveys a more serious tone. It is meant to be less personal and more professional or academic.)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons.

For Lighter Support

  • N/A

For Heavier Support

  • During Opening A, give students who need heavier support the option of annotating the sample student introductions (e.g., with short notes, highlights, and/or questions in the margin) instead of producing written responses. Reducing the amount of writing expected of students will allow more processing time.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Analyze a Model: Proof Paragraph 1 – RI.6.8, W.6.1b (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can analyze the structure of a model argument essay Proof Paragraph.”

  • Display and direct students to retrieve their Model Argument Essay: “Dorothy.”
  • Ask a student to read aloud the sentence from the model’s introductory paragraph that conveys the two points/reasons that will be used to support the main claim: “Her accomplishments were remarkable because they led to major advancements in air travel and because they took place despite tremendous obstacles.”
  • Read aloud Proof Paragraph 1 of the model essay.
  • Ask:

“What do you notice about this Proof Paragraph?” (It is focused around the first point/reason, represented with yellow, introduced in the last sentence of the introduction—that Dorothy’s skills and hard work were very important in helping change the face of air travel.)

  • Turn and Talk:

“What sentence from this Proof Paragraph reminds the reader about the main claim of the whole essay and conveys the first point/reason that supports the claim?” (the first sentence)

  • Explain that the author has provided evidence to support her first point/reason and then provided reasoning for how that evidence supports the point/reason and how the point/reason supports the main claim.
  • Direct students to reread Proof Paragraph 1.
  • Turn and Talk:

“What evidence does the writer offer to support the idea that Dorothy’s skills and hard work were very important in helping change the face of air travel?” (Langley was trying to help the US military by developing airplanes that were stronger, faster, and more stable than any planes in other countries (52). Dorothy took an engineering physics course, participated in training, and did much independent studying and homework (51). She thought all day about what made planes fly (51). Her calculations and data were sent directly to engineers, “who used them to improve airplane designs” (56).)

  • Turn and Talk, cueing students to challenge their thinking:

“What if the writer had not included this information? How would that change the reader’s understanding of the topic?” (There would not be any textual evidence to show the reader why the writer came to this conclusion. Without evidence, there is no support for the claim; and therefore, it’s not an effective argument.)

  • Turn and Talk:

“What reasoning does the writer use?” (Dorothy’s mathematical brain and her commitment to learning were outstanding, and her work had a direct impact on the future of airplanes and aeronautics.)

  • Turn and Talk, cueing students to challenge their thinking:

“What if the writer had not included this information? How would that change the reader’s understanding of the topic?” (If these sentences had not been included, then it wouldn’t be clear to the reader how or why the writer was using evidence she included. Evidence alone is not enough to support the claim; and therefore, without reasoning, it’s not an effective argument.)

  • Turn and Talk:

“How can the structure of the model help you as you write your collaborative essay?” (The model structures its argument in a way that every piece is a support for another. All of the pieces of information are connected and relevant to one another. This can help me because I can follow the structure of the presentation of the point/reason, then the evidence, and finally the reasoning.)

  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • Before Work Time A, invite students to reread the collaborative and independent literary argument essays that they wrote during Module 3. Invite students who need heavier support to reflect, either aloud with classmates or privately in writing, on their answers to the following questions:
    • What are the main components of an argument essay?
    • What makes a main claim effective?
    • What helpful tips about argument writing can you offer yourself?
  • In Work Time A, after students analyze Proof Paragraph 1 of the Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy," invite students to participate in a Mini Language Dive in small groups to examine the way that the author restates the first reason in the paragraph (W.6.1a). This Mini Language Dive also helps students address W.6.1d by containing a prepositional phrase that gives additional information in a formal way.

For Heavier Support

  • Before Work Time A, invite students to reread the collaborative and independent literary argument essays that they wrote during Module 3. Invite students who need heavier support to reflect, either aloud with classmates or privately in writing, on their answers to the following questions:
    • What do you remember about the words claim, reason, evidence, and reasoning?
    • What was one strong part of your literary argument essay from Module 3?
    • What do you want to improve on in your Module 4 essay?

B. Write a Collaborative Introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 - W.6.1a, W.6.1b (25 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can introduce a claim and support that claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence drawn from informational texts."

  • Invite students to retrieve their Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer and their copy of the Argument Writing checklist. Point out the following characteristics on the checklist:
    • "W.6.1a: I have an introduction that gives readers the context they need to understand the topic or text."
    • "W.6.1b: I support my claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence."
    • "W.6.1a: My reasons and evidence are organized in a way that makes my argument clear and easy to follow."
  • Turn and Talk:

"Look at the second column. Are there any specific criteria you should be aware of specifically for this collaborative essay?" (I introduce any background information critical to my reader's understanding, such as her biographical details or the political and social context of the time when my figure was living. I use the best evidence from Hidden Figures, my research, and other supplementary texts to develop the points/reasons in my Proof Paragraphs and to support my main claim statement. Each point/reason is described in its own Proof Paragraph. The evidence included in each paragraph connects to the point/reason stated.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the Characteristics of This Argument Writing column, and direct them to do the same on their own copy. Refer to the Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Explain that students will work with their writing partner to draft their introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 to the argument essay focused on the remarkable accomplishments of Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson. Students should base their draft on the information they gathered and organized on their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher and Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer.
  • Distribute lined paper, computers, or tablets, and invite writing partners to begin.
  • Circulate and monitor, referencing the following resources as necessary:
    • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
    • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference)
    • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference)
  • With 2 minutes remaining, refocus students and allow time for them to log off devices or put away materials.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning target.
  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

ClosingLevels of Support

A. Debrief: Collaborative Writing Process - SL.6.1b (5 minutes)

  • Separate writing partners and create new partnerships for the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol.
  • Explain that working with a partner to accomplish a task has its benefits and its drawbacks. Reflecting on the process can help students strategize to determine best practices for working effectively and productively. Remind students that reflections, like any partner sharing, should be kind, helpful, and specific.
  • Direct students to move back to back with their partner. Invite students to discuss the following three questions with their new partner each time they are prompted to turn face to face:

"What is going well so far in the collaborative process?"

"What could be improved about the collaborative process?"

"What specific actions can I take to make these improvements?"

  • Circulate and monitor, listening to see if there are any major issues that need to be addressed. Be sure, also, to celebrate the highlights of working with a partner. As needed, cue students to listen carefully to one another:

"Can you repeat what your partner said in your own words?"

For Lighter Support

  • In the next lesson, students will participate in a Language Dive using a sentence from the conclusion of the model argument essay. Consider providing ELLs with the Language Dive sentence ahead of time. Students who need lighter support can write down three qualities of the sentence that make it an effective conclusion sentence.

For Heavier Support

  • In the next lesson, students will participate in a Language Dive using a sentence from the conclusion of the model argument essay. Consider providing ELLs with the Language Dive sentence ahead of time. Students who need heavier support can find two adjectives and two nouns in the sentence. They can use affix lists to make a guess about the meanings of the words.

Homework

Homework

A. Research Focus Figure

  • Students continue to research their focus figure and document information on the Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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