Plan Collaborative Argument Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U3:L2

Plan Collaborative Argument Essay

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, RI.6.3, W.6.1, W.6.5, W.6.9b

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.10, W.6.4, W.6.10

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can write a claim based on reasons and relevant evidence from the text. (W.6.1a)
  • I can plan a collaborative argument essay about why Mary's or Katherine's accomplishments are remarkable. (W.6.1, W.6.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 2 (W.6.1, W.6.5, W.6.10)
  • Work Time B: Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b, W.6.10)
  • Closing and Assessment A: Argument Writing Checklist (W.6.1)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Write a Claim for a Collaborative Argument Essay - W.6.1a (10 minutes)

B. Plan a Collaborative Argument Essay - W.6.1, W.6.5 (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief: Argument Writing Checklist - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Plan a Collaborative Literary Argument Essay: Students work to complete their assigned section of the Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.6.1 – Opening A: Students complete an entrance ticket in which they identify a characteristic of argument writing that is done well in the Model Argument Essay: “Dorothy.”
  • W.6.5 – Opening A: As part of the entrance ticket, students examine the model essay for criteria of an effective argument essay.
  • RI.6.1 – Work Time A: Students write a claim for their collaborative argument essays. They use textual evidence from their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catchers to support their claims.
  • RI.6.3 – Work Time A: In writing their claims, students use as evidence key events that Margot Lee Shetterly has described and elaborated upon in Hidden Figures. Information about these events has been captured on students’ note-catchers.
  • W.6.1 – Work Time A: Students begin to develop their collaborative argument essays. They generate their main claims, which they will support with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  • W.6.5 – Work Time A: With support from their partners, students write the main claims of their collaborative argument essays.
  • RI.6.1 – Work Time B: Students plan their collaborative argument essays. They identify the textual evidence they will use to support their claims.
  • RI.6.3 – Work Time B: Students refer to key events in the text as they collect evidence to support their claims.
  • W.6.1 – Work Time B: Students plan collaborative argument essays, in which they support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  • W.6.5 – Work Time B: With their partners, students develop and strengthen their writing through careful planning of their collaborative essays.
  • W.6.9b – Work Time B: Students use textual evidence to support the claims and reasons of their collaborative argument essays.
  • W.6.1 – Closing and Assessment A: Students participate in a debrief activity to confirm that their argument writing planners show a strong claim that is supported by reasons and evidence.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Some students may not need the level of scaffolding provided in this lesson. Remind students to choose evidence that closely connects to their main claim. Then release them to begin drafting their collaborative essay without using the step of filling in the writing planner.
  • Challenge students to incorporate evidence from some of the other sources they read during this module, such as the speeches by President Kennedy. Guide students to meaningfully tie evidence from these sources into their argument.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the previous lesson, students analyzed a model argument essay to understand how evidence and reasoning support a claim. Students apply their learning in this lesson by preparing for and planning their collaborative argument essay about their assigned hidden figure (either Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson).

Support All Students

  • The Collaborative Argument Essay requires a considerable amount of focused pairwork across many lessons. Make strategic grouping choices to ensure that all students, including ELLs, are supported in their pairs. Make sure that differences in language ability within partnerships are not so stark that one student entirely dominates the evidence-gathering and writing-planning process. ▲
  • Some students may feel more prepared than others to contribute to the writing planners with a partner. Emphasize that planning writing is a process, and collaboration is mutually beneficial. Remind students that they can continue to complete their planners at home if they were unable to complete the entire task during Work Time B.
  • A Model Writing Plan graphic organizer is not provided in Module 4, as students should now be prepared to fill in their collaborative and independent writing planners without this guide. Fill in a writing planner based on the model, or fill it in with students if this scaffold is still needed.

Assessment Guidance

  • Ensure that students understand how the note-catcher leads into the writing planner and then the essay. Students should see writing as a process beginning with gathering information, organizing that information, then, finally, presenting the information in a composition.
  • Use the Grade 6 Writing Process checklist to assess students’ writing abilities in Work Time B (see the Tools page).

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students begin drafting their collaborative essays. By Module 4, students should be more proficient in the process of moving from a writing planner to the first draft of an essay; as such, students will write both their introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 during the next lesson.

In Advance

  • Strategically group students into pairs to plan and write the collaborative essay focused on either Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson.
  • Review the content in the Model Argument Evidence: Dorothy note-catcher and Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy" in preparation for guiding students to see how these documents are connected to each other and how these documents combine to provide support in the students' writing.
  • Review the student tasks and example answers to get familiar with what students will be required to do in the lesson (see Materials list).
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students, including entrance ticket (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Students may prefer to complete their Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer using a word-processing tool such as http://eled.org/0158.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.A.1, 6.I.A.2, 6.I.C.10, 6.I.C.11, 6.I.C.12, 6.II.A.1, 6.II.A.2, 6.II.B.3, 6.II.B.4, 6.II.B.5, 6.II.C.6, and 6.II.C.7.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson guides students through the steps of planning their collaborative argument essays. Students have the opportunity to review the Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher, where they have been collecting textual information since Unit 2. Then, in their pairs, they compare note-catchers, add details to strengthen their arguments, and draft a claim statement. This process of carefully reviewing notes with a partner before drafting the main claim of the essay is beneficial for all students, but especially ELLs, as this builds more time into the planning process and invites thoughtful collaboration.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to collaboratively plan an essay during Work Time B, even though they completed similar tasks in Modules 1-3. Take the time to pair students very strategically, taking into consideration English-language proficiency, writing abilities, and general rapport. Note that pairing students with very disparate English-language needs (e.g., a student who needs heavier language support and one who needs much lighter support) might not be the most appropriate or effective way to support students. Instead, try to pair students with similar levels of English-level proficiency, but with distinct skills (e.g., a stronger reader with a stronger writer). Help students develop collaborative strategies that work for them and their partners (e.g., negotiating ideas aloud before writing them independently, writing independently first and then comparing notes and adding or modifying note-catchers as needed, designating alternating "scribes" to take notes or sketch as the other student shares ideas aloud).

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Painted Model Argument Essay (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Annotated Model Argument Essay (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time C)
  • Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, Work Time A)
  • Work to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 8, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Work Time A)
  • Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy" (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 2 (example for teacher reference)
  • Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 2 (one per student)
  • Argument Writing checklist (one per student)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to distribute and review the Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 2. Distribute the Argument Writing checklist. Students will also need to reference the Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy." Refer to the Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 2 (example for teacher reference) and Painted Model Argument Essay (example for teacher reference), and Annotated Model Argument Essay (example for teacher reference).
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons. Invite students to choose a habit of character focus for themselves for this lesson.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Write a Claim for a Collaborative Argument Essay - W.6.1a (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can write a claim based on reasons and relevant evidence from the text."

  • Move students into their predetermined pairs. Clarify that students are working with this group to write a practice argument essay about either Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson before independently writing an argument essay about the focus figure they have been researching.
  • Invite students to retrieve their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher. Reveal which hidden figure each group will be responsible for writing about.
  • Display the following steps on the board, and read them aloud.
      1. Review the focus question.
      2. Compare note-catchers on the relevant hidden figure, and add any additional details that may strengthen your argument.
      3. Decide which two points best answer the focus question.
      4. Draft a main claim that includes those two points on the bottom of the note-catcher. Use the claim in the model essay on Dorothy to guide you as you construct your own claim.
  • Clarify any misunderstandings. Direct students to review the habits of character anchor charts and choose one habit that will guide their work with their groups today.
  • Release partners to begin working on their claim. Refer to Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference).
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • Before students draft the claims of their collaborative argument essays during Work Time A, allow time for students to review their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catchers. Students who need lighter support can star the reasons or pieces of evidence that they think are most compelling and relevant. This will help students feel more prepared to work with a partner to draft a main claim.

For Heavier Support

  • Before students draft the claims of their collaborative argument essays during Work Time A, allow time for students to review their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catchers. Students who need heavier support can flesh out some of their notes, adding clarifying information as needed. This will help students feel more prepared to share the information on their note-catchers with a partner.
  • During Work Time A, students learn which hidden figure—Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson—they will be writing about in their collaborative essays. If productive, chat privately ahead of time with students who need heavier support and invite them to discuss aloud some of the key findings from their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catchers. Some students may have more detailed notes for Mary or Katherine; consider assigning students to write about the hidden figure whose life they know more about.

B. Plan a Collaborative Argument Essay - W.6.1, W.6.5 (25 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can plan a collaborative argument essay about why Mary's or Katherine's accomplishments are remarkable."

  • Distribute the Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer.
  • Remind students that they have used a similar tool in previous modules, and that much of the information they will record on this planner, they have already found when they were filling in the evidence note-catcher. Explain that the planner will be used to prepare for the collaborative essay, but the planner will be optional for their independent essay.
  • Ensure that students understand their task before releasing them to begin working.
  • Circulate and monitor, using the Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • With 1 minute remaining, refocus students' attention. Explain that if they were unable to complete the writing planner during this time, they will need to complete it for homework in preparation for drafting the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 in the next lesson. If needed, direct students to assign responsibility within their partnerships for completing parts of the planner for any remaining paragraphs.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief: Argument Writing Checklist - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to retrieve their Argument Writing checklist. Point out the following characteristics:
    • "W.6.1a: I state my claim clearly, and my writing stays focused."
    • "W.6.9, W.6.1b: My claim is supported by reasons and evidence from credible sources and shows a solid understanding of the topic or text."
  • Turn and Talk:

"Look at the second column. Are there any specific criteria you should be aware of specifically for this collaborative essay?" (The claim includes the name of my assigned figure and states why her accomplishments are remarkable. The claim includes two specific points to support the claim. The points come from the anchor text, research sources, or other supplementary texts we read in class.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the Characteristics of This Argument Writing column, and direct them to do the same on their own copy. Refer to the Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

Homework

Homework

A. Plan a Collaborative Literary Argument Essay

  • Students work to complete their assigned section of the Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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