Write Collaborative Argument Essay: Proof Paragraph 2 and Conclusion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U3:L4

Write Collaborative Argument Essay: Proof Paragraph 2 and Conclusion

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.8, W.6.1b, W.6.1c, W.6.1d, W.6.1e, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b, L.6.2, L.6.3, L.6.4b, L.6.6

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.10, W.6.10, SL.6.1

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a model argument essay conclusion paragraph. (W.6.1e)
  • I can support a claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence drawn from informational texts. (RI.6.1, W.6.1.b, W.6.9b)
  • I can provide a concluding section that follows from my argument. (W.6.1e)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 4 (RI.6.1, RI.6.8, W.6.1b, W.6.5, W.6.10)
  • Work Time A: Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion note-catcher (RI.6.1, W.6.1d, W.6.1e, SL.6.1, L.6.4b)
  • Work Time B: Collaborative Argument Essay (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.10, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b, W.6.10, L.6.2, L.6.3, L.6.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - RI.6.8, W.6.1b (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion - W.6.1e (10 minutes)

B. Write a Collaborative Proof Paragraph 2 and Conclusion - W.6.1b, W.6.1e (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflect on Academic Mindsets - SL.6.1 (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Draft a Collaborative Argument Essay: Students work to complete their assigned paragraphs of the Collaborative Argument Essay.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • RI.6.1 - Opening A: Students complete an entrance ticket in which they examine the textual evidence used in Proof Paragraph 2 of the model argument essay to support the essay's main claim.
  • RI.6.8 - Opening A: As part of the entrance ticket, students trace the argument presented in Proof Paragraph 2 of the model argument essay.
  • W.6.1b - Opening A: As part of the entrance ticket, students identify the way in which the claim of the model argument essay has been supported with a clear reason and relevant evidence in Proof Paragraph 2.
  • W.6.1d - Work Time A: Students participate in a Language Dive to analyze a key sentence from the conclusion paragraph of the model argument essay. They identify the elements of the sentence that are typical of academic writing.
  • W.6.1e - Work Time A: As part of the Language Dive, students analyze how the sentence effectively concludes the model essay by synthesizing ideas and offering reflection.
  • L.6.4b - Work Time A: As part of the Language Dive, students use the affix -ment to support their understanding of the words acknowledgment and accomplishment.
  • RI.6.1 - Work Time B: Students work with partners to write Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion of their collaborative argument essays. They use textual evidence to support their claims.
  • RI.6.3 - Work Time B: In Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion, students analyze key events in Mary's or Katherine's life.
  • W.6.1 - Work Time B: Students write Proof Paragraph 1 and the conclusion of an argument essay. They continue to support the claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence, and they provide a concluding statement that follows from the argument presented.
  • W.6.4 - Work Time B: Students produce clear and coherent Proof Paragraphs and conclusions, whose development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.6.5 - Work Time B: With support and guidance from a partner, students develop and strengthen their writing through practice.
  • W.6.9b - Work Time B: Students use textual evidence to support the claims and reasons of their collaborative argument essays.
  • L.6.2 - Work Time B: Students demonstrate command of English conventions by spelling correctly and using correct capitalization and punctuation in their writing.
  • L.6.3 - Work Time B: Students use their knowledge of language and its conventions when writing their introduction and Proof Paragraph 1.
  • L.6.6 - Work Time B: Students accurately use academic and domain-specific vocabulary in their essays.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Challenge students to flesh out Proof Paragraph 2 with more evidence and reasoning. Encourage students to pull information from their argument evidence note-catchers to craft a more robust Proof Paragraph. Similarly, direct students to the academic and domain-specific word walls to incorporate some of the new vocabulary they have learned throughout this module into their essays.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • Students have been analyzing a model argument essay and have used their analysis to draft the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1 of a collaborative argument essay. This lesson continues those routines to guide students in collaboratively drafting Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion.

Support All Students

  • Students will draft Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion in the same lesson. Help pairs exercise their time-management skills and take ownership of their own writing pace. Encourage students to establish goals that help them effectively allot their time across the two paragraphs (e.g., "At 12:35, we will begin writing the conclusion. At 12:50, we will quickly proofread both paragraphs for small errors").
  • Some pairs may need additional support drafting their Proof Paragraph 2 and conclusion. Group those students and lead a discussion that will guide them in supporting their claims and synthesizing their thoughts about the essay. Use the students' Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher to guide the discussion.

Assessment Guidance

  • The entrance ticket asks students to locate the evidence and reasoning provided in the model argument essay's Proof Paragraph 2. If time is a concern, have students identify just one piece of evidence in the paragraph rather than all of the evidence. Alternatively, students could color-code or annotate their model essay to identify these pieces, rather than write them out on the entrance ticket.
  • Ensure that students understand all the components of an argument essay prior to planning and drafting an independent argument essay later in the unit. Students will also need to be familiar enough with the essay components to be able to trace and evaluate the arguments written by their peers in the next lesson.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will participate in a Peer Review protocol to trace the arguments posed by their peers in their collaborative essays.

In Advance

  • Gather all other pieces of the students' collaborative essay.
  • Charge electronic devices if students are going to type their Proof Paragraph 2 and conclusion rather than hand-write them. Ensure devices are logged in and in good working order to maximize time for writing during the lesson.
  • Review the Language Dive Guide and materials used in this lesson.
  • Review the student tasks and example answers to get familiar with what students will be required to do in the lesson (see Materials list).
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students, including entrance ticket (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Students use a device and a word-processing program, such as http://eled.org/0158, to compose Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion of their collaborative essays.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.A.1, 6.I.A.3, 6.I.C.10, 6.I.C.11, 6.I.C.12, 6.II.A.1, 6.II.A.2, 6.II.B.3, 6.II.B.4, 6.II.B.5, 6.II.C.6, and 6.II.C.7.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson features a Language Dive that highlights an important sentence from the conclusion of the model argument essay. By equipping students with a Practice frame that can be directly incorporated in their own collaborative and independent argument essays, this Dive prepares students to produce effective conclusions that reiterate the main claim and convey the overall relevance and importance of the essay. This direct applicability is key for ELLs, who may have less formulaic language to draw from in their own academic writing.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to write both the Proof Paragraph 2 and the conclusion for their collaborative argument essays in the same lesson, especially if they struggled in the previous lesson to produce the introduction and Proof Paragraph 1. Offer additional time, if it is available. Check in with students individually, and invite a discussion about time management and writing speed. Encourage students to try new approaches to see what works for them (e.g., if students are spending inordinate amounts of time to produce single sentences, invite them to approach each paragraph first as a QuickWrite—getting down as many relevant ideas as possible—and then working to carefully edit and polish the paragraphs after, crafting clear reasons and reasoning.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, Work Time B)
  • Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy" (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (one per pair; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Argument Writing checklist (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Collaborative Argument Essay (one per pair; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, Work Time B)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 4 (example for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive Guide: Model Essay Conclusion (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion Sentence Chunk Chart (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 4 (one per student)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion note-catcher (one per student)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion sentence chunk strips (one per pair or group of students)
  • Lined paper or word-processing devices (one per pair)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - RI.6.8, W.6.1b (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to distribute and review the Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 4. Refer to the Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 4 (example for teacher reference) for possible responses. Students will need their Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy" to complete the ticket.
  • Explain that the evidence and reasoning students have identified on the entrance ticket is the type of information they will be recording on their Writing Plan graphic organizers for their collaborative essay.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons. Invite students to choose a habit of character focus for themselves for this lesson.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion - W.6.1e (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can analyze the structure of a model argument essay conclusion paragraph."

  • Tell students they will now participate in a 10-minute Language Dive to examine an effective concluding sentence of an argument essay.
  • Direct students to retrieve their Model Argument Essay: "Dorothy."
  • Reread the conclusion paragraph aloud, and invite students to follow along. Focus students on this sentence in the conclusion:
    • "The history of NACA and space science is incomplete without acknowledgment of Dorothy Vaughan's remarkable accomplishments."
  • Use the Language Dive Guide: Model Essay Conclusion and the Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion Sentence Chunk Chart to guide students through a Language Dive conversation about the sentence. Distribute and display the Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion note-catcher and the Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion sentence chunk strips. Refer to the Language Dive: Model Essay Conclusion note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • As an extension to the Language Dive of Work Time A, draw students' attention to the words incomplete without in the Language Dive sentence. Invite students who need lighter support to rewrite this sentence without using two words that function as negatives. Students might exchange incomplete without with complete with. Engage students in a discussion about the differences in meaning between these two sentences.

For Heavier Support

  • As an extension to the Language Dive of Work Time A, draw students' attention to the words incomplete without in the Language Dive sentence. Provide students who need heavier support with an alternative sentence: The history of NACA and space science is complete with acknowledgment of Dorothy Vaughan's remarkable accomplishments. Invite students to discuss the differences in meaning between these two sentences. As needed, students can use their home languages as a resource to help them interpret the two sentences.

B. Write a Collaborative Proof Paragraph 2 and Conclusion - W.6.1b, W.6.1e (25 minutes)

  • Review the learning targets relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can support a claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence drawn from informational texts."

"I can provide a concluding section that follows from my argument."

  • Invite students to retrieve their Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer and their copy of the Argument Writing checklist. Point out the following characteristics on the checklist:
    • "W.6.1e: I have a conclusion that is clearly related to my argument and restates my claim."
    • "W.6.1c: I use words and phrases to show that my reasons are connected to my claim."
  • Turn and Talk:

"Look at the second column. Are there any specific criteria you should be aware of specifically for this collaborative essay?" (My conclusion restates my main claim and includes my own thinking about why the figure's accomplishments are remarkable. I use transitions from one idea to the next and in between evidence about the fIgure's accomplishments and reasoning for why they're remarkable.)

  • As students add criteria in the second column of the checklist, encourage them to refer to the focus of the essay in general terms because they will use the same checklist for their collaborative essay about Mary or Katherine and for the essay about their focus figure.
  • As students share, capture their responses in the Characteristics of This Argument Writing column, and direct them to do the same on their own copy. Refer to the Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Explain that students will work with their writing partner to draft Proof Paragraph 2 and their conclusion to the argument essay focused on the remarkable accomplishments of Mary Jackson or Katherine Johnson. Students should base their draft on the information they gathered and organized on their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher and Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer.
  • Distribute lined paper or word-processing devices, and invite writing partners to begin.
  • Circulate and monitor, referencing the following resources as necessary:
    • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
    • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference)
    • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference)
  • With 2 minutes remaining, refocus students and allow time for them to log off devices or put away materials. If crews have not completed their drafts, they should determine who will be responsible for finishing each of the incomplete paragraphs for homework.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

ClosingLevels of Support

A. Reflect on Academic Mindsets - SL.6.1 (5 minutes)

  • Incorporate reflection on and awareness of the following academic mindset: "This work has value to me."
  • Turn and Talk:

"How does the topic of the argument essay relate to this academic mindset?" (Just as we identified in the Language Dive, history is incomplete without acknowledgment of those who made remarkable contributions to our world. This work has value to me because I get to lift up those accomplishments to a wider audience and give recognition to those who deserve it.)

"Which of the habits of character most closely match the idea stated in this academic mindset? Explain your reasoning." (Responses will vary, but may include: This academic mindset matches "I apply my learning to help our school, the community, and the environment." Both statements recognize that education is a responsibility; when we learn about an inequity, we must use our learning to contribute to a better world.)

For Lighter Support

  • N/A

For Heavier Support

  • As students reflect on academic mindsets, consider alternatives to the Turn and Talk protocol that may be more helpful for students who need heavier support. For example, if time allows, consider using a Chalk Talk protocol to help students address the two reflection questions. Chalk Talks allow more processing time and ensure that all students are heard.

    Homework

    Homework

    A. Draft a Collaborative Argument Essay

    • Students work to complete their assigned paragraphs of the Collaborative Argument Essay.

    B. Independent Research Reading

    • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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