Performance Task: Creating a Leaflet to Distribute | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M4:U3:L8

Performance Task: Creating a Leaflet to Distribute

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RI.5.7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • W.5.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.5.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can create an emergency preparedness leaflet to prepare people to be ready for a natural disaster. (RI.5.1, RI.5.7, W.5.2, W.5.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Emergency preparedness leaflet (RI.5.1, RI.5.7, W.5.2, W.5.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Writer: Performance Task Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing Models: Emergency Preparedness Leaflets (20 minutes)

B. Partner Writing: Planning and Creating an Emergency Preparedness Leaflet (80 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Whole Group Share: Emergency Preparedness Leaflets (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Prepare your two personal items to bring in for Lesson 12 to use in your presentation.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • Two lessons have been allocated for the creation of emergency preparedness leaflets to provide students with sufficient time to create high-quality work products. The leaflets will be copied and distributed during their performance task presentations. If these lessons are facilitated in two separate one-hour sessions, review the learning targets and the Performance Task anchor chart at the beginning of the second lesson as well, to set a purpose for the work in the lesson.
  • In Work Time A, students work in pairs to analyze authentic emergency preparedness leaflets to generate criteria in preparation for creating their own emergency preparedness leaflets (RI.5.1, RI.5.7, W.5.2, W.5.4). These criteria are collected whole group for students to refer to as they create their leaflets in Work Time B.
  • In Work Time B, students work in pairs to create an emergency preparedness leaflet to copy and distribute when they deliver their performance task presentations in Lesson 12. There are a number of options for the creation of this leaflet, depending on the technology and materials available. Students could create their leaflets using technology, or they could create them by hand using markers or colored pencils (RI.5.1, RI.5.7, W.5.2, W.5.4). Students are left to work in pairs relatively autonomously, participating in a peer critique with another pair if they choose. This is to gradually release students to apply the processes they have learned about planning, revising, and creating work products over the course the year with minimal guidance.
  • In the Closing, students circulate to view leaflets created by other pairs and to provide positive feedback.
  • In this lesson, students continue to focus on working to contribute to a better world as they apply their learning to help their school and community by educating them about preparing for natural disasters.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Unit 1, students created PSAs, and throughout this unit they have identified items to include in an emergency preparedness kit and their rationale for including those items. In this lesson, students use everything they have learned over the course of the module to create a product to distribute during their performance task presentations.

Assessment guidance:

  • Review students' leaflet plans to identify common issues to use as whole group teaching points before students begin working on the final product.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need additional support writing their leaflets. Consider inviting pairs who may need additional support to sit together in a group to create a leaflet as a group with teacher guidance.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students will prepare the prompt cards for their presentations before presenting them to a live audience in Lesson 12

In Advance

  • Ensure that guests have been invited to student presentations in Lesson 12.
  • Prepare copies of student essays from the End of Unit 3 Assessment for students to refer to as they plan and create their leaflets.
  • Prepare technology or physical materials for students to create leaflets (e.g., 8.5- by11-inch blank paper, markers, colored pencils). Refer to Technology and Multimedia for technologysuggestions.
    • If using physical materials, organize them in one area of the room where you would like students to work.
  • Consider working with a technology teacher to support students in creating leaflets.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list)

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Work Time A: Consider showing students additional leaflets and fliers. Use a search engine's image search to look for "emergency preparedness leaflet brochure" or "disaster preparedness leaflet brochure" and access other examples.
  • Work Time B: Provide students with devices with appropriate technology tools (e.g., word-processing tools with which students can create tables and add images or clipart), one per pair, to create leaflets.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.6, 5.I.C.10, 5.I.C.12, 5.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with the opportunity to view and analyze models of authentic emergency preparedness leaflets in preparation for the work they will do over the next two lessons, and to work within pairs to plan and create the leaflets.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to understand the genre of leaflet writing, as well as keep pace with the class in planning and writing their emergency preparedness leaflets within the time allotted. Consider working with a small group of students to help them determine which information they will include and how they will represent the information in their leaflet (see levels of support and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Challenge students by inviting them to repeat and rephrase the lesson questions for classmates who need heavier support.
  • Challenge students who need lighter support to create sentence frames to support the discussion during Work Time A. Invite students who need heavier support to use the frames. (Examples: One thing the leaflets all have in common is ______________. Some information included in all of the leaflets is __________. All of the leaflets are organized by ____________. One design feature I notice on all of the leaflets is ____________.)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, invite students to use the frames created by more proficient students to discuss the leaflets (see "For lighter support").
  • In addition to the models of leaflets provided in Work Time A, show several examples of leaflets created by former students and invite students to compare them to the models and recognize strengths and areas for improvement.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support comprehension by activating prior knowledge and scaffolding connections for students. Continue to provide visual display of questions and student responses on chart paper or the board during discussions.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support students in building their writing stamina and effort by providing scaffolds that create an environment conducive to writing.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students who may need additional support with writing may feel uncomfortable sharing their writing with peers and receiving feedback. Continue to promote an inclusive and supportive classroom environment by emphasizing growth and learning rather than relative performance.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • leaflet, design features, in common (L)

Materials

  • Performance Task anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Model emergency preparedness leaflets (one set per pair)
  • Sticky notes (two colors; 10 of each per pair and two for teacher modeling)
  • Paper (blank; one piece per pair)
  • PSA scripts (completed in Unit 1; one per student)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment (copies; completed in Lessons 6-7; one per student)
  • QuickWrite: Emergency Preparedness Food (completed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Research: Supplies to Include in an Emergency Preparedness Kit (completed in Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Opinion essays (completed in Lesson 5; one per student)
  • Devices (one per pair; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Materials for creating leaflets (see Teaching Notes):
    • Paper (blank; several pieces per student)
    • Markers (various colors; one set per pair)
    • Colored pencils (various colors; one set per pair)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer: Performance Task Anchor Chart (5 minutes) 

  • Invite students to move to sit with their writing partner from Lessons 3-5.
  • Direct students' attention to the Performance Task anchor chart and briefly review it.
  • Focus students on the criterion:
    • "Distributing a leaflet for people to take home explaining what they should do in a natural disaster, with a list of things to pack in an emergency preparedness kit"
  • Remind students that in Unit 1 they created PSAs about what to do in a natural disaster, and at the beginning of this unit they researched things to pack in an emergency preparedness kit, so they should have all of the information they need to create this leaflet now.
  • Remind students of the Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart, specifically of applying their learning to help their school and community by educating them about preparing for natural disasters
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with activating prior knowledge: (Activating Prior Knowledge) Turn and Talk:

"What is one thing you wrote about in your PSAs in Unit 1 about how to prepare for a natural disaster? What are one or two items you know to include in an emergency preparedness kit?" (MMR, MME

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the learning target and read it aloud:
    • "I can create an emergency preparedness leaflet to prepare people to be ready for a natural disaster."
  • Underline the word leaflet. Think-Pair-Share:

"What is a leaflet? What is it for?" (It's a printed sheet of paper that is given out for free and contains information.)

  • Tell students they are going to begin by analyzing some authentic emergency preparedness leaflets to generate criteria for their own leaflets.
  • For ELLs: (Synonyms) Invite students to think of synonyms for the word leaflet and then write their suggestions above the word on the learning target (handout, brochure, flier).
  • For ELLs: (Reinforcing Comprehension with Something Familiar) Reinforce comprehension of the word leaflet by inviting students to discuss a time when they were given a leaflet and the information it provided. Ask:
    • "When is a time when you were given a leaflet or a flier of some kind? What information did it provide?"
  • Provide sentence frames for support. Examples:
    • "I was given a leaflet when I went to ______________."
    • "It provided information about _______."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Models: Emergency Preparedness Leaflets (20 minutes) 

  • Distribute and display model emergency preparedness leaflets and sticky notes. Tell students these are real leaflets.
  • Post the questions:
    • "What design features do these leaflets have in common? What makes them effective?"
    • "What information do they all include? Why?"
  • Underline the words design features. Turn and Talk:

"What are design features?" (layout, color, font, font size)

  • Underline the words in common and tell students this means the things that are similar or the same.
  • Write the following examples on two different-colored sticky notes and stick them on a two-column chart drawn on the board: Design/Content.
    • "Design: All of the leaflets are colorful to catch the eye."
    • "Content: All of the leaflets have a list of supplies for a kit."
  • Tell students they are now going to analyze the models to look for design and content elements they have in common. They are going to write each element on a separate sticky note, with design elements and content elements recorded on different-colored sticky notes.
  • Invite students to begin working and circulate to ask questions to guide their thinking:
    • "What information is included on all? Why?"
    • What is similar about the way the information is organized on each one?"
    • "What do you notice about the design of all of them?"
    • "What can you tell me about color?"
    • "What can you tell me about the use of images?"
  • When 5 minutes remain, refocus whole group.
  • Invite volunteer pairs to come and stick one sticky note on the board in either the Content or Design column, avoiding duplication. Look for the following criteria to be represented:
    • Content
      • List of supplies
      • Explains what to do in a natural disaster
    • Design
      • Colorful
      • Not too much text; only the necessary information
      • Clear, easy-to-read font
      • Images to help viewers understand text and make it catch the eye
  • Focus students on the Content column. Remind them that the Performance Task anchor chart says the leaflet should explain what people should do in a natural disaster, with a list of things to pack in an emergency preparedness kit.
  • Add these to the Content column. Refer to the italicized bullet above.
  • Tell students these will be their criteria as they create leaflets.
  • For students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: Invite students to verbally share their ideas on design and content as they analyze the models. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Home Languages) Consider inviting students to discuss the design and content of the leaflets in home language groups. They can then share their observations with the class in English, either orally or on sticky notes.
  • For ELLs: (Providing Definitions) Clarify the meaning of the words content and design by discussing each word and adding a definition under each column heading on the chart for students to refer to as they discuss the leaflets. (Example: Under the Content column, write "Information in the leaflets," and underthe Design column, write "How the leaflets look."
  • For ELLs: (Discussing Presentation of Content) When discussing the content leaflets need to include, focus student attention on the list of emergency items included in each leaflet and invite students to analyze how this information is presented. Ask:
    • "How are the emergency items on the leaflets presented?" (They are written in lists, mostly vertically, with bullets or boxes to check; the items are not listed using complete sentences.)
    • "Why do you think the authors wrote the items in vertical lists?" (It makes them stand out more; they are easy to see and read.)
    • "Why do you think the authors did not use complete sentences to list the items?" (It would be harder to read and see each item if the bullets were written in complete sentences; complete sentences would not make the information clearer to the reader.)
  • Point out that students also need to include information on their leaflet about what to do in a natural disaster, and remind them that they wrote about this in their PSAs in Unit 1. Remind students that the leaflets need to present information in an easy-to-read and clear way in order to be useful. Ask:
    • "What do you think is the best way to present information about what to do in a natural disaster--in a list, in paragraph form, or in some other form? Why?" (Responses will vary, but may include: in a list, starting each bullet with an action word, such as "Build an emergency supply kit," which will emphasize what the reader can and should do and will be easy to read; in one or two brief paragraphs that are easy and quick to read, because people might get overwhelmed by the amount of information in long paragraphs and not read them.)
    • "Do you think the leaflet presentation would be appropriate for other genres, such as a prose narrative or an opinion essay? Why?" (Responses will vary, but may include: no, because narratives and essays do not include action items and lists; no, because a narratives and essays are written in paragraph form using complete sentences.)

B. Partner Writing: Planning and Creating an Emergency Preparedness Leaflet (80 minutes) 

  • Distribute paper.
  • Tell students they are going to begin by working together to plan their emergency preparedness leaflet.
  • Remind students that planning involves sketching out on their paper where things will go. They do not have to add color or detail. Tell students they are going to work together in pairs to create one plan and one leaflet. This leaflet will then be copied for both students.
  • Remind students to refer to the models they analyzed and the criteria generated in the two columns on the board. Also remind them to consider the information included in the following work products as they plan the content they want to include:
    • PSA scripts
    • Copies of opinion essays from the End of Unit 3 Assessment
    • QuickWrite: Emergency Preparedness Food
    • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Research: Supplies to Include in an Emergency Preparedness Kit
    • Opinion essays completed in Lesson 5
  • Set up pairs on devices or point out the materials for creating leaflets and tell students that once they have completed their plan and feel confident the plan meets the criteria on the Performance Task anchor chart and the two columns on the board, they can begin creating their leaflet.
  • Before students begin planning or creating, emphasize high-quality work, since these leaflets will be given out to people who come to see their presentations. Remind students that for people to want to refer to the leaflet to help them prepare for a natural disaster, the information needs to be clear and easy to read and understand. The information also needs to be useful.
  • Suggest that pairs who would like to receive feedback on their plan can find another pair and swap work to provide each other with stars and steps based on the criteria on the board and the Performance Task anchor chart.
  • Invite students to begin. Circulate to support them in planning and creating leaflets. Refer them back to the criteria on the board and all of the work products they have created to ensure that they are including all of the most important information. Provide frequent time reminders to ensure that students are finished by the end of the time.
  • For students who may need additional support with strategy development: Invite students to verbally share one thing from each work product that they will include in their leaflet. Ask:
    • "What do you see in your research from the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment that you will use in creating your leaflet?" (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Planning a Leaflet) Before inviting students to work in pairs, model and think aloud the process for planning a leaflet, showing students how to identify and choose information to include and describing how and where the information will be presented. Say:
    • "My list of emergency items will go on the left side of the leaflet with the heading 'Emergency Kit Supplies; above it. I will add small boxes in front of each item for readers to check off as they add it to their kit. I will also add some illustrations of the items in the middle of the leaflet. On the right side of the leaflet, I will write the heading 'Be Prepared' and under it write two very brief paragraphs about what to do before and during a natural disaster."
  • For ELLs: (Highlighting Key Information) As students plan their leaflets, encourage them to highlight the information in their work products they want to include in their leaflets. Invite them to use one color to highlight information explaining what to do in a natural disaster and another color to highlight items for an emergency kit. This supports them in organizing their thinking and helps them easily find the information when creating their leaflets.
  • For ELLs: (Celebrating Home Languages) Consider pairing students who speak the same home language and encouraging them to create bilingual leaflets. Students can communicate what to do in a natural disaster, with a list of emergency supplies, in English as well as in their home language. This gives the class, school, and community an opportunity to learn from the rich background of ELLs and reinforces the message that home languages and cultures are valued and considered assets in the classroom and school.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Whole Group Share: Emergency Preparedness Leaflets (10 minutes) 

  • Refocus whole group. Tell students that now that they have finished, they are going to circulate to take a look at the other leaflets created by other pairs.
  • Invite students to use sticky notes to leave "stars" as they circulate. Provide an example as necessary: "Colorful and eye-catching!"
  • Emphasize that since the leaflets have been completed and students don't have time to revise, they should not leave "steps" this time.
  • Invite students to begin. Circulate with students and leave feedback stars on sticky notes.
  • When 1 minute remains, refocus whole group. Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the learning target.
  • Tell students that since they are going to unpack an emergency preparedness kit for their performance task presentation in Lesson 12, they need to prepare the two personal items they wrote about in their essays. Emphasize that if students don't own these personal items themselves, they should ask the teacher for help in locating them.
  • For students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: Offer partial dictation for the stars that students wish to leave on classmates' leaflets. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Sentence Starters) Provide sentence starters on the sticky notes for students to complete during the whole group share

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Prepare your two personal items to bring in for Lesson 12 to use in your presentation.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from grades 4 or 6, or record an audio response.

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