Writing a PSA: Analyzing a Model | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M4:U1:L8

Writing a PSA: Analyzing a Model

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.5.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.5.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze a model in order to generate criteria for an effective PSA. (W.5.2, W.5.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Participation in creation of Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart (W.5.2, W.5.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Listening to Model PSAs (20 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria for an Effective PSA (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your Independent Reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • In Opening A, students listen to several example PSAs in order to build an understanding of what a PSA is and the characteristics of one. Several web resources have been provided for selecting example PSAs to share with students--choose 2-3 examples based on the interests or needs of your students. When selecting example PSAs, choose those that have been created for the radio or are audio-only since that is what students are creating. If possible, do not select PSAs about the same natural disasters students have researched since that will be the topic for their PSAs.
  • In Work Time A, students analyze a model PSA to generate criteria for their own PSA (W.5.2, W.5.4). Note: While the process of analyzing the model PSA is similar to the analysis of other writing pieces students have done across the school year, it is not exactly the same since the PSA does not follow a typical essay format. So, the Painted Essay(r) structure is not followed for this writing piece and is not used in the sequence of lessons with students planning and drafting their PSAs.
  • If students used the EL Education modules in grades 3 and 4, they will have written a PSA before, so there will likely be some familiarity with what a PSA is. Note: In this module, the PSA is an informative piece that explains to the audience ways to stay safe during a natural disaster. This differs from the PSAs written in third and fourth grades, which are opinion pieces that convince the audience to take action related to specific social issues.
  • In the Closing, students are guided through a research reading share to hold them accountable for their research reading homework. Consider using the Independent Reading: Sample Plans if you do not have your own independent reading review routines (see the Tools page).
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to contribute to a better world by discussing how PSAs can be used to apply their learning to help the community. They also focus on working to become ethical people by showing integrity during a research reading share.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Throughout the first half of the unit, students have researched a specific natural disaster. This lesson launches how they will use that research: writing a PSA that explains the importance of knowing what to do during a natural disaster, and describes how to stay safe during one.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need support in identifying characteristics of PSAs and understanding the difference between a PSA script and an informative essay. Consider gathering model informative essays from previous modules for students to compare against the model PSA to highlight the similarities and differences between these tasks.

Assessment Guidance:

  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist when students work in pairs in Work Time A or during the research reading share in the Closing. (see the Tools page).

Down the road: 

  • Over the next several lessons, students will write and practice their PSAs. In the next lesson, students will plan their PSAs and draft the introduction.

In Advance

  • Gather example PSAs and prepare the technology necessary to play them for the whole group. If possible, provide students access to the examples on devices (see Technology and Multimedia).
  • Review the Model PSA (for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students over the course of the rest of the unit (see supporting materials).
  • Prepare a research reading share using the Independent Reading Sample Plans or your own independent reading routine (see the Tools page).
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials)

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families, to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families, and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Work Time A: Gather example PSAs and prepare technology to play these examples for the whole group. If possible, provide for students to access on an internet device in pairs. Sources for example PSAs include:
  • Consider that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, teachers should preview them and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, to view the links in the classroom.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.A.4, 5.I.C.10, 5.I.C.11, 5.I.C.12, 5.II.A.1, 5.II.A.2, 5.II.C.6, 5.II.C.7

Important points in the lesson itself 

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing the opportunity for students to view several examples of PSAs in order to gain exposure to what PSAs are and how they engage their viewers, to analyze a model of the work they will complete over the next several lessons, and to better understand the structure of a PSA by comparing and contrasting it with writing they completed in previous modules.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to articulate the similarities and difference between the overall structure of the Model PSA and the overall structure of informative essays from previous modules. Additionally, they may find it challenging to identify key points in the Model PSA during Work Time A. Consider modeling and thinking aloud each process as necessary (seeLevels of Support and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of Support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, challenge students to identify the language that is used to describe each key point in the Model PSA. (Example: key point 1= description of natural disaster; language used to describe key point 1= destructive winds, icing, sleet, and freezing rain)

For heavier support:

  • Consider enlarging the Model PSA and annotating it as students share the gist of each paragraph in Work Time A. Display the Enlarged Model PSA over the next several lessons for students to reference as they plan and write their own PSA scripts.
  • Prepare the Model Essay from Module 3 to display during Work Time A.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students analyze a model PSA before then determining criteria for their own PSAs to be developed in this unit. Students need strong flexible thinking and metacognitive skills as they develop this knowledge. Provide scaffolds to support diverse abilities in using these skills as they make connections from his lesson to the work ahead in this unit.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Continue to support students in monitoring their own progress by asking questions that guide self-monitoring and reflection during each learning activity.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Before students engage in discussions with classmates, continue to foster communication and collaboration discuss strategies for how to give a compliment or ask questions for further understanding

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • public service announcement, informative (L)

Materials

  • Performance Task anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening A and Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Natural Disasters PSA prompt (one per student and one to display)
  • Example PSAs (video or audio; play in entirety; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Model PSA (one per student and one to display)
  • Model PSA (example, for teacher reference)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plans (for teacher reference; see the Tools page)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Listening to Model PSAs (20 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the Performance Task anchor chart and invite students to chorally read it aloud with you.
  • Turn and Talk:
    •  "What are you going to be doing for this performance task?" (share our learning about why its important to be prepared for natural disasters through a presentation where we share a PSA and an emergency preparedness kit)
  • Focus students on the three habits of character anchor charts:
    • Working to Become Effective Learners
    • Working to Become Ethical People
    • Working to Contribute to a Better World
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"Which of these habits of character is this project is helping us to practice? Why?"(Working to Contribute to a Better World because we are applying their learning about natural disasters to create a presentation that will help educate others about how to be prepared for a natural disaster.)

  • Tell students that today they will begin working on the PSA part of the performance task.
  • Direct students' attention to the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart and read the definition of a PSA aloud:
    • "A public service announcement (PSA) is a message directed toward people in a community, used to help them become aware of a social issue."
  • Distribute and display the Natural Disasters PSA prompt and read it aloud.
  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"Before you begin creating a PSA, what would it be helpful to do? Why?" (to listen to a PSA to know what it should include)

  • Play several example PSAs. After playing each, Think-Pair-Share:

"What is this PSA about?" (Responses will vary.)
"What is the purpose of this PSA?" (Responses will vary.)
"What do you like about this PSA? What makes you want to listen to it?" (Responses will vary.)
Conversation Cue: "Can you say more about that?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Distribute and display the Model PSA. Read it aloud, repeating the above sequence of questions. Tell students this PSA is the model they will analyze as they plan and write their own PSAs.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What have you learned today about what a PSA is?"

  • As students share out, capture the characteristics of PSAs on the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart. Refer to the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Playing Example PSAs Twice) Consider playing each example PSA twice; the first time asking students to watch for "gist" and the second time to focus on what they like about the PSA and what makes them want to listen to it. Before playing each PSA a second time, invite students to come up with a gesture, such as touching their nose, for when they see or hear something in the PSA that they like. Pause the PSA when students make this gesture and invite them to share what they saw or heard before continuing the PSA. Record responses on the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart as students share to provide concrete examples of ways to make a PSA engaging. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with information processing: (Noticing Specific Examples) Invite students to notice and share specific examples of sentences they like in the Model PSA, and to explain why they make the PSA engaging. Consider modeling and thinking aloud this process. (Example: Underline the first sentence, starting with "Did you know that...?" and say, "I like that this PSA starts with a question; it is an engaging way to introduce the natural disaster and it makes me think.") Invite students to underline additional sentences they find engaging in the Model PSA and to explain why. Record responses on the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart to provide additional examples of ways to make a PSA engaging. (MMAE

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the learning target and read it aloud:
    • "I can analyze a model in order to generate criteria for an effective PSA."
  • Turn and Talk:

"What do you think you will be doing in this lesson? What makes you think that?"(using a PSA model to generate criteria for our own PSAs)

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with sustained effort: (Recalling Prior Work: Learning Targets) Invite students to share one way they worked toward a similar learning target in previous lessons. (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria for an Effective PSA (25 minutes) 

  • Refocus students on the Model PSA and read aloud the first paragraph.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What is the gist of this paragraph?" (gives background about the natural disaster by describing what it is and the destruction it can cause; clearly states a focus)

  • Cold call students to share out and record the gist next to the first paragraph on the displayed model. Refer to the Model PSA (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to determine the gist of each remaining paragraph.
  • After 5 minutes, refocus whole group and use total participation techniques to select students to share out.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What type of writing is this PSA? How do you know?" (informative; it explains that It is important to know what to do during a blizzard and ways to be prepared for one)

  • Remind students that they have written informative essays throughout the school year. Think-Pair-Share:

"How is the overall structure of this PSA similar to the informative essays we have written this year? How is it different?" (Similarities: both pieces have an introduction that gives background and states a focus about a topic, a middle that develops the topic with facts and details, and a conclusion related to the topic; differences: the essays are in a Painted Essay(r) format, with two proof paragraphs and more elaboration. The PSA is shorter and more informal because it needs to get straight to the point, is meant to be read aloud, and needs to keep the audience engaged.)
"What is the target audience for this PSA? What in the PSA makes you think so?"(The target audience is kids. It gives examples of things kids can do during a blizzard to stay safe. It is uses simple language that is easy for children to understand.)
"What key points did the writer make in this PSA?" (description of the natural disaster, the impact the disaster can have on the people and places that experience it, ways people can stay safe before and during it)

  • Add students' ideas about key points to the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart. Continue to refer to the Characteristics of PSAs anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as necessary
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.

Conversation Cue: "How does our discussion add to your understanding of the PSA? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)
Conversation Cue: "How is what _____said the same as/different from what _____ said? I'll give you time to think and write." (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Enlarged Model PSA: Annotating) As students share the gist of each remaining paragraph of the Model PSA, record it in the margins of the Enlarged Model PSA (see For heavier support), and invite students to do the same on their own copies. (Example: Next to paragraphs 2 and 3 write, "Describes things you can do to stay safe before and during a natural disaster, and the reasons they keep you safe," and next to paragraph 4 write, "Restates the focus and calls the audience to action.") (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: (Displaying Essays Side by Side) Consider displaying the Model Essay from Module 3 next to the Model PSA to support students in comparing and contrasting the overall structure of each. Provide sentence frames for support. Examples:
    • "They are similar because they both ________."
    • "They are different because the Model Essay __________, while the Model PSA ___________." (MMAE)
  • For students who may need additional support with planning for verbal expression: Offer scaffolding by listing questions or cues for students as they share ideas for criteria. (Example: ?How would we ensure that viewers know what we want them to do after watching the PSA??) (MMR, MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chartand remind them specifically of integrity. In the context of research reading home, this means trying to do it each day, even when it is hard to do so, and if it isn't possible, being honest when recording the dates and pages read in your journal.
  • Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plans to guide students through a research reading share or use your own routine.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for expression: (Sentence Frames) Consider displaying sentence frames that correspond with the varying research reading shares, and inviting students to use the frames particular to this lesson's share. (MMAE)
  • For students who may have completed some of the prompts in their independent reading journal orally: Consider meeting with them in advance to prep them for the research reading share and minimize the threat associated with sharing. (MME)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your Independent Reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with written expression: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from Grades 4 or 6, or record an audio response. (MMAE)

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