Discovering Our Topic: Jackie Robinson | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M3:U1:L1

Discovering Our Topic: Jackie Robinson

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • SL.5.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can infer the topic from information in mystery quotes. (RI.5.1)
  • I can support my inferences with details and examples from the mystery quotes. (RI.5.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Participation during Mystery Quotes protocol (RI.5.1, SL.5.1)
  • Participation during unpacking of module guiding questions (RI.5.1, SL.5.1)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Discovering Our Topic: Mystery Quotes (15 minutes)

B. Introducing the Performance Task and the Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

C. Exploring the Text: Promises to Keep (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Launching Independent Reading (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read and reflect on the guiding questions for the module. Talk about them with someone at home. How do the questions make you feel? Why? What do they make you think about? You can sketch or write your reflections.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students participate in the Mystery Quotes protocol to preview the texts for this module and as a way to build schema on the topic of baseball (RL.5.1, SL.5.1).
  • In Work Time B, students consider the module's guiding questions and performance task prompt to help focus their work (see Performance Task Overview). Throughout this module, students revisit the module guiding questions: How have athletes broken barriers during the historical era in which they lived? What factors can contribute to an individual's success in a changing society?
  • Students are introduced to the module anchor text, Promises to Keep, in Work Time C. Be aware that the topics of racial prejudice and segregation presented in the book may be sensitive for students, and that some students may connect with these issues personally and deeply. After exploring the text, students have time to reflect. Monitor students and determine if there are issues surfacing that need to be discussed in more detail as a whole group, in smaller groups, or independently. Be aware that reflections may be personal, and students are not required to share them. Consider providing background information and discussion on racial prejudice slavery, segregation, and civil rights if necessary.
  • Recall that the Mini Language Dive format has changed to reflect a more student-centered approach (see Unit 1 Overview).
  • Recall that the ELL supports within the Meeting Students' Needs column have changed. Each support is labeled and fully explained the first time it is used, then labeled and condensed in subsequent lessons (see Module Overview).
  • This lesson is the first in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 4 Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions teachers can ask students to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O'Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O'Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K-6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 4 Conversation Cues encourage students to think with other students to expand the conversation. Continue drawing on Goal 1-3 Conversation Cues, introduced in Modules 1-2, and add Goal 4 Conversation Cues throughout Modules 3-4 to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. See the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper. Examples of the Goal 4 Conversation Cues you will see in the remaining modules are (with expected responses):
    • To encourage students to compare ideas:
      • Teacher: "How is what _____ said the same as/different from what _____ said? I'll give you time to think and write."
        Student: "_____ said _____. That's different from what _____ said because _____."
    • To encourage students to agree, disagree, and explain why:
      • Teacher: "Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why? I'll give you time to think and write."
        Student: "I agree/disagree because _____."
    • To encourage students to add on to others' ideas:
      • Teacher: "Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think and write."
        Student: "I think that _____."
    • To encourage students to explain others' ideas:
      • Teacher: "Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response? I'll give you time to think and write."
        Student: "I think what she's saying is _____."
  • Note that Goal 4 Conversation Cues are not built into the Discussion Norms anchor chart, because these cues are best suited for teachers facilitating student conversations.
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to become ethical people by showing respect as they reflect on what they read and saw when exploring Promises to Keep.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework helps build both their Vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to baseball and athletes, specifically how athletes have led change. By participating in this volume of reading over time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • This module builds on the foundation established in EL Education Modules 1 and 2 for Grade 5.
  • Students will continue to use their Vocabulary log from Module 1 to collect new Vocabulary in this module. As in Modules 1 and 2, students will add new academic Vocabulary to the front of the log and domain-specific Vocabulary to the back of the log. Consider having students prepare the back of their books for the new module with a new section marked with flags or tabs.
  • The Academic Word Wall will continue to be added to in this module. This is a permanent word wall that is added to across the year.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In Work Time A, students may need additional support making inferences about the mystery quotes.

Assessment guidance:

  • Listen to students' responses as they are inferring the topic and ensure that all students know the topic by the end of the lesson.
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist during students' partner discussions in Work Time A (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist to gather baseline reading fluency data from students' independent reading books during the Closing (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist (Grade 5) to gather data on students' phonics and word recognition skills during students' independent reading during the Closing (see the Tools page).

Down the road:

  • Students will have a chance to share their reflections (if they choose) on the module guiding questions at the beginning of the next lesson.
  • Students begin reading Promises to Keep and determine main ideas of the text in the next lesson.

In Advance

  • Prepare a new domain-specific Word Wall for Jackie Robinson.
  • Consider whether any students may be sensitive to the module guiding questions based on cultural background and how to address them when their at-home reflections are addressed in Lesson 2.
  • Prepare technology necessary to display images or videos of baseball (see Technology and Multimedia).
  • Review the Mystery Quotes Protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Review the Independent Reading: Sample Plan or prepare your own independent reading routine in preparation for launching independent reading during the Closing (see the Tools page).
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1 and 2 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Work Time A: Use a search engine to find images or videos of baseball. Consider that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, be sure to preview links and/or use a filter service, such as SafeShare.tv, for viewing these links in the classroom.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.A.1, 5.I.B.5, and 5.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to explore and discuss the module topic, guiding questions, and anchor text, which provide important and supportive context for the work students will do in this unit and subsequent units in the module.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to read and provide hints about the mystery quotes because of the volume of potentially unfamiliar language and concepts in the quotes. Encourage students to focus on the gist and on language that is familiar. Tell them it is okay if they don't understand everything today, as these quotes are taken from texts and other resources students will encounter in this module, and they will have many more opportunities to engage with them during the module.
  • Racial prejudice and segregation may be particularly sensitive issues for ELLs. Consider getting to know your students and their families' experiences, bringing your awareness of this background into the plan for this module.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Challenge students to create sentence frames for those who need heavier support during the Mystery Quotes protocol in Work Time A. (Examples: This quote is about _________________. One hint to describe this quote is __________. An important part of this quote is __________.)
  • During the Mini Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions.

For heavier support:

  • Consider paraphrasing each mystery quote and including the paraphrases on the quote strips for students to read the during the Mystery Quotes protocol in Work Time A.
  • Encourage students to use the sentence frames created by more proficient students when discussing the mystery quotes (see For lighter support).

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students are introduced to learning targets that may contain unfamiliar Vocabulary terms. When introducing each learning target, consider writing synonyms or sketching a visual above each key term to scaffold students' understanding. Additionally, invite students to share ways in which they worked toward similar targets from previous modules.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): This lesson offers several opportunities for students to engage in discussion with partners. For those who may need additional support with expressive language, facilitate communication by providing sentence frames to help them organize their thoughts. This way, all students can benefit from peer interaction.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students are introduced to the text Promises to Keep. Throughout this unit, sustained engagement and effort is essential for student achievement. Some students may need support to remember the goal for the work they are doing with this text. These students benefit from consistent reminders of learning goals and their value or relevance. Students who may need additional support with sustained effort and concentration are supported when these reminders are built into the learning environment.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • infer, inference, barriers, historical era, factors, contribute, social change (L)

Materials

  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Module 1; added to during the Opening)
  • Domain-Specific Word Wall (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Mystery Quotes strips (one strip per student and one complete list to display)
  • Pictures of baseball (to display; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Performance Task anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Performance Task Overview)
  • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Module Overview)
  • Vocabulary logs (begun in Module 1; one per student)
  • Promises to Keep (one per student and one to display)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plan (for teacher reference; see the Tools page)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can infer the topic from information in mystery quotes."

"I can support my inferences with details and examples from the mystery quotes."

  • Remind students they have seen similar learning targets in Modules 1 and 2.
  • Underline and use the Vocabulary strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart to review and/or determine the meaning of any unfamiliar words. Record any new words on the Academic Word Wall and Domain-Specific Word Wall and invite students to add translations in home languages.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension and engagement: Invite them to share one way they worked toward similar learning targets in Modules 1-2. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Noticing Parts of Speech) Ask: "What is the difference between the words infer and inference?" (Infer is a verb or an action word that means to make an inference. An inference is a noun or a thing. It is the word for a guess that we make based on clues.)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Discovering Our Topic: Mystery Quotes (15 minutes)

  • Build up excitement for this module and unit by explaining that today students will begin learning about a new topic that they will study and write about over the next several weeks.
  • Tell students they will use the Mystery Quotes protocol to make inferences about their new topic of study.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

"What does it mean to infer?" (You use what you know and what the text says to figure out something the author doesn't explicitly say.)

  • Clarify and provide an example as needed. Clarification: "To make an inference, a reader uses what he or she already knows about a topic and combines it with the text he or she read to figure out something that the author does not explicitly tell the reader. It is a guess based on evidence." Example: If someone is crying, you might infer that he or she is sad.
  • Distribute Mystery Quotes strips and pair up students.
  • Without revealing it, invite students to tape their Mystery Quote strip to their partner's back.
  • Ask students to find a new partner.
  • Give students 2 minutes to read the quote on their partner's back. Ask them to think of and provide a hint to their partner as necessary.
  • Give a signal and ask students to find a new partner and repeat.
  • After 12 minutes, refocus the group and ask students to each share a final inference about the meaning of their quote.
  • Display a list of the mystery quotes.
  • Invite students to guess which quote has been taped to their back
  • Debrief using questions similar to the following:

 "What strategies did you use for inferring?" (Responses will vary.)

"What patterns or themes did you notice in all of the mystery quotes?" (There were many about baseball. They were facts.)

"What topic will we be studying throughout this module?" (baseball, athletes)

"What kinds of texts will we be reading and writing in this unit?" (informational, opinion pieces)

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully:

"Who can repeat what your classmate said?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Display pictures of baseball and activate background knowledge about baseball and informative writing by asking:

"What experience have you had with baseball?" (Responses will vary.)

"What do you think about baseball?" (Responses will vary.)

"Does anyone you know have experience with writing informative pieces?" (Responses will vary.)

"What is the translation of baseball in our home languages?" (bangqiu in Chinese)

  • Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation to silently repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.
  • For students who may need additional support with oral language and processing: Strategically partner students to ensure they have a strong, politely helpful partner to support their efforts in sharing their thinking and listening to their partner. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Inferring) Invite a student to role-play the Mystery Quotes protocol with you. Model and think aloud the process for making an inference based on the hint the student provides. Example: "Hmmm, [Lara] said that my quote is about a famous athlete. I don't know who the athlete is, but I wonder if the module topic is going to be about athletes?"
  • For ELLs: (Focusing on One or Two Words) If students are overwhelmed by the language on the Mystery Quotes strips, encourage them to focus on one or two words they recognize on the strips or words that are repeated. Encourage them to think about what hint they might give about the topic based on just those words. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Acting Out Hints) Consider allowing students to act out hints about the mystery quotes rather than describing them.
  • For ELLs: (Providing Background and Making Connections) Be aware that some ELLs may be unfamiliar with the sport of baseball, because it may not a common sport in their country of origin. Tell students that baseball is a popular sport in the United States and explain that they will learn more about it during this module. Encourage students to share the name of a popular sport from their country of origin and encourage them to describe the sport briefly to the class.

B. Introducing the Performance Task and the Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the Performance Task anchor chart and read the task aloud.
  • Turn and Talk, and cold call students to share their responses with the whole group:

"What do you notice?" (We will make a poster showing which personal quality we think is most important to be an effective leader of change.)

"What do you wonder?" (Responses will vary, but may include: What makes someone an effective leader of change?)

"Now that you have analyzed the performance task, has your inference of what this module might be about changed?" (Responses will vary.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 4 Conversation Cue to encourage students to add on to what a classmate said:

"Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think and write." (Responses will vary.)

  • Direct students' attention to the Module Guiding Questions anchor chart and read the questions aloud:
    • "How have athletes broken barriers during the historical era in which they lived?"
    • "What factors can contribute to an individual's success in a changing society?"
  • Tell students that these are the questions that will guide their thinking and learning throughout the module. Underline the words barriers and historical era. Emphasize that they may not know what barriers athletes have overcome yet, but they will learn these things over the course of the unit.
  • Underline the words factor and contribute and invite students to work with an elbow partner to use Vocabulary strategies listed on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart to determine the meanings of these words (factor: one of the causes of something, something that makes a difference in a result; contribute: to play a part in or add to).
  • Add this to the Academic Word Wall and invite students to add to their Vocabulary logs.
  • Turn and Talk and cold call students to share their responses with the whole group:

"What do you notice?" (We will be learning about how athletes have broken barriers and changed society.)

"What do you wonder?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Why will we be learning about this?)

"Now that you have analyzed the guiding questions and performance task, has your inference of what this module is about changed?" (Responses will vary.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 4 Conversation Cue to encourage students to add on to what a classmate said:

"Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think and write." (Responses will vary.)

  • Clarify that this module will be about learning how different athletes have changed society, or how they fought for social change.
  • Tell students that social change is working to make a community or group different in a lasting way. The movement to end slavery and the women's suffrage movement are two examples of social change in the United States. Invite students to share examples of social change that they may be familiar with.
  • Acknowledge that some students may already know something or have opinions about the athletes they will be learning about. Explain that for homework, they will reflect on the guiding questions and how they feel about them based on their own experiences, and that this will be discussed more at the beginning of the next lesson.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the learning targets.
  • For students who may need additional support with sustaining effort: Because students may be overwhelmed by the Performance Task anchor chart, assure them that you will continue to discuss the meaning of the chart in subsequent lessons and units. Consider displaying a model performance task from a former student. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Displaying a Model) Consider displaying a model of a performance task from a former student and invite students to make connections between the information on the Performance Task anchor chart and the information on the model poster.
  • For ELLs: (Checking Comprehension) Check comprehension of the word barriers by inviting students to discuss examples of and the purpose of barriers they are familiar with, such as fences or walls. Explain that the barriers that students will read about in this module are not physical barriers like fences, but have the same effect of separating and isolating people. Invite students to share some barriers they think they might learn about based on information explored in the mystery quotes.
  • For ELLs: (Paraphrasing) After discussing the guiding questions, invite more proficient students to paraphrase them for students who need heavier support. Post the paraphrases underneath the guiding questions for students to refer to throughout the module.

C. Exploring the Text: Promises to Keep (15 minutes)

  • Distribute Promises to Keep and display the cover. Read the text on the cover aloud for the whole group including the subtitle, "How Jackie Robinson Changed America."
  • Ask students to share anything they know anything about Jackie Robinson with the rest of the group.
  • Invite students to open their copies and look at the blurb on the inside cover flap. Read aloud the blurb, inviting students to follow along in their copies.
  • Turn and Talk and use a total participation technique to select students to share their responses with the whole group:

"Now that you have heard the blurb, what do you know about Jackie Robinson?" (He was a baseball player who worked to change his country.)

  • Open the book to page 3 with the picture of Jackie Robinson's plaque from the Baseball Hall of Fame and invite students to turn to this page in their books. Read the text on the plaque aloud, inviting students to follow along in their copies.
  • Turn and Talk and use a total participation technique to select students to share their responses with the whole group:

"Thinking about what you learned from the blurb, and the title of the book, what do you think this picture represents?" (It is the plaque that hangs in the Baseball Hall of Fame honoring Jackie Robinson.)

"Why do you think Jackie Robinson is in the Baseball Hall of Fame?" (He was an incredible baseball player; he was the most valuable player in in 1949 and held several records.)

  • Invite students to take 3 minutes to flip through the pages of their books to see what they notice and what they wonder.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What is one interesting photograph or idea you read in the text?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to spend 3 minutes reflecting silently. Reflection can include thinking or writing/drawing on paper. Students must be silent when they do this, though. Ask:

"What did what you read or saw in the book make you think about? Why?"

  • Invite students to begin reflecting. Circulate to quietly view student reflections in order to be able to address concerns.
  • After 3 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and briefly review what respect looks and sounds like in practice. Ask:

"How do you think respect will help us when we are sharing reflections?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Reflections may include opinions or connections to personal experiences that may be different from our own, so we need to be respectful.)

  • Tell students they will now have the opportunity to share their reflections, if they would like to, with the whole group. Tell them they need to be respectful as they listen to other students sharing. Explain that part of being respectful means treating others with care.
  • Invite volunteers to share their reflections with the whole group. Be prepared to discuss any issues students feel they need to discuss further.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess how well they did with showing respect.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Before reading, provide white boards and dry-erase markers or sticky notes as an option for students to record (in drawing or writing) their ideas. This helps scaffold active listening for key details. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Mini Language Dive) "It looks at the inspiring effect / the legendary Brooklyn Dodger / had on his family, his community ... his country."
    • Deconstruct: Invite students to discuss the meaning of the sentence and grapple with the meaning of each chunk. Encourage extended conversation and practice with the focus structure in the highlighted chunk, keeping the following language goals in mind:
      • It: "What?"/ Meaning: It is the book Promises to Keep. The sentence is about the book. Suggested questions: "What does It refer to in this chunk? How do you know?" (pronoun)
      • looks at: "Does what?"/ Meaning: looks at means to focus on, or to direct attention toward; the book focuses on something. Suggested questions: "What do you think it means that the book looks at something? What, in the sentence, makes you think so? What is another way to say looks at?" (present tense phrasal verb; collocation)
      • the inspiring effect: "At what?" / Meaning: effect means a change caused by something or someone. Inspiring describes effect and means positive or good. The book focuses on the inspiring or positive change caused by someone. Suggested questions: "What does this book look at? What does inspiring effect mean?" (noun phrase)
    • Practice: "How can you say this chunk in your own words?"
    • Reconstruct: Reread the sentence. Ask:

"Now what do you think the sentence means?"

" How does your understanding of this sentence add to your understanding of the text?"

    • Practice: Consider inviting students to use the sentence to speak or write about their own work or lives. Suggestion: ______ looks at the ___________ had on _________. Ask:

"What is another way to say this sentence?"

  • For ELLs: (Noticing Text Features) Invite students to notice the various text features in Promises to Keep (table of contents, photographs with captions, timelines, index). Briefly review the purpose of each text feature, and point out that the photographs, captions, and timelines in the book include important information about the topic and will be important to attend to when reading the book.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Launching Independent Reading (15 minutes)

  • Launch independent reading. Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plan to guide students through selecting books, or use your own routine.
  • For students who may need additional support with recruiting interest: Provide additional time to browse and select a text for reading, while offering an opportunity for students to share how this text will help support their reading goals. (MME0

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read and reflect on the guiding questions for the module. Talk about them with someone at home. How do the questions make you feel? Why? What do they make you think about? You can sketch or write your reflections.
  • For ELLs: (Providing Paraphrases) Consider providing paraphrased guiding questions for students to refer to when discussing them for homework.

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