Establishing Reading Routines: Pages 1–3 of Esperanza Rising | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M1:U1:L2

Establishing Reading Routines: Pages 1–3 of Esperanza Rising

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.5: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • RL.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • RI.5.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • L.5.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.5.5b: Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can describe how pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising contribute to the overall structure of the story. (RL.5.1, RL.5.5)
  • I can select a research reading book that I want to read. (RL.5.10, RI.5.10)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (RL.5.1, RL.5.5)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reflections on Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud and Finding the Gist: Esperanza Rising, Pages 1-3 (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Launching Independent Research Reading (25 minutes)

4. Homework 

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • The lesson begins with students reflecting on the guiding questions. This is not mandatory--students share their reflections only if they want to do so. It is important to be sensitive to students and families' feelings and experiences of human rights and to acknowledge that these feelings and experiences may differ greatly, from very positive to somewhat neutral to very negative.
  • In this lesson, students begin reading Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan. They consider what happens in pages 1-3 of the novel and how those pages contribute to the overall structure of the story (RL.5.1, RL.5.5).
  • Beginning in this lesson and throughout the module, students are invited to translate the Spanish in Esperanza Rising into English. Consider inviting students to also share the translations in other home languages. These practices can encourage language development and help establish academic mindsets and equity.
  • In this lesson, students choose independent research reading books (RL.5.10, RI.5.10). See the Independent Reading: Sample Plans (see the Tools page) for ideas on how to launch independent reading in your classroom. If you have your own routines for launching independent reading, in this lesson students will choose a research reading book.
  • This is the second in a series of two lessons that include built-out instruction for strategic use of the Think-Pair-Share protocol to promote productive and equitable conversation.
  • Total participation techniques are used for quick response questions. Some common total participation techniques include cold calling, selecting volunteers, and using equity sticks (a stick or card for each student in the class).
  • In this unit, the habit of character focus is on working to become ethical people. Throughout the rest of the unit, students will "collect" characteristics of ethical people on a Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart. The characteristic that students collect in this lesson is respect, because of the potentially diverse views of students in response to the guiding questions.
  • Throughout the module as students collect characteristics of each habit of character, examples of what each might look like and sound like are provided in the supporting materials; use these as a guide. Note that they are suggestions, and it is not necessary to include all of the examples on the anchor chart.
  • Beginning in this lesson and throughout much of Unit 1, students are asked to follow along silently as you read the text aloud or to read chorally as a class or with partners. This builds students' fluent reading skills. In this lesson, students follow along, reading silently in their heads as the teacher reads pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising aloud during Work Time A.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to human rights. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In the previous lesson, students were introduced to the module topic by looking at excerpts of Esperanza Rising and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the Infer the Topic protocol.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support rereading the text to determine the gist. Pair students strategically to ensure that each pair includes at least one strong reader.

Assessment guidance:

  • Listen to student book discussions to identify common issues that can be used as whole group teaching points against the criteria recorded on the Discussion Norms anchor chart.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students will read Chapter 1 of Esperanza Rising and the preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Students will also be given vocabulary logs, so prepare these in advance.
  • The Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, world map, and independent reading journals introduced in this lesson will be referred to throughout the module and the school year.

In Advance

  • Strategically pair students for work throughout the lesson, with at least one strong reader per pair.
  • Prepare:
    • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Large class world map showing the countries of the world. Place a pin in your location before the lesson with a small label saying, "We are here."
    • Small label saying, "Esperanza Rising: Introduction" to attach to a pin and place on the world map. This needs to be large enough to see but not so large that it covers up too much of the map.
    • Independent reading journals (one per student).
    • A set of equity sticks for the class (Popsicle sticks with a name of one student on each one).
    • Copy of the independent reading pages of the 5M1 Unit 1 Homework Resources (for families) to display. The pages required are those that show the layout of an entry in the vocabulary log and the page of independent reading prompts.
  • Review:
    • Independent Reading: Sample Plans in preparation for launching independent reading in this lesson (see the Tools page).
    • Think-Pair-Share and Thumb-O-Meter protocols (see Classroom Protocols).
  • Post: Learning targets, and Module Guiding Questions anchor chart, and Discussion Norms anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Opening A: Create the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart in an online format--for example, a Google Doc--to share with families to reinforce habits of character at home.
  • Opening B: Create the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart in an online format--for example, a Google Doc--to share with families to reinforce reading skills at home.
  • Work Time A: Create the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart in an online format--for example, a Google Doc--to display.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.6, 5.I.B.8, and 5.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by establishing an environment of respect for diverse perspectives on human rights; pairing students and allowing time for thought and discussion during each task; and providing time to investigate vocabulary. Students are invited to determine the gist of the first pages of Esperanza Rising, a book that acknowledges, celebrates, and reflects on the diversity of Mexican culture, while noticing and investigating how Pam Munoz Ryan, the Mexican-American author of Esperanza Rising, infuses the English text with Spanish.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to determine the gist of pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising because of the volume of potentially unfamiliar new language. Remind them of the strategies from Lesson 1 for approaching unfamiliar texts. Invite them to pat themselves on the back for what they do understand. Once students understand the gist, take them to the next level by modeling and thinking aloud through the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (see the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite students to investigate why the author uses Spanish in Esperanza Rising. (Examples: To celebrate bilingualism, reflect Esperanza's home language, show that people speak and write in different languages, and make the story more interesting and meaningful.)
  • Invite a student to paraphrase the events of Esperanza Rising and the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart in more comprehensible language for those who need heavier support.
  • In Work Time A, challenge students to generate questions about the proverb in Esperanza Rising before asking the prepared questions. (Example: "What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let's see if we can answer them together.")
  • Encourage students to independently create a graphic organizer to chart (and illustrate) the events in pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising against the structure of the story. Invite them to explain this graphic organizer to students who need heavier support.

For heavier support:

  • Display, repeat, and rephrase key questions throughout the module. Consider slowing your rate of speech without increasing natural volume or intonation.
  • Ask students before class if they would like to share their reflections during Opening A. Invite them to practice with you or a peer, helping them to rephrase any language that prevents comprehension of their intended message.
  • During the reading for gist, stop often to check for comprehension. Dictate sentences for students to recite so that they practice using verbal language. Encourage them to act out and sketch key sentences.
  • Transform the investigation of the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart into a kinesthetic activity. Copy the parts and the descriptions of the parts onto separate strips. Students can paste the descriptions into the correct part: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students begin to discuss the text structure of Esperanza Rising. Analyzing the structure of a new text may be challenging for some students. To activate prior knowledge, review text structure with a familiar and less complex text such as a previous read-aloud or known fairy or folk tale before the lesson. This helps students to generalize this skill with an unfamiliar text.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Because Esperanza Rising is an unfamiliar text and may be above some students' independent reading level, they may need supports to facilitate comprehension. Consider chunking parts of the reading selection for this lesson and checking for understanding after each chunk.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): When introducing the lesson, remind students that this is an unfamiliar text and that it is okay if they do not understand everything at first. Also, help students develop their independent reading stamina by offering predetermined breaks with a choice of appropriate activity (see the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • human rights, proverb, gist (L)

Materials

  • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening A)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Equity sticks (class set; one per student)
  • Esperanza Rising (one per student)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • I Notice/I Wonder Note-catcher: Inferring the Topic (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A)
  • Labeled pin (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Compass points (one to display)
  • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A)
  • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plans (see the Tools page; for teacher reference)
  • Independent reading journals (one per student)
  • 5M1 Unit 1 Homework Resources (for families; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflections on Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

  • Move students into pairs and invite them to label themselves partner A and partner B.
  • Remind students that in the previous lesson they were introduced to the guiding questions for the module. Invite them to reread the Module Guiding Questions anchor chart.
  • Remind students what human rights are.
  • Explain that some students may have had experiences in which their human rights were threatened and that we need to be respectful of that.
  • If appropriate, to help build trust, consider sharing a personal story regarding your experiences with threats to human rights.
  • Remind students that for homework they were asked to reflect on what those guiding questions mean to them and how they feel about them.
  • Invite students to share their reflections with the whole group if they wish. This must be voluntary; if no one wants to share, that is okay. Explain to the rest of the group that they need to be respectful as they listen to other students sharing. Explain that part of being respectful is treating others with care.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart. Explain, as it says at the top of the anchor chart, that ethical people treat others well and stand up for what is right.
  • Read aloud the habit of character recorded:
    • "I show respect. This means I appreciate the abilities, qualities, and achievements of others and treat myself, others, and the environment with care."
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner:

"Using the anchor chart as a guide, what does respect mean in your own words?" (appreciating what I and others are good at and treating everyone with care)

  • Tell students they will now use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to discuss their ideas with a partner. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 1 and review the steps. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol:
    • Ask the first question (below) and give students think time.
    • Invite partner A to ask partner B the question.
    • Give partner B 20 seconds to share his or her response.
    • Invite partner B to ask partner A the question and give partner A 20 seconds to share his or her response.
    • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group.
    • Repeat this process with the next question.

"What does respect look like? What might you see when someone is showing respect to someone else?"

"What does respect sound like? What might you hear when someone is showing respect to someone else?"

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the appropriate column on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart. Refer to Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Record ethical people and respect on the Academic Word Wall. Invite students to add translations of the words in their home languages in a different color next to the target vocabulary.
  • Once again, remind students of the habit of character focus: respect.
  • For ELLs: Say and spell respect aloud. Tell students that the words show and respect are often used together (collocation) and can be learned as a phrase, e.g., "I show respect." Invite students to investigate additional collocations with show and respect (e.g., "clearly show" or "lose respect").
  • Consider providing some visual examples of showing respect. These can be images, short videos, or role-play simulations. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Check comprehension by asking students to describe any ethical people they know. Ask them how these ethical people show respect. Invite them to demonstrate what respect looks and sounds like. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with new vocabulary: Consider adding simpler synonyms to the Word Wall in a lighter color next to the target vocabulary. (MMAE)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can describe how pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising contribute to the overall structure of the story."

"I can select a research reading book that I want to read."

  • Guide students through the steps of the Think-Pair-Share protocol, leaving adequate time for each partner to think, ask the question, and share. Then, use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What do you think you are going to be doing in this lesson? Why do you think that? Use evidence from the learning targets to support your answer." (reading pages 1-3 of a book called Esperanza Rising, describing how those pages contribute to the overall structure of the story, and choosing a research reading book)

"What questions do you have about these learning targets?" (Responses will vary, but may include: What is Esperanza Rising about?)

  • Write student questions on the board to revisit later.
  • For ELLs: Consider pairing students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames, for example.
  • Provide differentiated mentors by purposefully pre-selecting student partnerships. You may need to coach the mentors to engage with their partner and share their thought process. This can be done during questioning as you circulate the room. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Mini Language Dive. Ask about the meaning of the learning targets. Write and display student responses next to the learning target. Examples:
    • "What is the gist of the second learning target?" (Responses will vary.)
    • "Place your finger on structure. What is the translation of structure in our home languages? What is the meaning of the structure of a story?" (szerkezet in Hungarian; the organization of a story)
    • "What will you describe?" (how pages 1-3 contribute to the overall structure of the story)
    • "Can you think of another way to say contribute to in the second learning target?" (help create)
    • "What is an example of story structure?" (beginning, middle, end)
    • "Now what do you think is the gist of the second learning target?" (I can discuss the way the structure of Esperanza Rising is shown in these pages.) (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud and Finding the Gist: Esperanza Rising, Pages 1-3 (20 minutes)

  • Distribute Esperanza Rising. Write the word gist on the board. Tell students that they will begin working with this text today, and that they will start by reading the first few pages for gist.
  • Tell students that the gist is what the text is mostly about and remind them that we determine the gist of a new text so that we understand what it is mostly about. Also, when we determine the gist of sections of the text, it helps us to understand the structure.
  • Record the word gist on the Academic Word Wall and invite students to add translations in home languages.
  • Direct students' attention to the new Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. Explain that there are strategies for reading new texts on this anchor chart. Focus students on "finding the gist" to the anchor chart and tell them this is the strategy they will practice in this lesson.
  • Tell students they will now spend 2 minutes looking through the book with their partner and discussing what they notice and wonder about Esperanza Rising. Partner B will share a notice or a wonder first, and then partner A, and then partner B again, and so on. Remind students of the Discussion Norms anchor chart and that they should follow these norms whenever they have a discussion.
  • Display the I Notice/I Wonder Note-catcher: Inferring the Topic from Lesson 1.
  • Use equity sticks to select students to share out what they notice and wonder about the book. As students share out, capture their ideas on the displayed note-catcher. Listen for suggestions such as:
    • I notice that there is a language other than English in the book.
    • I notice that the chapters aren't numbered. Instead they have the names of fruit and vegetables in English and in a different language.
    • I notice some words are typed in a different font.
    • I wonder what language the non-English language is.
    • I wonder if Esperanza is the name of a character.
  • Ask students to turn to the page that begins with "To the memory of...." Invite them to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read aloud the text at the top of this page. Read slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner and use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What does this tell you about this book?" (The author has dedicated this book to someone, and that person has the same name as the title of the book and also one of the same names as the author, Munoz.)

  • Point out the words mi abuelita and record them in the Spanish column on the Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart.
  • Select volunteers to share with the group what this means in English (my grandmother). Record this in the English column on the anchor chart. If no-one knows the meaning, it will become clear in the book, and can be added later.
  • If they know the meaning of my grandmother in other home languages, record in the third column of the anchor chart. 
  • Invite students to turn to the next page and follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read aloud. If you have Spanish-speaking students in the group, invite a volunteer to read the Spanish words aloud for the whole group. Ensure students understand that the English is the translation of the words in Spanish.
  • Point to the word proverb at the bottom of the page. Ask students to turn and talk with their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What is a proverb?" (a saying that often gives a piece of advice)

  • Add this word to the Academic Word Wall and invite students to add translations in home languages.
  • Focus students on the first proverb: "He who falls today may rise tomorrow."
  • Guide students through the steps of the Think-Pair-Share protocol, leaving adequate time for each partner to think, ask the question, and share:

"What do you think this means?" (Even if something bad happens, things can still get better.)

  • Repeat with the second proverb on the page: "The rich person is richer when he becomes poor, than the poor person when he becomes rich." (Richness isn't about money, but about what you learn.)
  • Focus students on page 1 and read the title aloud.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What do we know about this part of the book?" (The setting is Aguascalientes, Mexico, in 1924, nearly 100 years ago.)

  • If you have Spanish speakers in the class, invite students to translate what Aguascalientes means in Spanish (hot water) and add this to the Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart. If you don't have Spanish speakers, tell students what it means.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Where is Mexico on the map?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students that Aguascalientes is a real place in north-central Mexico. It is a state, and it gets its name from the hot springs in the area.
  • Place the labeled pin on Aguascalientes and explain that it is in the continent of North America. Show students each of the continents on the map.
  • Display the compass points. Tell students that they can use compass points to explain where places are. Read through each of the compass points.
  • Point to the pin marking your location.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"Which continent do we live on?" (Responses will vary.)

"Where are we in relation to Mexico?" (Responses will vary, but students should use the compass points.)

"Has anyone had any experience with Mexico that they would like to share?" (Mexico or neighboring countries, such as the United States, will likely be the country of origin for many students.)

  • If appropriate, to help build trust, consider sharing a personal story regarding your experiences, if any, with Mexico.
  • Focus students' attention back on the text and invite them to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising aloud.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What do you know from these first few pages?" (There is a female character called Esperanza who is 6 and her father, and they grow grapes in a valley.)

"What is the gist of these pages? What is this section of the book mostly about?" (Responses may vary, but may include that Esperanza's father helps her to hear the heartbeat of the land.)

  • Refocus students on the Spanish that Papa says on page 2. Invite them to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"What do you notice about the Spanish text?" (It is written in a different font.)

"What does it mean? How do you know?" (Wait a little while, and the fruit will fall into your hand. The text says it underneath.)

"What do you call this? Think back to the page of proverbs." (a proverb)

"What does this proverb mean?" (Be patient and you will get what you want.)

  • Direct students' attention to the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart and focus them on the key at the top of the page: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution. Tell students that each of these is a different part of a story.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"Which of these five parts of a story applies to pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising? How do you know?" (exposition; because it is the start of a story, before the action begins)

  • Draw a horizontal line at the bottom of the anchor chart to reflect this and label it. Refer to Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite them to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"How did finding the gist help you to better understand the text?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students they are now going to use the Thumb-O-Meter protocol to think about how close they feel they are to meeting the first two learning targets. Inform them that they will hear the first learning target read aloud. They will then show their comfort level by holding their thumb up, down, or sideways. By holding their thumb up, they are indicating that they are comfortable or have done this before. By holding their thumb sideways, they are indicating that they think they will need some support. By holding their thumb down, they are indicating that they feel uncomfortable with what is described or have never done it before. They will then repeat this process with the second learning target. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Reassure students that it is okay to hold a thumb sideways or down--they will have the opportunity to practice these skills throughout the unit.
  • Answer clarifying questions.

Focus students on the first learning target and read it aloud:

"I can determine the gist of pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising."

  • Invite students to show their comfort level using a thumbs-up, -down, or -sideways.
  • Scan student responses and make a note of those showing a thumbs-sideways or thumbs-down, so you can check in with them moving forward.
  • Repeat this process with the second learning target.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of chunks from a key sentence of this chapter of Esperanza Rising. Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:
    • "Place your finger on the proverb: Wait a little while and the fruit will fall into your hand." Read the proverb aloud as students follow along.
    • "What is the gist of this proverb?" (Responses will vary.)
    • "Is the author talking about real fruit? What, in the text, makes you think so?" Tell students that you will give them time to think and write or sketch before you cold call. (No. She is talking about being patient as Esperanza waits to hear the heartbeat of the land.)
    • "What is the author comparing fruit to?" (to something Esperanza wants, like hearing the heartbeat)
    • "Place your finger on and. I wonder why the author writes and here." Tell students you will give them time to think and discuss with their partner. (And joins two independent clauses; it links two complete sentences into one more sophisticated one that shows a sequence of events.)
    • "What does this proverb mean to your life? What fruit in your life would you like to wait for until it falls into your hand?" (Responses will vary.)
    • "Can you figure out why the author uses a proverb instead of saying exactly what she means, literally?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Proverbs are more poetic, more interesting, and invite contemplation.)
    • "Now what do you think is the gist of this proverb?" (Be patient and you will get what you want when the time is right.) (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Display and repeat the question: "Which of these five parts of a story applies to pages 1-3 of Esperanza Rising? How do you know?" Rephrase the question. (Example: "Think about pages 1-3. Are these pages the resolution? Why?")
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: To ensure that the general purpose of understanding structure is clear, tell students that there are different types of narrative structures, but Esperanza Rising follows the one in the anchor chart. Cue students to problem-solve: "Can you figure out why we want to understand structure?" Tell students you will give them time to think and discuss with their partner. (Responses will vary, but may include: to know what to expect as the story progresses.) (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: Using the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart to discuss Esperanza Rising can be cognitively and linguistically demanding. Consider easing the linguistic demands by inviting students to first discuss the paragraph in home language groups. Students who do not have a home language in common can be given additional time to think or write in their home language. Given the initial time to reflect and discuss in their home language, which may also help create a sense of equity, students can then discuss in English.
  • For ELLs: The "thumbs-up" and related signals may be offensive in some cultures. Explain to entering ELLs that these signals are okay in the United States or ask the class to develop signals that are acceptable in all cultures.
  • For students who may feel uncomfortable sharing their progress on meeting the learning targets publicly: Minimize risk by providing students with a sheet of paper on which they can select a color, number, or symbol for each learning target in private. This provides useful data for future instruction and helps students to monitor their own learning. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Launching Independent Research Reading (25 minutes)

  • Launch independent reading. There is a suggested independent reading launch in the Independent Reading: Sample Plans.
  • At the end of 5 minutes, distribute independent reading journals.
  • Tell students they will use this journal to log their independent reading, both choice and research reading, and to answer reading prompts.
  • Display the independent reading pages of the 5M1 Unit 1 Homework Resources (for families) and focus students on the information they need to record using the example on the same page.
  • Model how to log independent reading without the prompt. Explain that they will log their research reading in the front of the book and choice reading in the back. Ensure that students understand the difference between independent research reading (topical texts) and choice reading (any texts they want to read).
  • Explain that they will respond to a prompt for homework in the front of their journal and show students where to find the prompts in the homework resources document.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Thumb-O-Meter protocol to reflect on the final learning target. Remind them that they used this protocol earlier in the lesson and review as necessary. Reassure students that it is okay to hold a thumb sideways or down. This is the beginning of the year, and they may not be sure about the book they have chosen yet.
  • Guide students through the protocol using the final learning target. Note students showing a thumbs-sideways or thumbs-down so you can check in with them frequently to see how they are getting on with their research texts.
  • Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they showed respect in this lesson.
  • For students who may need additional support with reading stamina: Provide opportunities to take breaks at predetermined points. Let them choose from a list of appropriate break activities (e.g., getting a drink of water, stretching, etc.). (MME)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: For all homework assignments in this unit, read the prompts aloud and rephrase them. Students can discuss and respond to prompts orally, either with you, a partner, family member, or student from Grades 4 or 6, or record an audio response. If students have trouble writing sentences, they can begin by writing words. Consider providing a sentence starter or inviting students who need lighter support to provide sentence starters. (MMAE, MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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