Planning a PSA: Storyboarding | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M4:U3:L4

Planning a PSA: Storyboarding

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • SL.3.4: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can determine the capabilities and limitations of the technology tools available to create my PSA. (SL.3.4)
  • I can create a storyboard to accompany my video PSA. (SL.3.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Storyboard for PSA (SL.3.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Writer: Watching a Model PSA (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Planning a PSA: Exploring Technology (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Planning a PSA: Storyboard (25 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Opening A, students watch the model PSA again, this time thinking about the technology tools used. This is to prepare students to think about the technology they are going to use for their video PSAs (SL.3.4).
  • In Work Time A, students explore the technology tools that will be available to them to create their PSAs. The purpose of this is to help students be realistic about what they can do with their PSAs (see Technology and Multimedia) (SL.3.4). Due to the time and planning it takes to create a high-quality PSA video product, students do not have the opportunity to practice creating a PSA before they have to create the final PSA for the end of unit assessment. Significant time has been allocated for this assessment in Lessons 8-10 (three lessons); however, the technology exploration in this lesson is the only practice they will have with the technology before the assessment. If you feel students will need more practice with technology tools before creating their PSAs, consider extending this exploration time.
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to contribute to a better world by taking care of and improving the environment and applying their learning to help the environment when planning their PSAs. They also focus on working to become effective learners on a characteristic of their choice.
  • To provide tech-savvy students with additional challenge, consider allowing them to use more complex tools (e.g., animation tools) or more complex technological techniques (e.g., stop-motion).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 3, students wrote their PSA scripts. In this lesson, they consider the visuals they will use to accompany their scripts and plan them out on a storyboard.

Assessment guidance:

  • Observe students using technology and identify common issues to use as teaching points for the whole group.
  • Review students' storyboards and ensure that students have realistic plans for their video PSAs based on the technology available. Also determine who, what, and where each pair will need to create their PSAs to assist students in making sure those people/artifacts are available.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need support using the technology tools. Consider grouping those who need additional support and inviting a technology teacher to give guidance.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students prepare to invite guests to the live launch of their video PSAs. They plan an invitational letter, which they will write for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 6.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Technology necessary to play the model PSA (see Technology and Multimedia).
    • Technology tools for students to explore the capabilities and limitations of the tools available (see Technology and Multimedia). Choose two technology tools to use with students and learn how to use the basic functions in order to give basic tutorials.
  • Determine any limitations you will impose on students' PSAs. As much as possible, allow students to be creative and provide them with the support they require; however, ensure that students are clear about the limitations when they are planning.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Opening A: Prepare technology to play the model PSA for the whole group, and if possible for students to access on an internet device in pairs:
  • Work Time A: Prepare the technology tools for students to explore the capabilities and limitations of the tools available. One device per pair, preferably with internet access. Options could include, but are not limited to:
    • Google Slides: Students create a slideshow highlighting their issue, and then either record a voiceover, or video-record themselves presenting it live to create the voiceover. 
    • Video recorder: Students record a simple video with a voiceover including either people and water sources, drawings like the model PSA, or even action figures moved around.
    • Video editing software such as iMovie or Windows Movie Maker: Students use a videorecorder to record video, and then edit it using a simple editing tool.
    • Shadow Puppet Edu (app for Apple products): Students create a simple shadow puppet show. 
    • Powtoon: Students create a simple animation. 
  • Closing: Each pair will need access to a timing device with minutes and seconds

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.B.6, 3.I.C.11, 3.I.C.12, 3.II.A.1, 3.II.A.2

Important points in the lesson itself 

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by building on work begun in previous lessons; inviting students to use vocabulary strategies to determine the meaning of new words; including translations of new words in students' home languages on the Academic Word Wall; and providing students with the opportunity to work with a partner throughout the lesson.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to keep pace with the class in completing their storyboards during the Closing and Assessment. Consider working with a small group of students after working with the class and help them create their storyboards together. Additionally, consider inviting partners to read and time their PSA scripts together, but then to divide up the storyboard boxes, with each completing three boxes independently, rather than all six boxes together.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Before providing additional modeling during the Closing and Assessment, observe student interaction and allow them to grapple. Provide supportive demonstrations only after students have grappled with the task. Observe the areas in which they struggle to target appropriate support.

For heavier support:

  • Consider creating a note-catcher for students to complete during Work Time A, complete with the following three columns: Technology Tool, Capabilities, and Limitations. Under Technology Tool, include a row for each technology tool that students will explore. Invite students to jot down the capabilities and limitations of each tool on this note-catcher after discussing them with their partner. This supports students in weighing the pros and cons of each technology tool after exploring them all, helping them to select the best one with which to create their PSA.
  • During the Closing, consider displaying a visual of a completed storyboard, providing students with a concrete example of the type of work they will complete.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support active information processing skills as students integrate new information with prior knowledge. Provide options for comprehension by linking to and activating relevant prior knowledge.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support a range of fine motor abilities and writing needs by offering students options for writing utensils.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to support students' engagement and self-regulatory skills during peer interactions by modeling and providing sentence frames as necessary.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • capabilities, limitations, accompany, storyboard (L)

Materials

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Model PSA (video; play in entirety; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Module 1)
  • Vocabulary logs (from Module 1; one per student)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Parts of Speech anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Devices (one per pair; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Storyboard graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • PSA scripts (completed in Lesson 3; one per student) Timers (one per pair)
  • Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer: Watching a Model PSA (5 minutes) 

  • Invite students to pair up with their PSA partner.
  • Invite students to retrieve their End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt and review it as necessary.
  • Remind students of the corresponding habits identified on the Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart:
    • I take care of and improve our shared spaces and the environment.
    • I apply my learning to help our school, the community, and the environment.
  • Post and read aloud the question:

"What do you notice about the technology used to create this PSA?" (Responses may vary, but may include: They filmed someone drawing and added a voiceover.)

  • Play the model PSA.
  • Direct students' attention to the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart.
  • Turn and Talk:

"According to the chart we put together, what are the next steps?" (explore the technology and plan the visuals)

  • For ELLs: (Linking Words and Phrases: Referencing Handout) Encourage students to use temporal words and phrases from their Linking Words and Phrases handout as they share the next steps of the video PSA presentation process (e.g., next, after that).

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

"I can determine the capabilities and limitations of the technology tools available to create my PSA."

"I can create a storyboard to accompany my video PSA."

  • Underline the words capabilities and limitations in the first target and accompany in the second target.
  • Focus students on the vocabulary strategies listed on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart and invite them to use a strategy to determine the meaning of these three words.
  • Use a total participation technique to select students to share the definition and the strategy they used with the whole group. Add these words to the Academic Word Wall, including translations in home languages, and invite students to add the words to their vocabulary logs (capabilities: what someone or something is able to do; limitations: what someone or something is unable to do--where it is limited; accompany: go with)
  • Focus students on the second learning target and underline the word storyboard.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What do you think a storyboard might be?" (a series of pictures showing the order of events in a film)

  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and invite them to read the habits of character on the chart to themselves. Tell students to choose a habit to focus on as they work with their classmates today. Cold call students to share with the whole group and select one as a class.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Invite students to rephrase or restate the learning targets using more familiar language or synonyms. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: (Reinforcing Comprehension with Something Familiar) Reinforce comprehension of the words capabilities and limitations by inviting students to think of some of their own capabilities and limitations. Provide sentence frames for support. (Example: One of my capabilities is ______ [being able to read and understand grade level texts]. One of my limitations is ______ [not being able to reach the top bookshelf].)
  • For ELLs: (Noticing Compound Words) Invite students to repeat the word storyboard. Ask them what individual words they hear in this word (story + board), reminding them that sometimes one word is made from two or more words. Invite students to predict the meaning of storyboard based on the individual words within it. Ask students to identify the part of speech of storyboard and to explain its function in the learning target. (Storyboard is a noun, telling the thing students will be creating.) Add storyboard as an example of a noun on the Parts of Speech anchor chart from Unit 1.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Planning a PSA: Exploring Technology (25 minutes)

  • Set pairs up on or with devices. Provide tutorials on the basic features of one or two simple tools they can use to create their PSAs.
  • Tell students they are going to have the rest of the time to practice using the tools to determine the capabilities and limitations of each. Point out other tool options for those students who would like additional challenge, but emphasize that it isn?t the tool that will make an effective PSA. It is the way they use it, so they will be more effective using a simpler tool well than using a complex tool badly.
  • Emphasize that this exploration is not the time for them to begin creating their PSAs; this is a time for them to become familiar with the tools and to gain an understanding of what is realistically possible with each tool before they get into the next stage of planning their PSAs.
  • Invite students to begin and circulate to support them in exploring the tools. Ask questions to guide student exploration:

"What are you able to do with this tool? How will this help you create your PSA?"

"What are you unable to do with this tool? How will this limit you in creating your PSA?"

  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.
  • For students who may need additional support with sustained focus: Provide questions on index cards as a reference for students as they explore technology:

"What are you able to do with this tool?"

"How will this help you create your PSA?"

"What are you unable to do with this tool?"

"How will this limit you in creating your PSA?" (MME)

  • For ELLs: (Note-catcher for Capabilities and Limitations) Consider inviting students to use the note-catcher suggested in "For heavier support" to record the capabilities and limitations of each technology tool. Under Capabilities, invite students to write the sentence starter: "This tool will help me by _____." Under Limitations, invite students to write the sentence starter: "This tool will limit me by _____." Invite students to place a mark, such as a star, next to the technology tools that they think would be the most helpful to them in creating their PSAs, supporting them in their decision of which one to use as they create their PSAs in Lessons 8-10.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Planning a PSA: Storyboard (25 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have explored the technology, they can be more realistic about what they can do to create the video visuals for their PSA.
  • Distribute and display the Storyboard graphic organizer.
  • Point out that the big white boxes are for them to draw a picture of the event happening at that point in time, and the smaller shaded box below is for them to record a brief description of who, what, and where.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What does 'Who?' mean?" (who is going to be in the scene)

"What does 'What?' mean?" (what the person/thing is doing)

"What does 'Where?' mean?" (where the person/thing is doing it)

  • Emphasize that at this stage, students need to get quite clear on who, what, and where, and they need to be specific. For example, if they would like an adult to act something out, they will need to ask that adult and prepare him or her to do it.
  • Provide students with the limitations appropriate to your situation. (Example: Students can record only in the classroom or in the school building, etc.)
  • Point out that there are six boxes, one for each 10-second section of a PSA lasting 1 minute.
  • Invite students to retrieve their PSA scripts. Explain that to make sure they know what is happening in each 10-second block of time in their PSA, they need to time themselves to know where they will be in the script.
  • Distribute timers. Invite one student to read the script through while the other uses the timer and makes a mark on the script wherever the reader is on the 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-second marks. This mark could be an asterisk in a different color. Remind the students reading the scripts to follow the Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart as they read to ensure that it is a realistic read-aloud, like the one they will use when they record their PSAs.
  • After a couple of minutes, refocus whole group. Tell students that now that they know where they are in the script for each 10-second block, they can begin to think about what is happening in the video in those sections based on what is happening in the script. Emphasize that the visuals and the script need to match.
  • Tell students that the descriptions need to explain who/what will be in the scene--for example, a live recording of people acting? And if so, who will they be? Will they use action figures? And if so, how will this affect the script?
  • Ensure students understand that this is just a planning sheet--they will draw one drawing in each box to represent what is happening in the video at that point in the PSA, but the drawings don?t need to be perfect artwork, and the description doesn't need to be in full sentences. They can be sketches and brief notes, as long as the students themselves can understand what they mean, as they will use this graphic organizer to create their PSAs later on in the unit.
  • Invite students to begin planning their visuals.
  • Circulate to support students. Ask questions to guide their thinking and to help them be realistic about what they can achieve given the capabilities and limitations of the technology they will use:

"What is happening at that point in your script?"

"What visuals might represent that?"

"How are you going to create that visual? Are you going to act it out? Are you going to ask others to act it out while you record? Use action figures? Or use animation?"

  • When 2 minutes remain, use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the second learning target and how well they demonstrated the habit from the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart that they decided to focus on today.
  • For students who may need additional support with strategy development for writing: Invite students to verbally share their "big picture" idea for the script. Provide scaffolds by scribing the ideas in sequence as needed. This provides a concrete starting point for the organization of ideas and development of the PSA script. (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Choral Reading: Timing the Script) Invite students to retrieve their copy of the model PSA script and to chorally read it together, stopping every 10 seconds to make a mark on their scripts. This minimizes confusion about the activity and supports students with practice reading a PSA at an appropriate pace before reading and timing their own PSAs.
  • For ELLs: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Creating a Storyboard) Model and think aloud the process for completing a storyboard, based on the model PSA script. To do so, consider playing the model PSA and pausing it at the 10-second mark, just after the words "light energy and heat energy." Say: "In the first white box, I will draw an image for the first 10 seconds of the script only. Below it, in the shaded box, I will write 'Who = a boy and his dog; What = Smiling because they are receiving energy; and Where = outside underneath the sun.'" Invite students to complete the second box of the storyboard for the model PSA together before they begin working on their own storyboards.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from grades 2 or 4, or record an audio response.

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