End of Unit 3 Assessment: Water Issue Video PSA | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M4:U3:L10

End of Unit 3 Assessment: Water Issue Video PSA

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • W.3.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • SL.3.4: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
  • SL.3.6: Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can use my plans to create a high-quality video PSA with a partner. (RI.3.1, SL.3.4, SL.3.6)
  • I can critique my peers' PSA and provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback. (W.3.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Water Issue Video PSA (RI.3.1, SL.3.4, SL.3.6)
  • Stars and steps on sticky notes (W.3.5)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 3 Assessment: Water Issue Video PSA (140 minutes)

B. Returning Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Peer Critique: PSA (30 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students complete the end of unit assessment, during which they use their plans to create their video PSAs. This assessment has been combined into three lessons, because ideally students would have a significant block of uninterrupted time in which to work on their PSAs. It also ensures adequate time to pause the work to address common issues whole group. If it is not possible to provide students with this time in one block and the lessons need to be facilitated separately, ensure that the learning targets are reviewed again at the beginning of Lessons 9-10 (RI.3.1, SL.3.4, SL.3.6). Students may need to move around the building to film water sources. Consider how to support this possibility.
  • In Work Time B, student's Mid-Unit 3 assessments are returned with feedback. This has been deliberately placed after students create the PSA, rather than at the beginning of the lesson as it would normally be, to provide sufficient time for assessing student work and providing feedback before returning it. However, if these three lessons are taught in one block of time in one day immediately after the mid-unit assessment, consider moving this to a later lesson to ensure adequate time for assessment and feedback after the mid-unit assessment.
  • In the Closing, students peer-critique and revise their PSAs using the Criteria for an Effective Video PSA anchor chart. Significant time has been allocated to this peer critique to allow students time to revise their PSAs accordingly after the critique (W.3.5).
  • Students focus on working to contribute to a better world by taking care of and improving the environment and applying their learning to help the environment when creating their PSAs. They also focus on working to become ethical people by showing respect as they provide and receive kind, specific, and helpful peer feedback.
  • To provide tech-savvy students with additional challenge, consider allowing them to use more complex tools, such as animation tools, or more complex technological techniques, such as stop-motion.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In the first half of the unit, students planned their PSAs. They wrote PSA scripts and created storyboards. In this lesson, they use technology to create their video PSAs.

Assessment guidance:

  • All assessment materials are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • When assessing and providing feedback on this assessment, use the Presentation Checklist in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • Collect the Writing Addresses homework from Lesson 5. Refer to Writing Addresses (answers, for teacher reference).
  • For ELLs: Collect the Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter homework from Lesson 6. Refer to For ELLs: Homework: Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter (answers, for teacher reference).

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment. ?Some students may require longer than the time allocated to complete the assessment.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students begin to prepare their presentations for the performance task live PSA launch.

In Advance

  • Provide feedback on students' Mid-Unit 3 Assessments in preparation for returning them in Work Time B.
  • Prepare:
    • Technology necessary to play the model PSA (see Technology and Multimedia).
    • Technology tools for students to create their PSA, with at least one device per pair (see Technology and Multimedia).
  • Consider working with a technology teacher to support students as they use technology to create their PSAs.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Opening A: Prepare technology to play the model PSA for the whole group, and if possible for students to access on an internet device in pairs:
  • Work Time A: Prepare the technology tools for students to create their PSAs. One device per pair, preferably with internet access. Options could include, but are not limited to:

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.A.1, 3.I.A.3, 3.I.A.4, 3.I.B.6, 3.I.C.9, 3.I.C.10, 3.I.C.11, 3.I.C.12, 3.II.A.1, 3.II.A.2, 3.II.B.5, 3.II.C.6, 3.II.C.7

Important points in the lesson itself 

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate their content and language knowledge in creating a PSA for their water issue, built on their preparation and practice in Lessons 1-4.
  • ELLs may find the assessment challenging. Encourage students to consult classroom resources and give them specific, positive feedback on the progress they've made learning English.
  • Ensure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves (see additional support in the lesson).

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support students as they generalize skills that they learned from previous lessons in this module to set themselves up for success in their PSAs. 
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students create their water video PSA. Continue to support them in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to provide prompts and sentence frames for those students who require them to be successful in peer interactions and collaboration. Also, support students in sustaining effort and/or attention by restating the goal of the activity.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • high-quality (L)

Materials

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Model PSA (video; play in entirety; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Devices (one per pair; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Criteria for an Effective Video PSA anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Video PSA Planning graphic organizer (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • PSA scripts (completed in Lesson 3; one per student)
  • Storyboard graphic organizer (from Lesson 4; one per student and one to display)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Timer (one per pair)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessments(from Lesson 7; one per student; returned with feedback during Work Time B)
  • Sticky notes (two different colors; one of each per student)
  • Peer Critique anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Directions for Peer Critique(one to display)
  • Writing Addresses (homework from Lesson 5; one per student)
  • Writing Addresses (answers, for teacher reference)
  • For ELLs: Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter (homework from Lesson 6; one per student)
  • For ELLs: Homework: Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter (answers, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

"I can use my plans to create a high-quality video PSA with a partner."

"I can critique my peers' PSA and provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback."

  • Focus students on the first target and remind them that in the first half of the unit, before they wrote their letters, they planned their PSAs. Turn and Talk:

"It says you need to use your plans. What planning documents do you have to help you create your PSAs?" (planning graphic organizer, script, and storyboard)

  • Underline the words high-quality. Think-Pair-Share:

"What does high-quality mean? How might a high-quality video PSA look different from one that isn't high-quality?" (It means it is very effective and looks professional. One that isn't high-quality might be difficult to see or understand; the audio might be difficult to hear, etc.)

  • Focus students on the second learning target and remind them that they have participated in peer critiques many times.
  • For students who may need additional support with motivation: Ask students to give specific examples of how they have worked toward similar learning targets in this unit. (MME)
  • For ELLs: (Assessment Map) While explaining, display a "map" of the assessment.
  • For ELLs (Displaying Planning Documents) Consider displaying each planning document students can use to help them create their PSAs and inviting them to explain how each of the documents may be useful in this process.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 3 Assessment: Water Issue Video PSA (140 minutes) 

  • Invite students to pair up with their PSA partner.
  • Invite students to retrieve their End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt and review it as necessary.
  • Remind students of the corresponding habits identified on the Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart:
    • "I take care of and improve our shared spaces and the environment."
    • "I apply my learning to help our school, the community, and the environment."
  • Play the model PSA.
  • Direct students' attention to the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart. Turn and Talk:

"According to the chart we put together, what is the next step?" (create the PSA)

  • Ensure that pairs each have a device to use.
  • If necessary, provide tutorials on the basic features of the same one or two simple tools students experimented with in the exploration lesson.
  • Tell students how long they will have to create their PSAs. Tell them that there will be a peer critique at the end of the time for them to have a chance to hear what others think and to revise their work.
  • Direct students' attention to the Criteria for an Effective Video PSA anchor chart and cold call students to read aloud each criterion.
  • Invite students to retrieve and review the following with their partners:
    • Video PSA Planning graphic organizer
    • PSA scripts
    • Storyboard graphic organizer
  • After 5 minutes, focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and invite them to read the habits of character on the chart to themselves. Focus them specifically on respect and remind students to be respectful of each other, respectful of their classmates, and respectful of other students/people in the building as they record their video PSAs.
  • Remind students that as they are working in pairs, they will need to decide who is going to read which part of the script, so this is something they should do before they begin recording. Encourage them to play to their strengths--if one of them is a stronger reader than the other, he or she could read more while the other student in the pair could focus more on the technology tools.
  • Distribute timers and remind students of the 1-minute time limit. Circulate to support students in creating their PSAs and stop the whole group to discuss common issues that you notice as you circulate. Provide frequent time reminders.
  • When 2 minutes remain, refocus the group and use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.
  • For students who may need additional support with persistence and sustained effort: Provide verbal and visual examples of how to problem-solve when students encounter a challenge as they create their PSA. Emphasize process and effort by modeling how to ask for help with clear and specific language. (MME)
  • For students who may need additional support in planning: Invite students to create a checklist of the steps they will follow as they create their PSA. Discuss and agree upon appropriate check-in points when students can share their progress and reflect on the process after each step. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Note-catcher for Capabilities and Limitations) Invite students to reference the note-catcher created in Lesson 4 to evaluate the different technology tools (see the Meeting Students' Needs section for Work Time A) to help them determine which tool to use to create their PSAs.
  • For ELLs: (Concrete, Corresponding Examples) Invite students to reference the model PSA to share an example of each criterion on the Effective Video PSA anchor chart. Consider writing each example on the anchor chart next to the criterion, providing students with concrete, corresponding examples to refer to as they create their PSAs. (Example: Criterion = Engaging--viewer wants to watch to the end and will remember it. Concrete example: Ask questions, such as, "Does anyone know how we can use energy the smart way?")

B. Returning Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes) 

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 3 Assessments with feedback and follow the same routine established in Modules 1-3 for students to review the feedback and write their name on the board if they require teacher support.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Peer Critique: PSA (30 minutes) 

  • Invite pairs to partner up with another pair to form a group of four and to label themselves pair A and B.
  • Tell students they will now participate in a peer critique. Refocus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them specifically of the habit of respect. Remind students that when providing peer feedback, they need to be respectful.
  • Briefly review the Criteria for an Effective Video PSA anchor chart again and remind students to be looking for evidence of these criteria in their new partners' work.
  • Distribute sticky notes and use the Peer Critique anchor chart and the Directions for Peer Critique to guide students through a peer critique.
  • When 2 minutes remain, use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the second learning target and how well they demonstrated the habit from the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart that they decided to focus on today.
  • Collect the Writing Addresses homework from Lesson 5. Refer to Writing Addresses (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For ELLs: Collect the Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter from Lesson 6. Refer to the For ELLs: Homework: Language Dive Practice: Model Invitational Letter (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Invite students to take a stretch and movement break halfway through the peer critique. (MME)
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Invite students to repeat the sequential steps for the peer critique in their own words. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For students who may need additional support with far-point display: Provide an individual copy of the Peer Critique anchor chart for reference during this protocol. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: (Sentence Starters) Provide sentence starters on the sticky notes for students to complete during the peer critique. Examples:
    • "One thing you did well was _____."
    • "Have you thought about _____?"
  • For ELLs: (Home Languages) Invite students to share kind, helpful, or specific comments in their home languages. Ask:

"How would you say 'excellent point' in Spanish?" (excelente punto)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from grades 2 or 4, or record an audio response.

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