Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M4:U3:L1

Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • SL.3.2: Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL.3.3: Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
  • SL.3.4: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze a model to generate criteria for an effective video PSA. (SL.3.2, SL.3.3, SL.3.4)
  • I can choose a water issue to be the focus of my video PSA. (SL.3.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Student plan of process on Video PSA Presentation Process note-catcher (SL.3.4)
  • Student choice of water issue on PSA Planning graphic organizer (SL.3.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Watching a Model PSA (25 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria for an Effective PSA (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Planning a PSA: Choosing an Issue (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • During the Opening and Work Time A, students watch a model PSA and generate criteria for an effective PSA. Students plan the process of creating a PSA, first in pairs and then whole group. This is to encourage students to begin considering the steps required to complete a project and to give them a sense of ownership of the process. An outline of the process followed in the unit has been provided to use to guide students (see supporting materials). It is important that the group arrives at the process outlined on the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (example, for teacher reference), since this is the sequence outlined in the lessons. If students suggest additional steps with good rationale, add those steps in and consider how to integrate them into the lessons at the appropriate time.
  • In the Closing, students choose an issue they would like to create a PSA about before pairing up with someone who would like to create the same PSA. Consider assigning the pairs to ensure that they are supported. If there are an odd number of students, they can work in triads or independently. Use your judgment based on the students involved (SL.3.4).
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to contribute to a better world by taking care of and improving the environment and applying their learning to help the environment when planning their PSAs.
  • The research reading students complete for homework helps to build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to water. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Units 1-2, students read texts to build background knowledge about water on Earth and three issues related to freshwater. In this unit, they choose one of those three issues as a topic for their PSA.

Assessment guidance:

  • Review the Video PSA Presentation Process note-catchers to determine whether students have begun to internalize the process required to create high-quality work products.
  • Ensure that all students have selected a water issue and have recorded it on their planning graphic organizer.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need support planning the process. Consider grouping those who may need additional support together for teacher guidance.

Down the road:

  • Over the course of this unit, students will plan and practice their PSAs. In the next lesson, they will choose the key points they wish to include and will plan the structure of their PSAs.
  • At the end of the unit, students will create a video PSA. Consider working with a technology expert to determine the technology available for this, as well as potential opportunities with additional technology work, such as video editing.

In Advance

  • Prepare the technology necessary to play the model PSA. If possible, give students access to the model PSA on devices (see Technology and Multimedia).
  • Review the PSA process to familiarize yourself with the steps students will follow to complete their PSAs (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • Opening A: Prepare technology to play the model PSA for the whole group, and if possible for students to access on an internet device in pairs: Sustainable Energy. "How to Save Energy for School Teaching - 25SDA." YouTube. 19 June 2016. Web.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.B.5, 3.I.B.6, 3.I.B.7, 3.I.B.8, 3.I.C.11, 3.I.C.12, 3.II.A.1, 3.II.A.2

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by explicitly reviewing key vocabulary words; providing the opportunity for students to analyze a model of the work they will complete during the remainder of the unit; and providing multiple viewings of the model PSA, allowing students to absorb and comprehend more information each time.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to determine criteria for an effective video PSA, as this may be the first time they are exposed to one. Consider sharing one or two criteria before inviting students to do so on their own (see "For heavier support" and the Meeting Students' Needs in Work Time A).

Levels of Support

For lighter support:

  • After defining and practicing the word effective in the Opening, invite students to "prove" which part of speech effective falls under by explaining its function in a sentence. Provide a sentence frame for support. (Example: "I know effective is a(n) ______ [adjective] because it _____" [describes a noun: a person, place, thing, or idea].)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, consider modeling and thinking aloud how to determine criteria for an effective video PSA. For example, play the beginning of the model PSA and stop when the issue of energy is introduced, listing "describes the issue" on the Criteria for an Effective Video PSA anchor chart. Model determining additional criteria as necessary, supporting students in understanding the types of criteria to consider.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students analyze a model PSA before determining criteria for their own PSAs to be developed in this unit. Students need strong flexible thinking and metacognitive skills as they develop this knowledge. Provide scaffolds to support diverse abilities in using these skills and guide students in making connections from Units 1-2 to the work ahead in this unit.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support students in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected during this unit.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Remind students of the goal they are working toward in this lesson with their PSA

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • PSA, effective (L)

Materials

  • Performance Task anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt (one per student and one to display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Model PSA (video; play in entirety; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Video PSA Presentation Process note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening A; see supporting materials)
  • Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Parts of Speech anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Criteria for an Effective PSA anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Criteria for an Effective PSA anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Water issues research note-catchers (one per student):
    • Access to Water (from Unit 1, Lesson 7)
    • Demands on Water (from Unit 1, Lesson 9)
    • Water Pollution (from Unit 1, Lesson 11)
  • One Well (from Unit 1, Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Video PSA Planning graphic organizer (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Watching a Model PSA (25 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the Performance Task anchor chart and read it aloud.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What are you going to be doing for this performance task?" (giving a live presentation to launch the video PSA we create)

"So what do you think you will be doing in this unit?" (creating a video PSA and preparing a presentation)

  • Focus students on the three habits of character anchor charts:
    • Working to Become Effective Learners
    • Working to Become Ethical People
    • Working to Contribute to a Better World
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"Which of these habits of character do you think this performance task will help us to practice? Why?" (working to contribute to a better world, because we are creating a product that will help educate others about an environmental issue, which is helping to take care of the environment)

  • Focus students on the Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart and Think-Pair-Share:

"Which specific habits do you think we will be most focused on? Why?" (taking care of and improving the environment and applying our learning to help the environment, because the content of our PSA will work toward both of these)

"Before you begin creating a video PSA, what would it be helpful to do? Why?"(watch a PSA to know what a PSA should include)

  • Distribute and display the End of Unit 3 Assessment prompt and read it aloud.
  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"How does this end of unit assessment connect to the performance task?" (We are creating the PSA, which we will then present to a live audience for the live launch.)

  • Play the model PSA.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What is this PSA about?" (how to save energy)

"What is the purpose of this PSA?" (to show people ways to save energy)

"What do you like about this PSA? What makes you want to watch it?" (Responses will vary, but may include: The drawing style is engaging because the artist is really talented, and it brings what the person is saying to life.)

  • Conversation Cue: "Can you say more about that?" (Responses will vary.)
  • Distribute and display the Video PSA Presentation Process note-catcher and read the directions aloud.
  • Ensure students understand that each row on the organizer is a step in the process, and that they will work with an elbow partner to map out the steps they think they need to take to achieve the performance task.
  • Emphasize that this is a thinking activity, and the graphic organizer is there only to capture their thinking to share with the class. It is not best work. They only need to write notes/sketch pictures on the organizer to help them remember the steps they choose.
  • Remind students to think of the steps they have followed to complete previous performance tasks in previous modules.
  • Circulate to support students in thinking through the process. Refer to the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary as an example of the type of steps students can list on their note-catcher. Prompt students with questions such as:

"Why do you need to do that? Does anything need to happen before that?"

"What will come next?"

  • After 10 minutes, refocus whole group. Cold call students to share steps of the process. Record the process on the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart. Refer to the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) and guide students toward the process outlined on the example anchor using the following questions:

"What would you do first? Why?"

"What next? Why?"

"Is there anything missing between these steps?

  • For ELLs: (Playing Model PSA Twice) Consider playing the model PSA twice, the first time asking students to watch for "gist" and the second time to focus on the questions from the Think-Pair-Share. Consider pausing the PSA the second time it is played as solutions are presented, asking students about the purpose of this PSA.
  • For ELLs: (Linking Words and Phrases: Referencing Handout) Encourage students to use temporal words and phrases from their Linking Words and Phrases handout as they share the steps of the video PSA presentation process (e.g., first, next, then, after that, lastly).
  • For students who may need additional support with planning: Offer pre-written index cards containing possible steps for students to use as they complete the note-catcher. Invite students to arrange the steps in a logical order as a reference for planning their own steps for the PSA. (MMAE)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

"I can analyze a model to generate criteria for an effective video PSA."

"I can choose a water issue to be the focus of my video PSA."

  • Focus students on the first learning target and underline PSA. Turn and Talk:
  • "What is a PSA?" (public service announcement)
  • Underline the word effective. Turn and Talk:

"What word could you use to replace the word effective in this learning target?"(successful)

"When we say effective, what do we mean? If a PSA is effective, what will it do?"(encourage people to do something to help)

"What do you think you will be doing in this lesson? What makes you think that?"(watching a PSA model to generate criteria and choosing a water issue for my PSA)

  • Help students make connections between the process recorded on the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart and the learning targets for this lesson.
  • For ELLs: (Practicing Key Words in a Familiar Context) Invite students to practice using the word effective in a familiar context to solidify understanding of this key word. Provide sentence frames for support. (Example: I am effective at _____ [being a good friend] because _____ [I share with others and listen well]. Explain that effective is an adjective, describing something that is successful. Add effective as an example of an adjective on the Parts of Speech anchor chart (see Unit 1).
  • For students who may need additional support with auditory processing: Display questions visually and record student responses during the discussion to aid with comprehension. (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing a Model and Generating Criteria for an Effective PSA (15 minutes) 

  • Play the model PSA again. As students watch, invite them to consider what makes this an effective PSA.
  • Remind students that to be effective, a PSA needs to encourage people to do something or to change the way they do something to help a cause.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What makes this model an effective PSA? How does it encourage people to do something or to change the way they do something to help a cause?" (Responses will vary, but may include: It shows people that the things they can do to help a cause are easy things. They are not time-consuming or expensive.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses on the Criteria for an Effective PSA anchor chart. Refer to the Criteria for an Effective PSA anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.
  • For ELLs: (Focused Viewing) Consider asking students the questions from the Think-Pair-Share before playing the model PSA again, allowing the questions to guide students' focus for this viewing. Before playing the PSA, invite students to come up with a gesture, such as touching their nose, for when they see or hear something in the PSA that makes it effective. Pause the PSA when students make this gesture and invite them to share what they saw or heard before continuing the PSA. As students share out, capture their responses on the Criteria for an Effective PSA anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: (Linking Words and Phrases) Encourage students to use linking words and phrases as they share examples of what makes the model PSA effective (e.g., for example, for instance, furthermore). Invite students to add any new linking words and phrases to their Linking Words and Phrases anchor chart.
  • For students who may need additional support with planning for verbal expression: Offer scaffolding by listing questions or cues for students as they share ideas for criteria. (Example: ?How would we ensure that viewers know what we want them to do after watching the PSA??) (MMR, MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Planning a PSA: Choosing an Issue (10 minutes) 

  • Remind students of the next step in the process recorded on the Video PSA Presentation Process anchor chart:
    • Choosing an issue
  • List the three issues on the board:
    • Access to water
    • Demands on water
    • Water pollution
  • Invite students to retrieve their water issues research note-catchers and their copies of One Well.
  • Give them 3 minutes toreview the research they collected on each issue and to choose the one they would most like to create a PSA about.
  • After 3 minutes, invite students to move to an allocated area of the room to show which issue they would like to work on.
  • Once in the area for their issue, invite students to pair up with someone. Explain that this student will be their partner for the duration of the unit--together they will create the PSA and present the live launch. Emphasize the habit of responsibility on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and remind students to choose someone they know they will work well with and who will complement their strengths and areas of challenge. For example, someone who is not a strong reader will want to partner up with someone who is a strong reader.
  • Support students in choosing appropriate partnerships and invite them to sit together.
  • Distribute the Video PSA Planning graphic organizer and focus students on the boxes at the top for their name, the name of their partner, and the issue they have chosen.
  • Invite students to record this information on their graphic organizers so they remember in the next lesson.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the second learning target and how well they demonstrated the habit from the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart that they decided to focus on today.
  • For ELLs: (Fishbowl) Invite three confident students to Fishbowl reviewing their note-catchers, thinking aloud why they might consider choosing a certain issue, and walking to the part of the room allocated to that issue. This provides students with a model for determining an issue of focus and minimizes confusion about the activity.
  • For ELLs: (Home Language) Consider encouraging students to find a partner who shares their home language, allowing students to use their home language to plan and create their PSA.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from grades 2 or 4, or record an audio response

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