End of Unit 1 Assessment: Part I: Frog Festival Part I | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M2:U1:L12

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Part I: Frog Festival Part I

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.3.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  • W.3.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • W.3.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • RF.3.3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • RF.3.4: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  • RF.3.4a: Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • RF.3.4b: Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
  • RF.3.4c: Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • L.3.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.3.1a: Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
  • L.3.1g: Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can revise my pourquoi tale to correctly use comparative and superlative adverbs. (W.3.3, W.3.5, W.3.10, L.3.1g)
  • I can read my pourquoi tale aloud accurately and with expression. (RF.3.4a, RF.3.4b, RF.3.4c)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Revised pourquoi tale (W.3.3, W.3.5, W.3.10, L.3.1g)
  • Reading Fluency Self-Assessment Checklist (RF.3.4a, RF.3.4b, RF.3.4c)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Returning Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Comparative and Superlative Adverbs (10 minutes)

B. Revising Pourquoi Tale: Comparative and Superlative Adverbs (10 minutes)

C. End of Unit Assessment, Part I: Frog Festival, Part I (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Frog Festival, Part I: Reflections (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Complete the Comparative and Superlative Adverbs practice in your Homework Resources.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students revise their pourquoi tales with a specific focus on comparative and superlative adverbs (L.3.1g). While student work may or may not feature comparative and superlative adverbs, this is a time to learn and practice the rules associated with the use of these words.
  • In Opening A, students' Mid-Unit 1 Assessments are returned with feedback. The purpose of this is for students to have the opportunity to see how they performed in order to improve in their next assessment, and to ask questions if they don't understand the feedback.
  • Not much time has been given to the revision of pourquoi tales for comparative and superlative adverbs, as it is unlikely that students will have many examples or opportunities for examples in their tales.
  • It is unlikely that all students will be able to read their narratives in this lesson. As a result, time has been allocated for Frog Festival, Part II in Lesson 14. Divide the group accordingly.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is working to become ethical people. The characteristic they are reminded of specifically is respect, as they will be participating in the Frog Festival and will need to be respectful performers and audience members.
  • The research reading students complete for homework helps to build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to frogs and specifically frog adaptations. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.
  • Some students practice their fluency in this lesson by reading their pourquoi tale aloud during the Frog Festival.

How it builds on previous work:

  • This lesson gives students the opportunity to revise and edit their completed pourquoi tales.
  • During the Frog Festival, students perform their story as a read aloud to an audience and practice the reading fluency skills they have been working on.

Areas where students may need additional support:

  • Some students may require additional practice forming and using comparative and superlative adverbs, as this lesson only introduces them briefly.
  • Some students may require support reading their tales aloud during the Frog Festival, either because they require additional support reading the words or because they lack the confidence to perform to an audience.

Assessment guidance:

  • Writing rubrics can be found in the Grade 3 Writing Rubrics document. All other assessment materials (student copy, answer key, student exemplar) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources. 
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist (Grade 3) to informally assess students as they read their stories aloud during Work Time C.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 13, students answer questions about comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs and write a new pourquoi tale for the End of Unit 1 Assessment.
  • In Lesson 14, the Frog Festival continues. 

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with feedback from Lesson 7.
    • Order for students to perform in the Frog Festival.
    • Reading Fluency Checklist for each student. This checklist will be used to assess students' fluency when they read their pourquoi tale aloud during the Frog Festival in Work Time C.
  • Consider inviting other students, teachers, and families to attend the Frog Festival. Plan this accordingly and invite an audience in advance.
  • Consider preparing a room or a space for the Frog Festival (e.g., with seats set up for an audience).
  • Post: Learning targets, Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time C: Record students reading their pourquoi tales aloud using software or apps such as Audacity or GarageBand.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.C.10, 3.II.A.1, 3.II.B.5.

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate their content and language knowledge in a Frog Festival built on their preparation and practice in previous lessons. They self-assess at the end of the lesson in order to celebrate their successes and chart a course for the future.
  • ELLs may find the End of Unit 1 Assessment challenging, as it may be a big leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction. Before they begin, encourage students to do their best and congratulate them on the progress they've made learning English. For students who have trouble with fluency, it may be difficult and stressful to read aloud without support. If they ask for help, tell them they are great readers and they are doing well on their own.
  • Make sure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. For example, the reading fluency assessment requires some self-orchestration on the part of the students. Take some extra time to make sure they know what is expected of them. This way the assessment will go more smoothly with fewer interruptions for process questions. See additional support in the lesson.
  • The comparative and superlative adverbs mini lesson will be beneficial for ELLs, but it will be also more difficult for them, as some may not have as intuitive a grasp of the structure as native speakers. While the handout draws out the patterns in the form, introduce these patterns explicitly earlier in the lesson. Example: "What do you notice about the last two letters when using the comparative adverb quicker? What word comes before the adverb bouncily that makes it comparative?" (-er; more) If time allows, invite students up to the board and compare the way they do actions, like jumping, using comparative and superlative adverbs.
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss what was easiest and what was most difficult, and why. For example, while circulating during the closing, ask students which part of the Frog Festival was most difficult: reading in front of friends, reading with expression, or knowing what the words said.
  • In future lessons and for homework, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation: In order to set themselves up for success for the assessment, students will need to generalize the skills that they learned from the previous sessions. Before administering the assessment, activate their prior knowledge by recalling the learning targets from the previous lessons. Additionally, make sure that you are presenting the directions for the assessment both visually and verbally. Facilitate comprehension by displaying a map of the assessment parts.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Some students may need support in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected. Appropriate goal-setting supports development of executive skills and strategies. Offer scaffolds for students learning to set appropriate personal goals, such as a checklist with three goals or reminders for the assessment.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Some students may require support with limiting distractions during the mid-unit assessment (e.g., using sound-cancelling headphones or dividers between workspaces). Similarly, some students may require variations in time for the assessment. Consider breaking the assessment into two parts and offering breaks at certain times. During the assessment, provide scaffolds that support executive function skills, self-regulation, and students' abilities to monitor progress before and after the assessment (e.g., visual prompts, reminders checklists, rubrics, etc.). 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • adverb, comparative, superlative (L)

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback (one per student; completed in Lesson 7)
  • Parts of Speech anchor chart (begun in Lesson 11)
  • Parts of Speech anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Comparative and Superlative Adverbs (one for display)
  • Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (from Lesson 11; one per student and one to display)
  • Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (from Lesson 11; example, for teacher reference)
  • Pourquoi tale (completed in Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Reading Fluency Self-Assessment Checklist (from Lesson 11; one per student)
  • Reading Fluency Checklist (one per student; see Teaching Notes; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (from Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Returning Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback.
  • Invite students to spend a few minutes reading the feedback. If they require teacher support to understand the feedback, encourage them to write their name on the board so you can visit with them in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with reading: Reassure them that if they don't understand or cannot read the feedback, they will have an opportunity to review it with you during the lesson. (MME)
  • Build an accepting and supportive by reminding students that everyone is working toward individual goals and that learning is about continued growth and development. (MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can revise my pourquoi tale to correctly use comparative and superlative adverbs."

"I can read my pourquoi tale aloud accurately and with expression."

  • Emphasize that the first learning target is similar to one of the learning targets in Lesson 11. Underline the word adverb and remind students that in the previous lesson, the emphasis was on adjectives.
  • Explain that today students will help each other revise their pourquoi tales for the use of comparative and superlative adverbs. 
  • For students who may need additional support understanding the terms in the learning targets: Write synonyms or descriptions above key terms. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Ask: "What does accurately mean?" (correctly; to read exactly what is on the page) "What does it mean to read with expression?" (to read with feeling; to change your voice depending on what is happening in the story)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Comparative and Superlative Adverbs (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on the word adverb in the first learning target.
  • Focus students on the Parts of Speech anchor chart, specifically on the 'Adverbs' row.
  • Invite a volunteer to read aloud the descriptor in the "What is it?" column:
    • "a word that that describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb."
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is an adverb?" (a word that that describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb)

"What are some adverbs to describe how a frog hops?" (slowly, quickly, bouncily, energetically)

  • Add to the "Example" column of the Parts of Speech anchor chart. See the Parts of Speech anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Underline the word comparative. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"From what you learned in the previous lesson about comparative adjectives, what do you think a comparative adverb might be?" (a word that compares how the action of a verb happens)

"So if you were comparing how slowly one frog hopped compared to another, what comparative adverbs might you use?" (more slowly, more quickly)

  • Display Visual #1 on Comparative and Superlative Adverbs.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"So if you were using the adverb slowly to describe the speed the frog with the arrow is hopping compared to the speed of the other, what comparative adverb might you use? The frog with the arrow is hopping ______." (more slowly)

  • Display and invite students to retrieve their Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout.
  • Record the comparative adverb in the second column, inviting students to do the same on their copy. Refer to the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"What is the verb in that sentence?" (hopping)

  • Add to the "Example" column of the Parts of Speech anchor chart. See the Parts of Speech anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"What other verbs might you use to describe a frog's actions?" (jumping, eating, drinking, bouncing)

  • Add to the "Example" column of the Parts of Speech anchor chart. See the Parts of Speech anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Display Visual #2 on Comparative and Superlative Adverbs. Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"So if you were using the adverb fast to describe the speed the frog with the arrow is hopping compared to the other, what comparative adverb might you use? The frog with the arrow is hopping ______." (faster)

  • Record the comparative adverb in the second column of the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy. Refer to the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).
  • Underline the word superlative.
  • Remind students that superlative means of the highest quality or degree and when discussing superlative adverbs, it is used to compare the action of one thing to a group of other things.
  • Display Visual #3 on Comparative and Superlative Adverbs. Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"So if you were using the adverb slowly to describe the speed the frog with the arrow hops compared to the speed the other two frogs hop, what superlative adverb might you use? The frog with the arrow hops _____." (most slowly)

  • Record the superlative adverb in the third column of the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy. See Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).
  • Display Visual #4 on Comparative and Superlative Adjectives. Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"So if you were using the adverb fast to describe the speed the frog with the arrow hops compared to the other two frogs, what superlative adverb might you use? The frog hops the ______." (fastest)

  • Record the superlative adverb in the third column of the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy. Refer to the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and to help you complete the comparative and superlative adverbs for the other two examples on the handout.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"What do you notice about how these words change as they become comparative adverbs?" Refer to the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).

  • Complete the What Do You Notice? box on the handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner and then invite responses from the group, using a total participation technique:

"What do you notice about how these words change as they become superlative adverbs?" Refer to the Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs handout (example, for teacher reference).

  • Complete the What Do You Notice? box on the handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy.
  • For students with auditory processing needs: Consider posting discussion questions or giving them to these students before the discussion. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Remind students that describe means to tell details about something so we have more information about how it looks, sounds, smells, feels, or tastes. With adverbs, we describe how a person or thing does an action.
  • For ELLs: Ask: "Do you notice a word that almost always comes after comparative adverbs in a sentence?" (than) Confirm that than comes after a comparative adverb when comparing it to something else specific. Write an example: "The poison dart frog moves more quickly than a snail." Ask: "Do you notice a word that almost always comes before a superlative adverb in a sentence?" (the) Confirm that the comes before a superlative adverb. Write an example: "The frog with the arrow hops the most slowly."
  • For ELLs: Have students practice using comparative and superlative adverbs with an elbow partner using sentence frames to prompt speech. Example: "I think the __(type of frog)__ jumps the highest of all the frogs." "I think the wood frog hops more _______ than the water-holding frog." (quickly, energetically, bouncily)

B. Revising Pourquoi Tale: Comparative and Superlative Adverbs (10 minutes)

  • Pair students up.
  • Explain that students will now work together to review their pourquoi tale and consider appropriate use of comparative and superlative adverbs.
  • Post the following directions:

1. Number yourselves 1 and 2.

2. #1 read your pourquoi tale aloud.

3. Review the comparative and superlative adverbs used in the narrative.

    • Are they used accurately?
    • Could any others be added to make the story more precise and interesting?

4. Repeat for #2.

  • Circulate to support pairs as they review and revise their work. Remind students not to revise for the sake of it; it is important that the revisions make the story more precise and/or interesting.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support using resources to support their writing: Foster independence in preparation for the end of unit assessment by ensuring that students are using available resources effectively as they write. Example: When circulating the room, ask a student which charts they use when they are trying to think of a vocabulary word to use. (MMAE)

C. End of Unit Assessment, Part I: Frog Festival, Part 1 (25 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Remind them that they reviewed the criteria on this anchor chart in the previous lesson.
  • Invite students to retrieve their Reading Fluency Self-Assessment Checklist and to remind themselves of the criteria they highlighted in the previous lesson to work on.
  • Tell students they are now going to begin the Frog Festival. Explain that some students will perform today, and some will perform in Lesson 14.
  • Remind students of the importance of being a good audience member. Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart, specifically respect. Remind students that as they will be watching their peers as they take a risk and read in front of the class, and will need to treat each other with care as they participate in the Frog Festival.
  • Invite the first student to begin. Assess each student's performance using the Reading Fluency Checklist.
  • Repeat with as many students as you have time for in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with planning: Ensure that students know the process for participating in the Frog Festival to minimize any confusion. Consider having a small group model the expected process and behavior. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Strategically group students so there is at least one advanced or native language proficient student in each group.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Frog Festival, Part I: Reflections (5 minutes)

  • Invite those students who read their pourquoi tales aloud to self-assess their performance with their Reading Fluency Self-Assessment Checklist, using a different colored pen or pencil than they used in the previous lesson.
  • While performers are reflecting, invite audience members to pair up and share two highlights: one thing they learned and one thing they would like to consider for their own performance in the upcoming lesson.
  • Use a checking for understanding protocol (for example Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against how well they showed respect in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who may need support with self-reflection: Provide a sentence frame for audience members to reflect and model using it. Example: "I learned that _______. For my turn, I want to remember to _______." (MMAE)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Complete the Comparative and Superlative Adverbs practice in your Homework Resources.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support completing the Comparative and Superlative Adverbs practice: Consider meeting with students to complete one question together before they complete the rest independently.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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