End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M1:U1:L11

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • RL.3.2: Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.
  • RL.3.3: Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • RL.3.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
  • RL.3.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • L.3.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can read closely to answer questions about a text. (RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.10, L.3.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text (RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.10, L.3.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Returning Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text (45 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students read a new narrative text and answer selected response questions and write short constructed responses to answer questions about the text for the end of unit assessment (RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, L.3.4)
  • In Opening A, students' Mid-Unit 1 Assessments are returned with feedback. The purpose of this is for students to have the opportunity to see how they performed in order to improve in their next assessment, and to ask questions if they don't understand the feedback.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to overcoming challenges in access to education, books, and reading near and far. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • Throughout this unit, students have been reading literary texts to identify the central message or lesson and how it is conveyed in the text and also how the main character overcomes a challenge. They have also practiced writing short constructed responses to answer questions about texts. This lesson assesses their ability to do these things independently.

Areas where students may need additional support:

  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 50 minutes allotted. Consider providing time over multiple days if necessary.

Assessment guidance:

  • All assessment materials (student text and questions and teacher answer key) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.

Down the road:

  • In the next unit, the focus zooms in from access to education to access to books. Students move from reading literary texts to reading informational texts to identify the challenges some children in different locations around the world have accessing books and how they are able to overcome those challenges.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with feedback from Lesson 7.
    • End of Unit 1 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Post: Learning target, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart, and Writing Short Constructed Responses anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students complete assessments online, by completing a Google Form, for example.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.B.6, 3.I.B.7, 3.I.C.10, 3.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed previously in the unit. Students have worked with the Reading for Gist and Recounting the Text note-catcher and the Overcoming Learning Challenges anchor chart to read and analyze an unfamiliar text, practiced selected response questions repeatedly, and responded to prompts using short constructed responses.
  • ELLs may find the End of Unit 1 Assessment challenging, as it may be a big leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction for some. Before students begin, encourage them to do their best and congratulate them on the progress they've made learning English. Point out some specific examples.
  • Ensure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. See additional support in the lesson.
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss what was easiest and what was most difficult on the assessment, and why. To facilitate this discussion, prepare a concise rubric of the elements of the assessment and allow students to rank the difficulty level of these elements on a Likert scale. Example:

The selected response questions were easy to answer. 1 2 3 4 5

  • In future lessons and for homework, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation: To get the most informative data from the assessment, ensure that all students have access to the assessment directions and feel comfortable with the expectations. Vary the ways in which you convey your expectations. Examples: reading the directions and questions aloud, engaging in a clarifying discussion about the directions, or creating a map of the assessment to preview its tasks.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression: Since this is an assessment, there are limited opportunities to modify the product. However, consider providing flexibility in how students complete it. Allow students to use tools that will support their fine motor skills (e.g., pencil grip, slanted desk, or word processor).
  • Multiple Means of Engagement: Assessments can be overwhelming to some students. Supply students with tools to support self-monitoring during the assessment (e.g., checklists or visual timers for each portion of the assessment). Also, provide tools that minimize distractions during the assessment (e.g., sound-canceling headphones or dividers). Some students may need support with building their independent writing stamina. Consider offering predetermined breaks during which students can choose from a list of appropriate activities, such as getting a drink of water or stretching. Over time, students will build stamina and the breaks should become less frequent.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • Do not preview vocabulary for this assessment lesson.

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback (one per student; completed in Lesson 7)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text (one per student; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Spelling, Capitalization, and Punctuation handout (from Lesson 10; one per student and one to display)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (from Lesson 3)
  • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Writing Short Constructed Responses anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Returning Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with Feedback.
  • Invite students to spend a few minutes reading the feedback. If they require teacher support to understand the feedback, encourage them to write their names on the board so you can visit with them in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with reading: Reassure them that if they don't understand or cannot read the feedback, they will have an opportunity to review it with you during the lesson. (MME)
  • Build an accepting and supportive by reminding students that everyone is working toward individual goals and that learning is about continued growth and development. (MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning target and select a volunteer to read it aloud:

 "I can read closely to answer questions about a text."

  • Remind students that they have practiced the skills required by this learning target multiple times over the course of this unit. In this assessment, they will apply these skills to a new literary text.
  • Answer any clarifying questions.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with memory: Invite students to recall and describe one way that they worked toward the learning target during this unit. (MMR)
  • Allow students to reference their constructed responses from previous lessons to guide discussion if appropriate. (MMR)
  • Build an accepting and supportive environment by reminding students that everyone is working toward individual goals and that learning is about continued growth and development. (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text (45 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Answering Questions about a Literary Text and invite students to take out their Spelling, Capitalization, and Punctuation handout.
  • Tell students that for this assessment, they will read a new literary text, answer selected response questions, and write short constructed responses to answer questions about it.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads, while you read the directions for each part of the assessment aloud. Answer clarifying questions.
  • Direct students' attention to the following anchor charts:

- Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart

- Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart

- Writing Short Constructed Responses anchor chart

  • Remind students to refer to these anchor charts and handout as they read the assessment text and answer the assessment questions.
  • Remind students that since this is an assessment, they should complete it independently in silence.
  • Invite students to begin the assessment.
  • While they are taking the assessment, circulate to monitor their test-taking skills. This is an opportunity to analyze students' behaviors while taking an assessment. Document strategies that they use during the assessment. For example, look for those who are returning to the text as they answer the questions.
  • Remind students who finish quickly to check their spelling, capitalization, and punctuation using the appropriate anchor chart.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Read the assessment directions, questions, and possible answers aloud. Ensure that students are clear about all directions. Rephrase the directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop those who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with executive function skills: As you explain, display a "map" of the assessment on the board. Provide timers to increase predictability for the assessment process. (MME, MMAE).

Example:

Four parts:

1. Read a text

A. Read a new text about an elephant library.

B. As you read, fill out the Somebody/In/Wanted/But/So note-catcher.

2. Answer questions about word meaning

A. Select the best response for #1, 2, 4, and 5.

B. Write your own response for #3.

3. Constructed response

A. Complete the Lesson/Message/Moral note-catcher about the elephant library story.

B. Read the question about the elephant library.

C. Write a short constructed response.

4. Constructed response

A. Complete the Overcoming Learning Challenges note-catcher about the elephant library story.

B. Read the question about the elephant library.

C. Write a short constructed response.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

"Which specific strategies from these anchor charts did you use to complete your assessment? How did they help you answer the questions?" (Responses will vary, but may include: thinking about the answer before looking at the selected response options and looking back to the text to answer questions.)

"What is one strategy you are going to make sure you use in your next reading assessment?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students that this is the first reading assessment of many, so they will have plenty of opportunities to improve.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with expressive language: Model and think aloud the process of using the anchor charts to explain the strategies you used and will use again. (MMR)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Discuss and respond to your prompt orally, either with a partner, family member, or student from grades 2 or 4, or record an audio response. Read the prompts aloud and brainstorm possible responses with your teacher. If you have trouble writing sentences, write words or make sketches in your responses, or your teacher can give you sentence starters. (MMAE)
  • Refer to the Assessment Overview and Resources for supporting materials for this lesson.

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