Reading and Writing: Group Research: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 14–15 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M3:U1:L5

Reading and Writing: Group Research: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 14–15

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.1.2: Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.1.3: Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • RI.1.5: Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • RI.1.7: Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • RI.1.9: Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.1f: Use frequently occurring adjectives.
  • L.1.5d: Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can read and discuss information about bird beaks using the texts Just Ducks and Birds (Scholastic Discover More). (RI.1.2, RI.1.3, RI.1.5, RI.1.7, RI.1.9, SL.1.1, SL.1.2)
  • I can create and label an observational drawing of a mallard duck. (W.1.8, L.1.1f)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Continue to gather data on students' progress toward L.1.5d as you observe them distinguish shades of meaning among adjectives.
  • Continue to use the Reading Informational Text Checklist during the reading aloud to research bird beaks in Work Time A to track students' progress toward RI.1.2, RI.1.3, RI.1.5, RI.1.7, and RI.1.9 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During the Closing, circulate and observe students as they complete the Birds Research notebook. Watch for students to draw and label what they observe and accurately use descriptive adjectives to describe birds to gather data on their progress toward W.1.8 and L.1.1f.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "Bird Walk" Poem (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Engaging the Researcher: Just Ducks, Pages 10-11 (5 minutes)

B. Reading Aloud to Research Bird Beaks: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 14-15 (20 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Birds Research Notebook (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Working to Become Ethical People: Empathy (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Works Times A, B, and C as well as the Closing contain repeated routines from Lessons 3-4. Refer to those lessons for more detail, as necessary.
  • In this lesson, students continue to build knowledge about how to use various text features to gain information about the physical characteristics of birds.
  • Beginning in this lesson, the Mini Language Dive format in the Meeting Students' Needs column shifts to reflect the new Language Dive Guide format for Modules 3 and 4 (see Language Dives in the Tools page). Although students should briefly discuss all chunks in the Mini Language Dive sentence, the new format invites them to slow down during one chunk to focus on a compelling language structure. For more context, consider reviewing the full Language Dive Guide in Lessons 7, 9, and 11 of this unit, as well as a range of possible questions students might ask one another in Questions We Can Ask During a Language Dive in the Tools page.
  • In this lesson and throughout Modules 3 and 4, ELL supports and the Mini Language Dives within the Meeting Students' Needs column will continue to be labeled and condensed. For more information, see the Teaching Notes in Lesson 3.
  • As students write in their Birds Research notebook, they write a sentence using descriptive adjectives to describe the bird they are observing in the photograph (L.1.1f, i). Students also label the beak on their drawing and add a caption next to the beak. These tasks are meant to reinforce students' growing knowledge of text features in informational text.
  • During the Closing, students give kind, specific, and helpful feedback to the teacher. During the next several lessons, students will practice showing empathy when engaging in the feedback process. For this lesson, the teacher demonstrates receiving feedback so that students can practice showing empathy by asking how the teacher feels. Consider preparing a student ahead of the lesson to share his or her work also, in order to have students show empathy and give feedback.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • As in Lessons 2-4, students continue to work with the "Bird Walk" poem and adjectives.
  • As in Lessons 3-4, students revisit the What Researchers Do anchor chart as they "gather evidence from texts" during the reading aloud to research session. In Work Time C, students continue to explore the different ways that researchers gather evidence from texts. Today students practice how to "Read captions."
  • During previous lessons, students practiced creating an observational drawing of a bird with labels. In this lesson, they continue to refine these skills, and add a descriptive sentence to their drawing.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need additional support to transition to writing more independently. Remind them to use the tools around the room such as the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart, the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart, and the High-Frequency Word Wall.
  • During Work Time C, some students may need additional support with writing a complete sentence when describing the bird. Consider reviewing how to use the words from the question as a cue to formulate the answer with a complete sentence. Example: "What does the beak look like?" (The beak looks _______.)
  • The concept of empathy may feel abstract; students may find it difficult to reflect on how to show empathy. As students begin sharing their work, continue to name specific behaviors that show empathy and give concrete examples that help students articulate their own progress toward this habit of character. Example: "I notice Juan told me he was feeling nervous about sharing. I want to make sure that I make him feel comfortable when he is sharing and be a good listener. This will hopefully make him feel more comfortable."

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 6, students will practice answering questions through shared writing. Students will be asked to use text features in the text Birds (Scholastic Discover More) along with their growing knowledge of birds to answer several text-dependent questions. This activity is meant to scaffold students for the Unit 1 Assessment, which will measure their progress toward RI.1.2, RI.1.3, RI.1.5, and RI.1.7.

In Advance

  • Prepare the mallard duck photograph in color, if possible.
  • Preview page 4 of the Birds Research notebook to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Pre-distribute Materials for Work Time C at student workspaces.
  • Post: Learning targets, "Bird Walk" poem, and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson Materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1 and 2 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.B.6, 1.II.A.1, 1.II.A.2, 1.I.C.10, 1.I.A.1, 1.I.A.3, 1.II.B.4, and 1.I.B.8

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through opportunities to learn language through poetry and movement and to practice writing in complete sentences.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to add a sentence and a caption to their observational drawing (see "Levels of support" and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Consider inviting ELLs to be the dad and the kid during the Opening and give them the cards with four new adjectives added to the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart in Lesson 4 written on them (i.e., stunning, gigantic, tiny, intense). Have them label each group of birds using the new adjectives.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, as students draw and label their observations, provide index cards with illustrated key words to students who have trouble writing. They can use these index cards as guides for writing labels.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students engage with two texts and then use this information to create an observational drawing. Continue to provide scaffolds to students to support diverse abilities in using these strategies, such as manipulatives to guide students in new understandings.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students continue to research birds and translate their learning into writing. Continue to support students in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As students engage with the texts during this lesson, continue to support them in linking the information presented back to the learning target to emphasize and remind them of the instructional goal.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • Captions (L)
  • dabbling, nibble, brilliant (T)

Review:

  • label, physical characteristics, empathy, kind, specific, and helpful feedback (L)

Materials

  • "Bird Walk" (Lesson 2, one to display)
  • Just Ducks (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Birds (Scholastic Discover More) (one to display for teacher read-aloud, and one per pair)
  • What Researchers Do anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • What Researchers Do anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4; added to during Work Time B)
  • Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Mallard duck photograph (one to display)
  • Birds Research notebook (from Lesson 2; page 4; one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Birds Research notebook (from Lesson 2; answers, for teacher reference)
  • Empathy anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to during the Closing; see supporting Materials)
  • Empathy anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "Bird Walk" Poem (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Display "Bird Walk."
  • Read the poem once together as a class.
  • Tell students they are going to act out the poem together.
  • Invite them to stand, and break them into four groups.
  • Share that each group will be a group of birds from the poem:
    • Pretty/gorgeous group
    • Big/humongous wings
    • Little/minuscule beaks
    • Bright/brilliant feathers
  • As they read the poem together, they will pretend to be the group of birds when that part of the poem is read. While they wait their turn, they may walk in place.
  • Remind groups that when they act out the adjectives from the poem, they should pay attention and listen to the strength of the adjective in the stanza. For example: "When you are humongous, make yourselves REALLY big!"
  • Assign each group and invite students to move so they form one big circle. Choose two students to pretend to be the kid and the dad.
  • Read the poem aloud together. Invite the kid and dad to walk to each group of birds as the poem is read.
  • As time permits, switch up the groups and continue reading the poem aloud.
  • For ELLs: (Reading Chorally) Consider inviting an ELL to point to the adjectives in the poem and lead the class through the echo reading.
  • As the poem is read aloud together, minimize the threat for students who may not feel confident in their reading skills and may benefit from modeling. Provide differentiated mentors who may be more confident reading aloud near students who may not feel as confident. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Researcher: Just Ducks, Pages 10-11 (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Tell students they will now read two pages from Just Ducks, paying careful attention to the illustrations and to the words the author uses to describe the beak of a mallard duck.
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time A of Lesson 4 to read pages 10-11 of Just Ducks, paying careful attention to the illustrations and words used to describe the beak.
    • While pointing to the illustration of the duck at the bottom of page 10, ask:

"What is the duck doing with its beak?" (biting the water)

    • Reread the sentence "I look down and see them swimming around, dabbling at the surface ..." and ask:

"What is the duck doing with its beak when it is dabbling?" (nibbling at the surface of the water to get tiny bits of food)

    • If productive, cue students to add on to what a classmate said:

"Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think."

"Where, in the text, can you find what the word dabbling means?" (smaller text under the picture of the duck)

    • Read aloud the fact box on the bottom of the page, and ask:

"What does the word nibble mean?" (to eat in small bites)

    • Invite students to act out the word dabbling with one hand acting as the beak and the other hand acting as the surface of the water.
  • Tell students that they will now continue to research about types of bird beaks.
  • For ELLs: (Defining Words) Consider discussing the meaning of the words dabbling, swimming, and upending. Bring students' attention to the -ing ending in these verbs and point out that it means the ducks are doing these actions at the particular time the girl is watching.
  • For students who may need additional support with oral processing: Offer an alternative for oral information by providing discussion questions visually on the board or chart paper. (MMR)

B. Reading Aloud to Research Bird Beaks: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 14-15 (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students and give them specific, positive feedback on their research from Just Ducks about how the mallard duck uses its beak.
  • Invite students to move to sit with their book buddy from Lesson 3.
  • Distribute copies of Birds (Scholastic Discover More) to pairs.
  • Tell students that now they will continue to compare their research from Just Ducks to their research from Birds (Scholastic Discover More), comparing the beaks of mallard ducks to the beaks of other types of birds.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can read and find information about bird beaks using the texts Just Ducks and Birds (Scholastic Discover More)."

  • Display pages 14-15 of Birds and read the heading at the top of the page 14. Invite pairs to follow along in their book.
  • Point to the word brilliant.
  • Invite a volunteer to remind the class of what the word brilliant means in the poem "Bird Walk". Explain that words can sometimes have two meanings and the reader has to use clues in the sentence or the picture to help them figure out which meaning is the one to use.
  • Tell students that brilliant can also mean smart.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What do you think these two pages are about?" (the different types of bird beaks)

"Why is the heading titled 'Brilliant beaks'?" (because each of the beaks is different and used smartly)

  • If productive, cue students to explain why a classmate came up with a particular response:

"Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response?"

  • Display pages 14-15 and read them aloud, making sure to point to and read each caption and label.
  • Tell students that these pages use labels and captions as text features to help the reader read and understand these pages about bird beaks.
  • Briefly review the definition of label (attached to and gives information about a picture) and define the word caption (explains what a photograph or illustration is about).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are the photographs showing us, and what do they have to do with the heading on page 14?" (These birds all have beaks that do a specific job.)

"Why do you think the author included these birds in this section?" (They all have different types of beaks that do a job.)

"What parts of the bird are labeled, and what are the labels telling us?" (The label is pointing to the beak and includes the name of the bird and a description of what its beak does.)

  • Point to the caption under the beak on page 14 and read it aloud:
    • "A long beak helps the toucan save energy. It can reach fruit in trees without moving!"
  • Ask:

"What information does the caption teach us about the toucan's beak?" (It helps the toucan save energy because it's long and can reach the fruit.)

"How could you describe the shape of the toucan's beak in the photograph?" (curved, pointy, long, yellow)

  • Direct students' attention to What Researchers Do anchor chart and read aloud the new row. Refer to What Researchers Do anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary:
    • "Read captions"
  • Ask:

"How did we use the captions to help us learn about the different beaks of birds?" (The captions tell us what the different types of beaks do.)

  • Tell students that researchers gather evidence from the text by reading captions.
  • Tell students that they are now going to compare their research about the beaks in Just Ducks to their research about beaks in Birds (Scholastic Discover More).
  • First display page 10 in Just Ducks and then display pages 14-15 in Birds (Scholastic Discover More).
  • Turn and Talk:

"Looking at page 10 of Just Ducks, how does the mallard duck use its beak to eat?" (It dabbles at the surface of the water for food.)

"Looking at page 15 of Birds, how do some of the birds use their beaks to help them eat?" (Responses will vary, but may include: The puffin uses its beak to grip fish. The pelican traps fish with its big beak. The brambling cracks seeds with its beak.)

"Why are beaks important to birds? (They help birds do things such as eat.)

  • If productive, cue students to add on to what a classmate said:

"Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think."

  • Direct students' attention to the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart.
  • Briefly review the definition of physical characteristics (something you can see and describe) and reread the information added to the chart in the previous lesson.
  • Tell students that today they will continue to add to this chart based on their research about bird beaks.
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time B of Lesson 4 to guide students through considering their research question and adding their learning to the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart:
    • Think-Pair-Share:

"What are the physical characteristics of birds?"

    • Circulate and listen in and select a few students to share out.
    • Summarize student thinking and add this information to the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart. Refer to Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • Reread the information added to the anchor chart.
  • Tell students that now they will continue to observe and draw a different bird in their Birds Research notebook.
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. "A bird's beak / is perfectly shaped / to eat / its favorite foods!"
    • Deconstruct: Invite students to discuss the meaning of the sentence and grapple with the meaning of each chunk. Encourage extended conversation and practice with the focus structure in the highlighted chunk, keeping the following language goals in mind:

perfectly shaped: "What?"/ Meaning: perfectly shaped is describing the beaks of birds. Suggested questions: "What does perfectly mean in this sentence?" (in a perfect way, extremely well) "What do you think it means that a bird's beak is perfectly shaped? What, in the sentence, makes you think so?" "What is another way to say this chunk?" (The shape of a bird's beak helps it eat; the shape of a bird's beak is perfect for it to eat.) (adverb/past participle verb)

  • Practice: The shape of its beak helps a bird __________.
    • Reconstruct: Reread the sentence. Ask:

"Now what do you think the sentence means?"

"How does your understanding of this sentence add to your understanding of bird's beak?"

    • Practice: Consider inviting students to use the sentence to speak or write about other information in the text. Suggestion: "A _____'s beak is perfectly shaped to _____." (puffin/grip fish; macaw/crack nuts)
  • For ELLs: (Multiple Meaning Words) Consider pointing out that the word brilliant in this text has a different meaning from the word brilliant in the poem "Bird Walk." Reread the word in both texts and ask:

"What is the meaning of the word brilliant in the poem 'Bird Walk'?" (shiny)

"What is the meaning of the word brilliant in the text Birds?" (smart)

  • For students who may need additional support with verbal expression: Provide sentence frames during the discussion. (MMAE)

C. Independent Writing: Birds Research Notebook (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Remind them that in previous lessons, they drew several different observational bird drawings.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can create and label an observational drawing of a mallard duck."

  • Tell students that today they will observe a photograph of a mallard duck, create a new drawing, label the beak, and write a sentence and a caption about the beak in their notebook.
  • Display the mallard duck photograph.
  • Display page 4 of the Birds Research notebook and follow the routine from Work Time C of Lesson 3 to guide students through observing and creating an observational drawing of a mallard duck. Refer to Birds Research notebook (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary. Note: Today, students add a sentence and a caption to their observational drawing:
    • Direct students' attention to the question under the bird name and read it aloud:

"What does the beak look like?"

    • Model filling in the answer. (Example: The beak is yellow and short).
    • Invite students to use descriptive adjectives to describe the beak and a complete sentence to answer the question on the two lines provided.
    • Tell students that they should also add a caption to their drawing that describes a fact about the mallard duck's beak.
    • Model adding a caption. (Example: The bird dabbles with its beak.)
    • Invite students to add a caption under the bird name.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Drawing) Display the mallard duck photograph and point to the shapes and body parts while thinking aloud to model how to complete the observational drawing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Prompting Adding More to Their Writing) While circulating, support students in writing complete sentences by prompting them to reflect on their work.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organization for written expression: (Verbal Writing Practice) Allow students to discuss and rehearse their sentences before writing.
  • For ELLs: (Using Sentence Frames) Invite students to use language drawn from the Language Dive practice from Lessons 3. (The beak is _______ and _______.)
  • For students who may need additional support with self-regulation: When giving students a warning before the transition, continue to provide a clear routine for what to do with unfinished work and use a timer. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Working to Become Ethical People: Empathy (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind them that showing empathy means trying to understand how someone is feeling.
  • Direct students' attention to the Empathy anchor chart.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What are two ways we can try to understand how someone is feeling?" (body language; thinking about the situation)

  • Tell students that another way to understand how someone is feeling is by asking them. This is easy to do when we are sharing our work and our feedback.
  • Invite students to repeat after you:

"How are you feeling about sharing today?"

  • Write "How are you feeling about ___ today?" on the Empathy anchor chart. Refer to Empathy anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Thumb-O-Meter) for students to respond to the following:

"How do you feel about sharing your work with a partner?"

"How do you feel about sharing you work in front of the whole class?"

"How do you feel about getting feedback about your work?"

  • Tell students that giving and receiving feedback is a situation that we will use to practice showing empathy.
  • Briefly review kind, specific, and helpful feedback (feedback that tells the writer one thing he or she did a good job of in the writing, but it is still kind)
  • Tell students you'd like to share your drawing for the day.
  • Invite the class to ask you, "How are you feeling about sharing today?" (Answer with any emotion.)
  • If time permits, ask for volunteers to give you some kind, specific, and helpful feedback.
  • For ELLs: (Using Anchor Charts: Setting Goals) Note students responses to any of the questions. Find an opportunity to discuss with them why they responded that way. Use information gathered from this conversation to set goals, using the Empathy anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: (Sharing Work) Some students may feel less anxious if they know what sharing their work will actually look like. Consider modeling what to do (hold work up so others can see it, speak in a loud voice, point to parts of the work you are talking about) and what to say about the work (name the bird, describe the different body parts, read the caption and the sentence, and share what was hard to do).
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Invite them to recall one way they recently showed empathy outside the classroom. (MMR)

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