Reading and Writing: Group Research: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 6–7 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M3:U1:L4

Reading and Writing: Group Research: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 6–7

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.1.2: Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.1.3: Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • RI.1.5: Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • RI.1.7: Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • RI.1.9: Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.1f: Use frequently occurring adjectives.
  • L.1.5d: Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can read and discuss information about bird colors using the texts Just Ducks and Birds (Scholastic Discover More). (RI.1.2, RI.1.3, RI.1.5, RI.1.7, RI.1.9, SL.1.1, Sl.1.2)
  • I can create and label an observational drawing of a great spotted woodpecker.  (W.1.8)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Continue to gather data on students' progress toward L.1.5d as you observe them distinguish shades of meaning among adjectives.
  • Continue to use the Reading Informational Text Checklist during the reading aloud to research in Work Time A to track students' progress toward RI.1.2, RI.1.3, RI.1.5, RI.1.7, and RI.1.9 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Continue to gather data on students' progress toward W.1.8 as you observe them draw and label what they observe about the great spotted woodpecker.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "Bird Walk" Poem (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Engaging the Researcher: Just Ducks, Pages 14-15 (5 minutes)

B. Reading Aloud to Research Bird Colors: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 6-7 (20 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Birds Research Notebook (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Working to Become Ethical People: Empathy (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Opening A, Work Times A and B, and the Closing all contain repeated routines from Lesson 3. Refer to that lesson for more detail, as necessary.
  • This lesson connects to Next Generation Science Standard 1-LS3-1. During Work Time A, students continue to focus on the following disciplinary core idea: Individuals of the same kind of plant or animal are recognizable as similar but can also vary in many ways. In previous lessons, students began to learn about how all birds are similar; in Lessons 4-6, students begin to learn about how birds vary.
  • In this lesson, students begin to build knowledge about the physical characteristics of birds. As in Lesson 3, students read an excerpt from Birds (Scholastic Discover More) to gain information about birds. In this reading aloud to research session, students continue to learn how to use various text features to gain information from the text efficiently.
  • Lessons 1-3 featured built-out instruction for Goal 4 Conversation Cues. Moving forward, this will appear only as reminders after select questions. Continue using Goal 1-4 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. Refer to the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.
  • Students continue to focus on the habit of character of empathy. Continue to use the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart to unpack this habit of character.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This lesson follows a similar structure to Lesson 3: Students listen to an excerpt from Just Ducks, participate in a reading aloud to research session, and create an observational drawing with labels about a specific bird.
  • As in Lesson 3, students revisit the What Researchers Do anchor chart as they "gather evidence from texts" during the reading aloud to research session. In Work Time C, students continue to explore the different ways that researchers gather evidence from texts. Today students practice how to "Study pictures, photographs, illustrations."

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During Work Time C, students complete a sketch of a new bird. Some students may be challenged by the concept of a sketch and will want to provide greater detail in their drawing than time allows. For those students, consider presenting the activity as a playful challenge--"Can you sketch a bird in 2 minutes?"--or inviting them to create their sketch by using only shapes for the body and head.
  • As in Lesson 3, some students may need additional support with creating their observational drawing and adding labels to their drawings. Consider having pre-labeled copies of a model observational drawing for students to reference as they complete their drawing.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 5, students will share their observational drawing with a partner. Students will review giving kind, specific, and helpful feedback to each other. They will also think about how to show empathy when providing feedback.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Adjective word cards (see supporting Materials).
    • Great spotted woodpecker photograph--in color, if possible.
  • Preview page 3 of the Birds Research notebook to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Pre-distribute Materials for Work Time C at student workspaces.
  • Post: Learning targets, "Bird Walk" poem, and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson Materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1 and 2 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.B.6, 1.II.A.1, 1.II.A.2, 1.I.C.10, 1.I.A.1, 1.I.A.3, 1.II.B.4, and 1.I.B.8

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through opportunities to learn language through poetry and movement and to build their research skills around informational text.
  • ELLs may find the work with shades of meaning challenging, particularly if they do not know the meaning of the words being presented (see "Levels of support" and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Ask students to share what they noticed the teacher did and thought while modeling drawing the bird.
  • Ask students what they notice about the big and small print in the text Just Ducks.

For heavier support:

  • To support understanding of shades of meaning, copy each word in the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart onto a card, shuffle the cards, and invite students to sort them into groups according to their similar meaning. Consider labeling each group (e.g., Words that mean something looks nice, Words that mean something is of a big size, Words that describe the color of something).

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students engage with two texts and then use this information to create an observational drawing. Recall that this transfer of information into knowledge requires metacognitive skills and strategies. Some students may need support in connecting and remembering the information presented. Continue to provide scaffolds to students to support diverse abilities in using these strategies.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Continue to support a range of fine motor abilities and writing needs by offering students options for writing utensils.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As students engage with the texts during this lesson, continue to support them in linking the information presented back to the learning target to emphasize and remind them of the instructional goal.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • heading, physical characteristics, label (L)

Review:

  • text feature, observational drawing, empathy (L)

Materials

  • "Bird Walk" (from Lesson 2, one to display)
  • Adjective word cards (one of each to display)
  • Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to during the Opening; see supporting Materials)
  • Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Just Ducks (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Birds (Scholastic Discover More) (from Lesson 3; one to display for teacher read-aloud, and one per pair)
  • Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time B; see supporting Materials)
  • Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • What Researchers Do anchor chart (from Lesson 1; added to in advance; see supporting Materials)
  • What Researchers Do anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Great spotted woodpecker photograph (one to display)
  • Bird Experiences anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1; added to during Work Time C)
  • Birds Research notebook (from Lesson 2; page 3; one per student)
  • Birds Research notebook (from Lesson 2; answers, for teacher reference)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 2)
  • Empathy anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to during the Closing; see supporting Materials)
  • Empathy anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "Bird Walk" Poem (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Display "Bird Walk" and the Adjective word cards.
  • Tell students that you found some new adjectives that might be able to go on the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart.
  • Read the word cards aloud and invite students to repeat them after you.
  • Ask volunteers to offer ideas about where to write each word on the chart, including which column they belong in. Encourage volunteers to explain their thinking (e.g., "Stunning goes with gorgeous because it is a big word that means something looks nice").
  • As students share out, capture their ideas on the Adjective Shades of Meaning anchor chart. Refer to Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Read the poem aloud together.
  • If time permits, read the poem again and replace the second adjective in each stanza with the new adjective added to the anchor chart.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with Vocabulary: (Defining Words) Make sure students understand the meaning of the words added to the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: (Rereading) Invite students to reread the poem and clap their hands as they read the adjectives in the poem. Invite them to clap their hands loudly or softly depending on the strength of the adjective.
  • Support oral language and processing by allowing ample wait time as students explain their thinking. (MMAE, MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Researcher: Just Ducks, Pages 14-15 (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Display Just Ducks.
  • Tell students that today they will read two pages from Just Ducks, paying careful attention to the illustrations and to the words the author uses to describe the colors of mallard ducks.
  • While displaying the text, reread pages 14-15 aloud.
  • Point to the illustration on page 14 and ask:

"What is the name for a girl mallard duck?" (duck)

"What colors are the girl mallard ducks?' (streaky browns and tans)

  • Point to the illustration on page 15 and ask:

"What is the name for the boy mallard duck?" (drake)

"What colors are the boy mallard ducks?" (glossy green heads, white collars, brown body)

  • If productive, cue students to explain why a classmate came up with a particular response:

"Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response?"

  • Turn and Talk:

"Why are the girl mallard duck's colors different from those of the boy mallard duck?" (The girl's colors help her hide from danger to protect her eggs. The boy does not sit on eggs.)

"How do you know this from the text?" (The smaller fact boxes told us.)

  • Circulate as students talk and target a few students to share out with the whole group.
  • Tell students that they will now look at another book about birds to examine the colors and appearance of different types of birds.
  • For ELLs: (Correcting Errors) As students interact, jot down and share with the class samples of effective communication and one or two common language errors (pervasive, stigmatizing, critical).
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organizing their thinking for verbal expression: (Providing Think Time) Before inviting students to turn and talk, consider giving time to think and process the questions. (MMAE, MME)

B. Reading Aloud to Research Bird Colors: Birds (Scholastic Discover More), Pages 6-7 (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students and give them specific, positive feedback on their research about the different colors of mallard ducks.
  • Invite students to move to sit with their book buddy from Lesson 3.
  • Distribute copies of Birds (Scholastic Discover More) to pairs.
  • Tell students that now they will compare their research from Just Ducks to their research from Birds (Scholastic Discover More), comparing the colors of mallard ducks to the colors of other types of birds.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can read and discuss information about bird colors using the texts Just Ducks and Birds (Scholastic Discover More)."

  • While displaying pages 6-7 in Birds (Scholastic Discover More), point to the heading on the top of page 6 and review the definition of heading (a group of words at the top of a page of writing that tells you what the section is about).
  • While they work with their book buddy, tell students to put their finger on the heading as you read it aloud:
    • "Cool colors"
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What do you think these two pages are about?" (the different colors of birds)

  • Tell students that they are going to continue to research about different bird colors by listening to several pages in Birds (Scholastic Discover More).
  • Tell students that as they listen, they should think about the research question:
    • "What are the physical characteristics of birds?"
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is a physical characteristic?" (something you can see and describe)

  • If productive, cue students to agree or disagree and explain why:

"Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why? I'll give you time to think."

  • Direct students' attention to the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart. Tell students that today they will begin to read and find information about bird colors to add to this chart.
  • Display pages 6-7 and read the text on page 6. Invite pairs to follow along in their book.
  • Point to each bird on pages 6-7, while reading the corresponding labels.
  • Tell students that these pages use labels as a text feature.
  • Define label as something attached to an object or picture that gives more information about that object or picture.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are the photographs and labels showing us?" (the different birds and their names)

"How do we know which label goes with which photograph?" (The arrow is pointing to a picture.)

"Why did the author include all the birds in this section? (because all of these birds are different colors)

"Which photograph and label is the same as the bird found in the text Just Ducks?" (the mallard duck)

"What do you notice that is different about the images in both books?" (The pictures in Just Ducks are painted, and the pictures in Birds are real photographs.)

  • Direct students' attention to What Researchers Do anchor chart and read the sixth row aloud. Refer to What Researchers Do anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • "Study pictures, photographs, illustrations"
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How did we use the photographs to help us research the different colors of birds?" (All of the photographs showed us different colors of birds.)

  • Explain that researchers gather evidence from texts by studying pictures, photographs, and illustrations.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What are the physical characteristics of birds?"

  • Circulate and listen in and select a few students to share out.
  • Summarize student thinking and add this information to the Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart. Refer to Physical Characteristics of Birds anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Reread the information added to the anchor chart and tell students that they will add new information to this chart as they continue to research additional physical characteristics of birds.
  • Tell students that they will continue to research the physical characteristics of birds as they observe and draw a different bird in their Birds Research notebook.
  • For ELLs: (Using Shades of Meaning) Challenge students to describe the birds on pages 6-7 of Birds using adjectives and shades of meaning learned in previous lessons. Invite them to use the Adjectives Shades of Meaning anchor chart.
  • Continue to provide white boards and dry-erase markers as an option for students to record (in drawing or writing) their ideas. This helps scaffold active listening for key details. (MMR, MMAE)

C. Independent Writing: Birds Research Notebook (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students and give them specific, positive feedback on their research about the different colors of birds.
  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they drew their first observational bird drawing.
  • Tell them that today they will observe a photograph of a great spotted woodpecker, create a new drawing, and label it with the words feet, beak, and feathers.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can create and label an observational drawing of a great spotted woodpecker."

  • Briefly review the definition of observational drawing (a drawing of what you notice or see).
  • Display the great spotted woodpecker photograph.
  • Invite students to share the sounds a woodpecker makes.
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time A of Lesson 1 to ask students what they think about woodpeckers and if anyone in their family has had experiences with them and to capture their thinking on the Bird Experiences anchor chart.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What shapes do you see in the photograph?" (circles, ovals, triangles)

"What body parts do you see on the bird?" (beak, feet, wings)

"What do we need to add to our observational drawing?" (labels)

  • Tell students that now they will get a chance to observe and create an observational drawing of the great spotted woodpecker.
  • Display page 3 of the Birds Research notebook and follow the same routine from Work Time C of Lesson 3 to guide students through observing and creating an observational drawing of a great spotted woodpecker:
    • Think aloud to model how to complete an observational drawing of the great spotted woodpecker.
    • Read aloud the directions at the top of page 3.
    • Use the feathered friends routine from Lesson 3 to transition students back to their workspaces in the following order: blue feathers, green feathers, red feathers.
    • Invite students to begin drawing and labeling.
    • Circulate to support students and encourage them to use classroom resources when drawing and labeling. Refer to Birds Research notebook (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • After 10-12 minutes, signal students to stop working and collect notebooks.
  • Inform students that they will add an observational drawing of a new bird in the next lesson, and they will also add a sentence to describe the bird they are drawing.
  • For ELLs: (Using Charts) Consider asking students to refer to the What Researchers Do anchor chart to tell what they are doing in this work session (record observations using pictures and words).
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Drawing) Display the great spotted woodpecker photograph and point to the shapes and body parts while thinking aloud to model how to complete the observational drawing. (MMAE, MME)
  • For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Continue to vary methods for responses by offering options for drawing utensils and writing tools. (MMAE, MME).

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Working to Become Ethical People: Empathy (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart.
  • Invite students to help you read aloud the definition of empathy:
    • "This means I try to understand how people feel."
  • Direct students' attention to the Empathy anchor chart.
  • Cold call on one or two students to remind the class of one way to understand someone's feelings (body language).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How do you think the students felt when I cold called them to answer?" (scared, nervous, excited)

  • If productive, cue students to agree or disagree and explain why:

"Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why? I'll give you time to think."

  • Tell students that another way we can understand someone's feelings is by thinking about the situation. If we have been in the situation before, we may know how it feels.
  • Using the Empathy anchor chart, ask students to provide some situations that may cause each emotion. As students share out, capture their responses in the third column on the chart. Refer to Empathy anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For ELLs: (Defining Words) Clarify the meaning of the word situation as an event that affects someone.
  • For ELLs: (Adding Visuals) As you add students' responses to the "Situation" column on the Empathy anchor chart, help clarify Vocabulary by including photos or illustrations to represent different situations.
  • For ELLs: (Sharing Orally) Some students might have strong feelings about sharing their work orally or speaking in front of the class. Help students express their ideas and ensure their ideas are added to the Situations column of the Empathy anchor chart.

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