Performance Task: Create Prompt Cards | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M3:U3:L14

Performance Task: Create Prompt Cards

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • W.8.4, W.8.5, W.8.10

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • SL.8.1, SL.8.5, SL.8.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can draft a reflection on the planning of my graphic panels. (W.8.4)
  • I can identify key points from my reflection to create prompt cards for my presentation. (W.8.10)
  • I can revise and strengthen my prompt cards using peer feedback. (W.8.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket
  • Work Time A: Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer
  • Work Time B: Performance Task prompt cards (W.8.4, W.8.10)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - SL.8.5 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Draft a Reflection - W.8.4 (15 minutes)

B. Draft Key Points for a Presentation - W.8.10 (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Peer Review and Feedback - W.8.5 (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.8.4 – Work Time A: Students draft a reflection on their graphic panels, taking into consideration the task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.8.10 – Work Time B: Students draft the key points in their reflection and create prompt cards.
  • W.8.5 – Closing and Assessment A: Students provide feedback to partners on their presentations, and they revise their prompt cards accordingly.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Provide students with specific presentation skills to focus on during their first presentations to a partner in Closing and Assessment A—for example, saying each word clearly and carefully.
  • Students can watch presentations on topics that interest them to observe how presenters use body language, tone of voice, pacing, and visual aids to share information and engage an audience.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the previous lesson, students created graphic panels that illustrated a moment in their narrative interviews. In this lesson, students will write a reflection on their graphic panels and create prompt cards for their performance task presentation.

Support All Students

  • Providing written and verbal directions and charting the steps they will take to create their prompt cards and present to a peer can help students understand what to do. ▲
  • Group students in home language groups for the Closing and Assessment A, in which students share their thinking, ideas, and presentations. This will help students to provide more precise feedback and support. ▲
  • Note there is a differentiated version of Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer used in Work Time A in the separate Teacher’s Guide for English Language Learners. ▲

Assessment Guidance

  • Review student work during and after the lesson to provide specific feedback and suggestions. Ensure that students are meeting the criteria on the Performance Task anchor chart.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will present their graphic panels in a gallery walk presentation for their performance task.

In Advance

  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 14.
  • Consider how to engage and sustain effort and persistence throughout the lesson, as students will not be formally assessed on their performance task. Remind students of the many real-world applications of effective presentation skills and technical literacy. Focus students on the joy of learning for learning's sake.
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 14 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.A.1, 8.I.A.3, 8.I.C.9, and 8.II.A.1.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson includes guided tasks that help them plan for their performance task presentations. Students will analyze a Model Performance Task Reflection before writing their own reflection on the process they used to select a moment from their narrative to explode and how they created their graphic panel. Then, students will draft their reflection and plan out key points for their presentation. In Closing and Assessment A of the lesson, students will support each other in refining their presentations through a peer feedback exchange.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to articulate the process they used to plan and create their graphic panel. Students may find it helpful to discuss this process in home language groups before capturing their process in writing. Likewise, ELLs may find it difficult to plot out key talking points for their presentations. Remind students to avoid writing out their presentations, and build in ample time for students to talk through what they want to say about their graphic panels before they move to outlining their points on prompt cards.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Performance Task anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3 Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time B)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • N/A
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 14 (one per student)
  • Model Performance Task Reflection (one per student and one for display)
  • Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer (one per student)
  • Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer ▲
  • Model Performance Task prompt cards (one per student and one for display)
  • Index cards (three per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - SL.8.5 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 14.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Draft a Reflection – W.8.4 (15 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can draft a reflection on the planning of my graphic panels.”

  • Display the Performance Task anchor chart. Ask a volunteer to read the criteria aloud to review.
  • Turn and Talk:

“What is the purpose of the reflection for the performance task?” (To explain to the audience how we planned our graphic panels.)

  • Display and distribute the Model Performance Task Reflection.
  • Read aloud the questions and answers in each column of the model. Explain to students that they will write a reflection on their graphic panels and the information they want to convey about Holocaust upstanders to their audience.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

“What are the three main focuses of the reflection of the graphic panels?” (Explode the moment, planning process, new information the audience can learn.)

  • Distribute the Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer. For ELLs and students who require additional support, the Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer ▲ can be used to help guide students’ thinking with sentence starters.
  • Tell students that they will answer the questions in each column in the graphic organizer to reflect on their graphic panels. Then they will combine each section to write their reflection in paragraph form. The final paragraph will accompany their graphic panel during their presentation.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • To help students prepare for the performance task, guide students through a review of presentation skills. Invite students to generate a list of presentation skills, and call on student volunteers to briefly demonstrate each one while sharing a portion of their presentation. After seeing a classmate model these presentation skills, students can practice in pairs or small groups, one skill at a time.

For Heavier Support

  • Invite students who need heavier support to use Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer ▲. This resource has sentence frames to help guide students’ thinking.
  • To help students prepare for the performance task, guide students through a review of presentation skills. Call on student volunteers to model delivering a portion of their presentations while focusing on one skill at a time from the following list:
    • Eye-contact with audience
    • Appropriate pacing (not too fast, not too slow)
    • Placing stress (increased volume and intonation) on key words and information
    • Natural, relaxed hand gestures
  • After seeing a classmate model these presentation skills, students can practice in pairs or small groups, one skill at a time. ELLs may benefit from practicing each of these while sharing information in their home languages first before practicing with their performance task presentation.

B. Draft Key Points for a Presentation - W.8.10 (10 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can identify key points from my reflection to create prompt cards for my presentation."

  • Turn and Talk:

"What is the purpose of this presentation?" (Answers will vary, but may include the following: to provide the audience with information about Holocaust upstanders, the narrative interview, the graphic panels.)

"How might it change the lives of our audience members? How might it contribute to a better world?" (Answers will vary, but may include the following: teaching new information about the Holocaust, encouraging audience to have compassion for one another.)

  • Remind students they are going to present the key points of their reflection in a gallery walk for their performance task. Remind students that these cards prompt the speaker to know what to say and how to answer audience questions in the presentation.
  • Display and distribute Model Performance Task prompt cards. Tell students that these are the prompt cards used to discuss their reflection and prepare for answers to potential questions from the audience.
  • Read aloud each prompt card.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What do you notice about these prompt cards? What information has the presenter included?" (Answers will vary.)

  • Emphasize the importance of presenters being able to engage with their audience. If necessary, show students videos of people presenting to audiences.
  • Distribute index cards.
  • Invite students to use the Model Performance Task prompt cards to create prompt cards for their own presentations. Remind students to use bullet points like the model to refrain from writing a script. Students should be able to present to their audience without reading directly from the prompt cards.
  • Circulate as students work, and ensure students are using relevant information from their essay and their prompt cards.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • To help students prepare for the performance task, guide students through a review of presentation skills. Invite students to generate a list of presentation skills, and call on student volunteers to briefly demonstrate each one while sharing a portion of their presentation. After seeing a classmate model these presentation skills, students can practice in pairs or small groups, one skill at a time.

For Heavier Support

  • Invite students who need heavier support to use Performance Task Reflection graphic organizer ▲. This resource has sentence frames to help guide students’ thinking.
  • To help students prepare for the performance task, guide students through a review of presentation skills. Call on student volunteers to model delivering a portion of their presentations while focusing on one skill at a time from the following list:
    • Eye-contact with audience
    • Appropriate pacing (not too fast, not too slow)
    • Placing stress (increased volume and intonation) on key words and information
    • Natural, relaxed hand gestures
  • After seeing a classmate model these presentation skills, students can practice in pairs or small groups, one skill at a time. ELLs may benefit from practicing each of these while sharing information in their home languages first before practicing with their performance task presentation.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Peer Review and Feedback - W.8.5 (15 minutes)

  • Refocus the class.
  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can revise and strengthen my prompt cards using peer feedback."

  • Tell students that they will now have an opportunity to use their prompt cards to have a first attempt at practicing their presentations with a partner. Explain that this process will help them identify additional information they might need to add to their prompt cards in order to support them in presenting effectively.
  • Organize students into pairs, student A and student B. Guide them through the following process using a whole group timer to move them to the next step at the same time:
    1. Student A presents for 3 minutes.
    2. Student B provides feedback, and student A makes revisions for 3 minutes.
    3. Student B presents for 3 minutes.
    4. Student A provides feedback, and student B makes revisions for 3 minutes.
  • Circulate to support students as they revise their work. Remind students that they may thoughtfully reject some suggestions from their peers if they have other ideas on how to meet the criteria and consider how best to implement other suggestions.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

Homework

Homework

A. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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