Reading and Writing: Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Comparing and Contrasting Characters from Oliver’s Tree | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M4:U1:L8

Reading and Writing: Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Comparing and Contrasting Characters from Oliver’s Tree

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2: With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • RL.K.9: With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.
  • W.K.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of the characters in the text Oliver's Tree. (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, RL.K.9)
  • I can describe the parts of a tree and the different ways people can enjoy them. (W.K.8, SL.K.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Collect students' Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree and use the Reading Literature Checklist to document progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, and RL.K.9 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Shared Reading: Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (10 minutes)

2. Work Time 

A. Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Comparing and Contrasting Characters from Oliver's Tree (20 minutes)

B. Engaging the Artist: Revising Pencil Sketches (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Pinky Partners Protocol: Sharing Pencil Sketches (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • In Work Time A, students complete Part I of the Unit 1 Assessment to demonstrate their ability to compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of the characters in Oliver's Tree through writing and drawing (RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, RL.K.9). 
  • During Work Time B, students add a level of detail to the pencil sketches and sketching routine from Lessons 6-7 by outlining a pencil sketch in black ink or marker.

How this lesson builds on previous work: 

  • In Lessons 6-7, students participated in a focused read-aloud to gather information about the characters' experiences and adventures in Oliver's Tree. In this lesson, they use the details about these characters to compare and contrast them.
  • In Lessons 6-7, students practiced closely observing and sketching a part of a tree. In this lesson, they continue with this routine and add a layer of detail to their sketches by outlining them in black ink or marker.

Areas in which students may need additional support: 

  • Continue to consider providing alternative writing tools to students who need support with fine motor tasks during writing and sketching time.

Down the road: 

  • In Lesson 9, students will complete Part II of the Unit 1 Assessment, in which they participate in a small group conversation to share ideas and ask questions about how the characters from Oliver's Tree are similar and different (SL.K.2).
  • In Lesson 9, the teacher administers Part II of the Unit 1 Assessment using a small group rotation system. During Work Time A of Lesson 9, one small group, with the support of the teacher, participates in a small group conversation while two other small groups complete independent tasks. During Work Times B and C of Lesson 9, the small groups rotate through the remaining tasks, so that each student completes every activity. 

In Advance

  • Preview the Unit 1 Assessment to familiarize yourself with what is expected of students. Consider reviewing Lesson 9 in detail to familiarize yourself with the structure and setup of Part II of the Unit 1 Assessment.
  • Prepare:
    • Clipboards with blank copies of the Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree.
    • Materials to model sketching and outlining in Work Time B: tree parts image; model of pencil sketch 3; paper, pencil, and black marker.
      Student workspaces with materials for sketching in Work Time B: tree parts images, pencils, paper, and black markers.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.6, and K.II.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate and reflect upon their learning as well as show leadership through refining their sketches. 
  • ELLs may find it challenging to fully express their ideas in writing when comparing and contrasting the experiences of characters from Oliver's Tree. Encourage students to use resources in the classroom and try to imagine the story in their minds before they begin (see levels of support and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • If they have difficulty starting, encourage students to draw their ideas first and then use those drawings to write.

For heavier support:

  • Before students begin the assessment, offer them the opportunity to verbally share some similarities and differences with a partner. Consider posting and practicing a few sentence frames they can use to share key details from the text. (Examples: "I think Lulu is different than Charlie because ________." "I think Oliver and Lulu are similar because ________.") Remind students that to compare and contrast means to find what is the same and what is different.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Make anchor charts created throughout the module accessible (e.g., large font, unobscured view) as students complete the unit assessment. As the assessment is introduced, highlight these charts and remind students of how they can be used to support their thinking.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students compare and contrast characters from Oliver's Tree during the unit assessment. Continue to support students in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students who may need additional support with drawing may feel uncomfortable sharing with peers and receiving feedback. Continue to promote an inclusive and supportive classroom environment by emphasizing growth rather than relative performance.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

Review:

  • compare, contrast, sketch (L)

Materials

  • Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (begun in Lesson 6)
  • Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree (one per student and one to display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Pencils (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Clipboards (one per student)
  • Trees Are Important Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree (answers, for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Model of pencil sketch 3 (one to display)
  • Tree parts images (from Lesson 6; one set per workgroup and one for teacher modeling)
  • Marker (felt tip, black; one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Paper (blank; several pieces per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 3)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Reading: Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group and give them specific, positive feedback on the work they have done reading several texts to learn about the characters, setting, and major events. 
  • Tell students today is an exciting day because they will get to use their knowledge about the characters, setting, and major events in Oliver's Tree to write and draw about what is the same and different between the characters.
  • Tell students that before they can write and draw about the characters, they need to review the information they collected about each character as they read the text Oliver's Tree.
  • Remind students that they collected a lot of important key details about the characters, setting, and major events in Oliver's Tree on the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree and read it aloud.
  • Invite students to mimic the actions of the characters as you read the information in each column of the anchor chart (e.g., moving arms up and down as if climbing a tree, putting hands above eyes as if searching for the best tree to play in, etc.).
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is something that Oliver and Lulu and Charlie did that is the same?" (They all used their imaginations to play with trees.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

"What is something that Oliver and Lulu and Charlie did that was different?" (Lulu and Charlie could climb trees, but Oliver could not find a tree to climb in.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs: (Partner Share-out) Consider inviting students to turn and talk to share one similarity and one difference. Then, invite a few students to share what their partner said. 
  • For students who may need additional support with oral language and processing: Allow ample wait time during the discussion. (MMAE, MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unit 1 Assessment, Part I: Comparing and Contrasting Characters from Oliver's Tree (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of the characters in the text Oliver's Tree."

  • Review: 
    • compare (to identify, name, or describe similarities, or what is the same, between two or more things) 
    • contrast (to identify, name, or describe the differences between two or more things)
    • Tell students that, in just a minute, they will use information that they gathered about the characters from Oliver's Tree to compare and contrast Oliver with Lulu and Charlie through writing and drawing. 
    • Display the Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree and read the directions aloud.
    • Tell students that now they are going to write and draw about one way that Oliver and Lulu and Charlie are the same and one way that they are different.
    • Point out that this is the same note-catcher they used in Lesson 5 for A Tree for Emmy. The first page is labeled "Same." In the boxes is where they will write and draw what is the same between Oliver and Lulu and Charlie.
    • Distribute pencils and prepared clipboards.
    • Invite students to begin writing and drawing. 
    • Circulate to support students as they work. Refer them to the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree and Trees Are Important Word Wall as needed. 
    • Remind students that their responses should include pictures, labels, and words.
    • After about 7 minutes of work time, refocus students whole group.
    • Direct students' attention to the second page of the displayed Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree.
    • Point out that this is the same note-catcher they used in Lesson 5 for A Tree for Emmy. This page is labeled "Different." In the boxes is where they will write and draw what is different about Oliver and Lulu and Charlie.
    • Invite students to begin writing and drawing. 
    • Circulate to support students as they work. Continue to refer them to the Character Comparison Anchor Chart: Oliver's Tree and the Trees Are Important Word Wall as needed.
    • After about 7 minutes of work time, refocus students whole group.
    • Offer specific, positive feedback on their hard work comparing and contrasting the characters from Oliver's Tree.
    • Tell them that in the next lesson they will participate in a small group conversation in which they use the ideas from their note-catcher to share about how the characters from Oliver's Tree are the same and how they are different.
    • Collect students' note-catchers and use the Unit 1 Assessment: Same and Different Note-catcher: Oliver's Tree (answers, for teacher reference) to evaluate their responses and progress toward RL.K.1, RL.K.2, RL.K.3, and RL.K.9.
    • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Assessment: Prompt and Check for Understanding) Consider repeating the prompt multiple times and checking for understanding by asking students to put the prompt in their own words. (MMR)
    • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Minimize distractions during the assessment by providing tools such as sound-canceling headphones or individual dividers. (MME)

    B. Engaging the Artist: Revising Pencil Sketches (25 minutes)

    • Refocus students whole group and offer specific, positive feedback about how they carefully thought about the characters in Oliver's Tree. 
    • With enthusiasm, tell students they have another opportunity to use sketching to create art that shows the different parts of trees that people can and should appreciate!
    • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

    "I can describe the parts of a tree and the different ways people can enjoy them."

    • Remind students that a sketch is a quick pencil drawing that artists do to show what an object looks like. Artists can later turn their sketches into beautiful pieces of finished art with a little more time and work. 
    • Tell them that today they will have a chance to turn a pencil sketch into a beautiful piece by adding another level of detail to it.
    • Display the model of pencil sketch 3.
    • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

    "What do you notice about this model of a pencil sketch?" (It is not just in pencil, there is black marker; it is really detailed, etc.)

    "What is different about this model of a pencil sketch than the ones we have seen in previous lessons?" (This one is outlined in black. This one is not in pencil.)

    Conversation Cue: "Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

    • Tell students that they are going to outline a pencil sketch today in black marker to make it into a beautiful piece of art. 
    • Follow the routine from Work Time B of Lesson 6 to select a tree parts image and complete a quick pencil sketch.
    • Model how to use a black marker to carefully and slowly trace over the pencil lines of your pencil sketch.
    • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

    "When I was tracing over my pencil sketch with the black marker, what did you notice I did?" (Responses will vary, but may include: You worked slowly and carefully; you didn't scribble with the black marker; you made sure to only trace the pencil lines with the black marker.)

    Conversation Cue: "Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think." (Responses will vary.)

    • Emphasize that when tracing over a pencil sketch with black marker, it is important to work slowly and carefully because, unlike pencil, the black marker cannot be erased!
    • Remind students that they are practicing creating pencil sketches and outlining in black marker now so they can get better and better at this art form, as they will create beautiful art pieces using sketching and outlining skills in later units.
    • Invite students to transition to their workspaces like a leaf floating in the wind.
    • Point out the materials already there: pencils, paper, tree parts images, and markers. 
    • Invite students to:
      • choose a new tree parts image 
      • sketch it in pencil 
      • outline it in black marker
    • Circulate to support students as they work and to prompt them using questions such as: 

    "What part of the tree did you choose? How could someone enjoy that part of the tree?" (Responses will vary.)

    "What types of lines and shapes do you notice in your tree parts image?" (Responses will vary, but may include: straight lines, circles, squares, etc.)

    "What do you notice about how the black marker changed your sketch?" (Responses will vary, but may include: I can see it better; I can see the details better; it looks clearer and neater.)

    • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Invite students to take a quick finger-stretch break once or twice throughout the Work Time. (MME)

    Closing & Assessments

    ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

    A. Pinky Partners Protocol: Sharing Pencil Sketches (5 minutes)

    • Refocus students and give them specific, positive feedback on their careful work observing, sketching, and outlining in black marker.
    • Tell students they are going to use the Pinky Partners protocol to share their sketches with a partner. Remind them that they used this protocol in Module 3 and review as necessary using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
    • Guide students through the protocol.
    • After 3 minutes, refocus students whole group.
    • With excitement, tell them that in the next lesson, they will have a chance to practice their sketching skills again. Remind them that they will also share their ideas about how the characters from Oliver's Tree are the same and different during a small group conversation.
    • For ELLs: (Leadership and Positive Feedback) After the protocol, invite a few students who excel in art (but who might struggle in other areas) to share their work in front of the class. Invite students to notice what about the work is well-crafted. 
    • For students who may need additional support in organizing ideas for verbal expression: Consider providing index cards of previously taught sentence frames or key feedback phrases as support for communication. (MMR, MMAE, MME)

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