Reading Informational Texts: Explaining Factors for Success | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G5:M3:U1:L7

Reading Informational Texts: Explaining Factors for Success

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RI.5.3: Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • RF.5.3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • SL.5.2: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can summarize an informational text read aloud. (SL.5.2)
  • I can gather evidence that supports how people or events led to Jackie Robinson's success. (RI.5.1, RI.5.3)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher (SL.5.2)
  • Participation in additions to factors of success anchor charts (RI.5.1, RI.5.3)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud and Summarizing: Promises to Keep, Pages 28-29 (20 minutes)

B. Rereading to Gather Evidence: Factors for Success (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Research Reading Share (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students listen to and summarize a new chapter from Promises to Keep. They then work in small groups to reread what they have read thus far in Promises to Keep and gather evidence of Jackie Robinson's success (RI.5.1, RI.5.3, SL.5.2). This chapter includes aggressive role-playing by Branch Rickey toward Jackie Robinson, as he plays out potential scenarios Jackie will face on the field. Continue to be mindful that these issues may be sensitive for students, and monitor student reflections to determine if more discussion is necessary.
  • In the Closing of this lesson, students are guided through a research reading share to hold them accountable for their research reading homework. Consider using Independent Reading: Sample Plan (see the Tools page) if you do not have your own independent reading review routines (RL/RI.5.10, SL.5.1).
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to become ethical people by showing respect as they reflect on the chapter read from Promises to Keep, showing integrity as they share their independent reading books, and a characteristic of their choice in working to become an effective learner as they work with their group to reread and gather evidence.

How it builds on previous work:

  • This lesson follows the same routine of listening to and summarizing a chapter from Promises to Keep as in Lesson 6.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need support in rereading and gathering additional evidence of factors of Jackie's success. Consider flagging specific pages in Promises to Keep for groups to reread.

Assessment guidance:

  • Review students' Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher to ensure students understand how to summarize a text read aloud to them.
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist during students' partner discussions in Work Time B (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist to gather phonics and word analysis data during students' research reading share in Closing and Assessment A (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist to gather baseline reading fluency data from students' independent reading books in Closing and Assessment A (see the Tools page).
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist (Grade 5) to gather baseline phonics and word recognition data during students' independent reading share in Closing and Assessment A (see the Tools page).

Down the road:

  • Students will continue gathering evidence on the factors for success anchor charts throughout the second half of this unit. Students will use this evidence to write short informational paragraphs.
  • Students will repeat the routine of listening to an excerpt from Promises to Keep read aloud and summarizing what they have heard as part of the end of unit assessment in Lesson 12.

In Advance

  • Pre-determine groups for Work Time B. Students should be divided into three groups, with each group focused on a different factor for Jackie Robinson's success discussed thus far in the unit: Historical Context, Personal Qualities, and Support from Decision Makers.
  • Prepare a research reading share using with the Independent Reading: Sample Plan document (see the Tools page), or using your own independent reading routine.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1 and 2 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.5 and 5.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by following the same routines for listening to and summarizing a text from Lesson 6, and revisiting the factors for success that students have identified in previous lessons. The consistency of the note-catchers and anchor charts during each work time is also supportive of ELLs.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to take running notes independently during Work Time A, because it is a big leap from the teacher guided note-taking in Lesson 6. Students may also feel overwhelmed by the volume of text they are asked to read in Work Time B to gather examples and evidence for a factor for success (see "Levels of support" and Meeting Students' Needs).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Challenge students to vary the linking words and phrases they use to connect their sentences as they write their summaries. (Example: If they have often used Additionally to connect ideas, encourage them to use Furthermore.)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, distribute a partially filled-in copy of the Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher. This provides models for the kind of information they should enter, while relieving the volume of writing required.
  • During Work Time A, consider providing the summary outline from Lesson 3 to help students organize their writing and make connections between the information on their note-catchers and the information they need to include in their summaries.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): This lesson offers a variety of visual anchors to cue students' thinking. For those who may need additional support, consider creating additional or individual anchor charts for reference. Additionally, chart student responses during whole class discussions to aid in comprehension. Some students may require additional scaffolding in visual representation, such as the use of graphic organizers, charts, highlights, or different colors. This prompts them to visually categorize information into more manageable chunks and reinforce relationships among multiple pieces of information.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to supports students in setting appropriate goals for their effort and the level of difficulty expected.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Invite students to reflect on their learning from the previous lesson with Promises to Keep. This helps students understand the value and relevance of the activities in this lesson. Provide support for students who may need additional guidance in peer interactions and collaboration.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • running notes (L)
  • athletic, ability, serious, values, temper, character, self-control, opportunity, pressure, nonviolent (T)
  • chose, character, spiteful, react, realized, handle (W)

Materials

  • Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher (example, for teacher reference)
  • Promises to Keep (from Lesson 1; one per student and one to display)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Module 1; added to during Work Time A)
  • Domain-Specific Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during Work Time A)
  • Criteria for an Effective Summary anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Factor for Success: Historical Context anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4; added to during Work Time B; see supporting Materials)
  • Factor for Success: Historical Context anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4; example, for teacher reference)
  • Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart (begun in Lesson 5; added to during Work Time B; see supporting Materials)
  • Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart (begun in Lesson 5; example, for teacher reference)
  • Factor for Success: Support from Decision Makers anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6; added to during Work Time B; see supporting Materials)
  • Factor for Success: Support from Decision Makers anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6; example, for teacher reference)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plan (for teacher reference; see the Tools page)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

"I can summarize an informational text read aloud."

"I can gather evidence that supports how people or events led to Jackie Robinson's success."

  • Turn and Talk, and select volunteers to share out:

"What were your challenges as you listened to and summarized the chapter read in the previous lesson?" (Responses will vary.)

"What were your successes?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students that they will practice listening to and summarizing a new chapter from Promises to Keep, and then reread the chapters they have read so far to gather more evidence of factors that led to Jackie's success.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension and engagement: Invite students to share one way that they worked toward similar learning targets in previous lessons. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Activating Prior Knowledge) Activate students' prior knowledge of the information in Promises to Keep by inviting them to orally summarize the previous chapter with a partner. Explain that thinking about what happened in the text so far will help prepare them for active listening, and support them in summarizing text read aloud.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud and Summarizing: Promises to Keep, Pages 28-29 (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher and display page 28 of Promises to Keep.
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time A of Lesson 6 to guide students through listening to and summarizing pages 28-29 in Promises to Keep, "Why My Father?"
    • Invite students to examine the photographs on page 29 and share what they notice and wonder.
    • Read pages 28-29 aloud, asking students what the text is about.
    • Review what it means to take running notes and how it can help them summarize a text they hear read aloud. Review how to use the Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher.
    • Reread page 28, inviting students to record running notes and questions in the appropriate spots on their note-catcher. Repeat with page 29.
    • Invite students to share any new or unfamiliar Vocabulary from this chapter, adding any new words to the Academic Word Wall and Domain-Specific Word Wall, and inviting students to add translations in home languages.
    • Invite students to turn to an elbow partner to share the main ideas and key details of the chapter, reminding them they should explain these things in their summaries.
    • Invite students to write a summary of "Why My Father?" Circulate to support students as needed, reminding them to refer to the Criteria for an Effective Summary anchor chart as needed. Refer to Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher (example, for teacher reference).
    • Select volunteers to share their summaries.
    • Invite students to reflect on what they just read. Review respect on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and invite students to share their reflections.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Consider adding visual support (a quick sketch or photograph) for new Vocabulary words as they are added to the Word Walls. (MMR)
  • For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Provide options for expression by offering a copy of the Listening Closely: "Why My Father?" note-catcher that includes lines. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Taking Notes) Consider inviting a student to model and think aloud the process for taking running notes before asking students to do so independently. Remind students that when taking notes, they don't have to write in complete sentences.
  • For ELLs: (Determining Main Idea from Running Notes) Remind students to identify key details that are connected to one another to support them in determining the main ideas of "Why My Father?" Invite them to write the main idea next to the connected key details in the margins of the note-catcher, and to follow the same process for writing summaries as in previous lessons.
  • For ELLs: (Verb Tense: Identifying Shifts) Invite students to identify one or two verbs in their summaries, and explain the meaning the verb tenses convey. Challenge students to identify verbs that show appropriate shifts in verb tense, and to explain why this shift is appropriate. (Example: "In the sentence '... Sharon Robinson explains why Branch Rickey chose Jackie Robinson ...' the verb explains is written in the simple present tense and conveys that the author's words are the subject of present discussion. The verb chose is written in the simple past and conveys that the action happened in the past, and was not ongoing.") As students share, provide any needed clarification and add the examples to the Verb Tenses anchor chart from Lesson 2.

B. Rereading to Gather Evidence: Factors for Success (20 minutes)

  • Focus students on the following resources:
    • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart
    • Factor for Success: Historical Context anchor chart
    • Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart
    • Factor for Success: Support from Decision Makers anchor chart
  • Using a total participation technique, select responses from the group:

"What is the guiding question that these anchor charts are helping us think about?" (What factors can contribute to an individual's success in a changing society?)

"How have we been using these anchor charts?" (We have been recording examples of factors that led to Jackie's success in breaking the color barrier in baseball and evidence from Promises to Keep.)

  • If productive, cue students with a challenge:

"What if we didn't create the anchor charts? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • Point out that so far, each factor for success chart has evidence only from certain chapters of the book, even though there is evidence in other chapters. For example, students used pages 10-17 to identify people working toward the same goal as Jackie during the same time period and recorded these on the Factor for Success: Historical Context anchor chart, but there are other examples of this in other parts of the book that they have read so far.
  • Tell students that in a moment, they will work in small groups to reread the book and find additional examples and evidence for one of the factors for success they have identified so far. First, though, they will practice as a class.
  • Invite students to take out their copies of Promises to Keep. Display and invite students to turn to page 6.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"Reread pages 6 and 7. What is a personal quality that led to Jackie's success? Give an example from the text to support your thinking." (Responses will vary.)

  • For students who may need additional support with motivation and sustained effort: Continue to provide feedback that is timely and informational as students share examples of the factors for Jackie Robinson's success. (MME)
  • For ELLs: (Jigsaw Reading) Allow students to be responsible for different, smaller portions of the text and then report back to the larger group with examples and evidence for the factor for success their group is focused on.
  • For ELLs: (Sticky Notes for Evidence) Consider using sticky notes to identify examples and evidence for a factor of success. Think aloud the cognitive process for determining evidence. (Example: "We are looking for ways that personal qualities contributed to Jackie Robinson's success. Can anyone help me find evidence for that? I will put a sticky note where I find the evidence so I can go back to it for more context when we share as a class.")
  • For ELLs: (Sentence Frames: Heavier Support) Invite more proficient students to create sentence frames for students who need heavier support to use when sharing ideas during the Think-Pair-Share protocol. (Example: One factor that helps a person be successful in a changing society is ___. For instance, __.)

Work Time, continued 

  • As students share out, capture their responses on the Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart. Refer to Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Move students into predetermined groups.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and invite them to read the habits of character on the chart to themselves. Tell students to choose one habit to focus on as they work with their group today.
  • Post and review the following directions:
  1. Review the factor for success chart for your group.
  2. Reread pages 6-29, looking for additional examples and evidence of your group's factor for Jackie Robinson's success.
  3. Record the examples and evidence your group finds on your group's factor for success chart.
  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Circulate to support students as they work and to identify common issues to use as whole group teaching points. Refer to the following resources as necessary:
    • Factor for Success: Support from Decision Makers anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
    • Factor for Success: Historical Context anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
    • Factor for Success: Personal Qualities anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • After 15 minutes, refocus whole group. Invite each group to share with the class the additional examples and evidence they gathered.
  • If productive, cue students to compare ideas:

"How is what _____ said the same as/different from what _____ said? I'll give you time to think and write." (Responses will vary.)

  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the second learning target and the habit from the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart they decided to focus on today.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Research Reading Share (15 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them specifically of integrity. In the context of research reading at home, this means trying to read each day, even when it is hard to do so, and if it isn't possible, being honest when recording the dates and pages read in your journal.
  • Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plan on the Tools page to guide students through a research reading share or use your own routine.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess how well they showed respect and integrity in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with Vocabulary: Check for comprehension by asking students to share a time when they showed integrity. Ask:

"When did you show integrity?"

"Can you think of a time when it was hard to do the right thing, but you did it anyway?" (MMR)

  • For students who may need additional support with understanding integrity: Provide examples of showing integrity. (Example: Doing the right thing even if the teacher is not looking at you or not looking at someone else's assessment and copying his or her answers.) (MMR)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Students may benefit from discussing and responding to their prompt orally, either with a partner or a family member or by recording their response. (MMAE)
  • For students who may need additional support with reading: Continue to support students in selecting a prompt to respond to, rephrasing the prompt, and thinking aloud possible responses. (MMR)

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