Close Reading: Esperanza Rising “Las Papayas” and Article 23 of the UDHR | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA G5:M1:U1:L5

Close Reading: Esperanza Rising “Las Papayas” and Article 23 of the UDHR

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RI.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RI.5.4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
  • RL.5.5: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • L.5.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • L.5.4a: Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • L.5.4b: Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
  • L.5.4c: Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can describe how pages 23-38 of Esperanza Rising contribute to the overall structure of the story. (RL.5.1, RL.5.5)
  • I can answer questions about an article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by referring to the text. (RI.5.1, RI.5.4, L.5.4b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR (RI.5.1, RI.5.4, L.5.4b)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

B. Engaging the Reader: "Las Papayas" of Esperanza Rising (20 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Making Connections between the UDHR and "Las Papayas" (10 minutes)

B. Guided Close Reading: Article 23 of the UDHR (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Reread "Las Papayas" on pages 23-38 and complete Esperanza Rising: Questions about "Las Papayas" in your Unit 1 Homework.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students read the next chapter of Esperanza Rising, "Las Papayas," and analyze how the chapter fits into the overall structure of the text (RL.5.1, RL.5.5). They then make connections between this chapter and the UDHR, looking for evidence of threats to human rights, before digging into Article 23 of the UDHR through a guided close read (RI.5.1, RI.5.4, L.5.4).
  • The lesson is written for "Las Papayas" to be a teacher read-aloud, but it can be organized in different ways to meet the needs of your students. For example, students could read the chapter in pairs or triads, taking turns to read, with a teacher-led smaller group of students who need additional support.
  • Many articles of the UDHR could be applied to each chapter. Students may make suggestions other than those recorded on the How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).
  • Throughout the close read, students answer selected response questions. At the end of the lesson, they consider the strategies they used to answer those questions and the strategies are recorded on an anchor chart for reference throughout the year.
  • This lesson is the final in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O'Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O'Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K-6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). As the modules progress, Goal 2, 3, and 4 Conversation Cues will be gradually introduced. Goal 1 Conversation Cues encourage all students to talk and be understood. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.
  • Students practice their fluency in this lesson by following along and reading silently in their heads as the teacher reads Article 3 of the UDHR aloud during Opening B.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is on working to become an ethical person. The characteristic that students practice is respect, as volunteers share out personal reflections on what happened in Esperanza Rising.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to human rights. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In previous lessons, students read pages 4-22, "Las Uvas," of Esperanza Rising, learned about the historical setting of the novel, and made connections between that chapter and the UDHR. In this lesson, they read a new chapter of the novel, analyze how the chapter fits into the overall structure of the text, and make connections between the chapter and the UDHR.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support completing their Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR. Consider placing those who will need additional support in one group to receive teacher support.

Assessment guidance:

  • As students are working in pairs to answer the close reading questions, look for common errors to use as teaching points and also strong models to share whole group.
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Reading Fluency Checklist to collect baseline fluency data as students read Esperanza Rising in Opening B.  See the Tools page.
  • Consider using the Reading: Foundational Skills Informal Assessment: Phonics and Word Recognition Checklist (Grade 5) to collect baseline fluency data as students read Esperanza Rising in Opening B.  See the Tools page.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students will identify the main ideas of this article and write a summary. They will then revise their summaries after a mini lesson on summary writing.
  • The Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart introduced in this lesson will be referred to throughout the module and the school year.

In Advance

  • Strategically pair students for work in this lesson, with at least one strong reader per pair.
  • Prepare:
    • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Technology necessary to play "Workers' Rights" in Work Time B (see Technology and Multimedia).
  • Preview the Close Reading Guide: Article 23 of the UDHR to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Review the Red Light, Green Light protocol (see Classroom Protocols).
  • Post: Learning targets, Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart, Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart, Experiences with Threats against Human Rights anchor chart, Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart, How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart, and Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: "Workers' Rights." Video. Youth for Human Rights. Youth for Human Rights, n.d. Web. 20 Apr. 2016. Note the available translations of both the videos and accompanying website text.
  • Work Time B: For students who will benefit from hearing the texts read aloud multiple times, consider using a text-to-speech tool like Natural Reader, SpeakIt! for Google Chrome, or the Safari reader. Note that to use a web-based text-to-speech tool like SpeakIt! or Safari reader, you will need to create an online doc, such as a Google Doc, containing the text.
  • Work Time B: Students complete their note-catchers online--for example, in a Google Form.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Create the Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart in an online format--for example, a Google Doc--to share with families to practice skills at home.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.B.6, 5.I.B.8, and 5.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing a safe space with time to reflect on the sensitive events in Esperanza Rising. Students investigate the language of Article 23 of the UDHR during a close read.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to complete the complex close read in the amount of time allotted. Consider focusing on fewer sections of Article 23--for example, just Sections 1 and 2 (see Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite a student to paraphrase the events of Esperanza Rising and the key points of Article 23 in more comprehensible language for those who need heavier support.
  • In Work Time A, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence in Esperanza Rising before asking the prepared questions. (Example: "What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let's see if we can answer them together.")
  • Encourage students to add to the graphic organizer they began in Lesson 2 to chart (and illustrate) the main events in pages 23-38 of Esperanza Rising against the structure of the story. Ask them how they might incorporate Article 23 from this lesson. Invite them to explain this graphic organizer to students who need heavier support.

For heavier support:

  • During the reading for gist of Esperanza Rising and the close reading of Article 23, stop often to check for comprehension. Dictate key sentences for students to recite so that they practice using verbal language. Encourage them to act out and sketch key sentences.
  • Transform the investigation of the How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart into a kinesthetic activity. Copy the new cells of the anchor chart onto separate cards or sticky notes. Students can paste the cards into the correct location on the anchor chart.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Throughout this unit, students make connections between Esperanza Rising and the UDHR. To support comprehension and make your expectations explicit, provide multiple representations of this connection. For instance, whenever a learning support requires making a connection between the two texts, provide a symbol, word, or phrase that shows the connection (see Meeting Students' Needs column).
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Students who may need additional support with reading can benefit from engaging with the unfamiliar text in different ways. Consider pre-selecting important sentences or chucks from this section of the text and preparing scaffolded questions to help support comprehension (see Meeting Students' Needs column). Also consider highlighting key portions of the text and asking students to identify how they are examples of threats to human rights. This relieves students from wading through large portions of text and allows them to more readily demonstrate their comprehension.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Throughout this unit, students reflect and evaluate their own progress toward their learning goals. Some may feel threatened by the public nature of this evaluation. Consider offering choice about how students report their progress, including a non-public method that is only for the teacher (see Meeting Students' Needs column).

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • threatened (L)
  • unemployment, conditions, favorable, just, discrimination, equal, remuneration, existence, dignity (T)

Materials

  • Esperanza Rising (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Experiences with Threats against Human Rights anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Opening B; see supporting materials)
  • Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Vocabulary logs (from Lesson 3; one per student)
  • Red, yellow, and green objects (one of each per student)
  • Simplified version of the UDHR (from Lesson 4; one per student)
  • How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Sticky notes (four per student)
  • Quoting Accurately from the Text handout (one per student and one to display)
  • "Workers' Rights" (video; play in entirety; see Teaching Notes)
  • Article 23 of the UDHR (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Article 23 of the UDHR (for teacher reference)
    • Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR (one per student)
    • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
    • Affix List (from Lesson 4; one per student)
    • Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR (example, for teacher reference)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Domain-Specific Word Wall (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Closing and Assessment)
  • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Move students into pairs and invite them to label themselves A and B.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can describe how pages 23-38 of Esperanza Rising contribute to the overall structure of the story."

"I can answer questions about an article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by referring to the text."

  • Tell students that in this lesson they will read a new chapter of Esperanza Rising, make connections to the UDHR, then dig into an article of the UDHR that is connected to this chapter of Esperanza Rising.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with memory: Ask students to recall and describe one way that they worked toward the first learning target in Lesson 3. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Check student comprehension of the second learning target by asking them to refer to page 4 of Esperanza Rising to answer this question: "When does the chapter 'Las Uvas' take place?" ("six years later," after Esperanza and Papa listened to the earth's heartbeat) (MMR)
  • When reviewing the first learning target, refer to the text structure chart that you have been using so far to activate prior knowledge. (MMR)

B. Engaging the Reader: "Las Papayas" of Esperanza Rising (20 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve their copies of Esperanza Rising and to turn to page 23, "Las Papayas."
  • Begin by pointing out the title of this chapter and select volunteers to share:

"What does 'Las Papayas' mean in English? How do you know?" (papayas; it says so underneath "Las Papayas")

  • Add Las Papayas to the Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read aloud pages 23-38, adding words to the Spanish/English Dictionary anchor chart as they come up. Invite Spanish speakers to provide the translation and to record the Spanish on the anchor chart.
  • After reading, invite students to reflect on the following question by thinking, writing, or drawing. Students must be silent when they do this:

"What did this part of the story make you think about?"

  • After 3 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them of the habit of character recorded: respect, as some students may be sharing out things that are very personal and meaningful to them.
  • Invite volunteers to share out what this part of the story made them think about. Do not force anyone to share their ideas with the group.
  • As students share out, capture any threats against human rights they share on the Experiences with Threats against Human Rights anchor chart.
  • Focus students on the Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart. Invite them to turn and talk to their partner, and then cold call students to share out:

"What is the gist of this chapter?" (Esperanza's father had left the land their house is on to Esperanza's uncle, who now wants to marry her mother.)

"Looking at the key, where do you think this part of the story fits into the structure? Why?" (rising action; we know that more things are going to happen to Esperanza and her mother because of what her uncle wants)

  • Add this to the anchor chart. Refer to Structure of Esperanza Rising anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to share any new words, adding any unfamiliar words to their vocabulary logs. Add any new words to the academic word wall and domain-specific word wall, and invite students to add translations in native languages.
  • Distribute red, yellow, and green objects.
  • Tell students they are now going to use the Red Light, Green Light protocol to reflect on their progress toward the first learning target. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 3 and review as necessary. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through the protocol using the first learning target.
  • Note students showing red or yellow objects so you can check in with them in the next lessons when this learning target is revisited.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with memory: Before reading, invite students to turn to an elbow partner and summarize the first two chapters of Esperanza Rising in 30 seconds or less. Have them share out and give them feedback on their language use and summarizing skill. Then, after reading, invite them to turn to their partner and summarize once again, this time in 15 seconds or less. Repeat the feedback process. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of chunks from a key sentence of this chapter of Esperanza Rising. Write and display student responses next to the chunks. (MMR, MMAE) Example:
    • "Place your finger on this sentence: As you know, it is not customary to leave land to women and since Luis was the banker on the loan, Sixto left the land to him." Read the sentence aloud as students follow along.
    • "What is the gist of this sentence?" (Responses will vary.)
    • "Place your finger on leave land. What does leave land mean? What did Papa leave Mama?" (Before someone dies, he or she may write a document saying whom they want to give their property; the house)
    • "Place your finger on left the land. What is the difference between leave and left?" Invite students to draw a timeline illustrating their responses. (infinitive verb to express an everyday, general truth; past tense verb to express a completed action)
    • "Why did Sixto leave the land to Luis?" (When he died, Sixto was still paying a mortgage loan for his house, and Luis was in charge of that loan at the bank.)
    • "Place your finger on it is not customary. What does this phrase mean? What is not customary in your home culture?" (It is against tradition or practice.)
    • "Place your finger on since. I wonder why the author wrote the word since. What word can we replace since with in this sentence and keep the same meaning? Are there other meanings for since? How can we use since in our writing?" Tell students you will give them time to think and discuss with their partner. (Since joins two independent clauses and signals that the author will introduce a reason. It links two complete sentences into one more sophisticated one that shows a reason. Because. Since can also mean 'from a specific time or event until now,' e.g., since 2013. We can use since to join two independent clauses and signal that we will give a reason. We can also use it to signal a time span.)
    • "Can you complete this sentence with something from your life? 'Since learning a new language is hard work, _____.'" Tell students you will give them time to think and discuss with their partner. (Responses will vary, but may include: Since learning a new language is hard work, I try to read a lot.)
    • "Now what do you think is the gist of this sentence? What do you think about the ideas expressed here?" (People believed women shouldn't own property, so Luis, who managed the mortgage, got the land.)
    • "What connection can you make between your understanding of this sentence and your understanding of human rights?" (Mama's right to ownership was taken away--Article 17.)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Ask:

"What are the series of conflicts and crises in this chapter leading toward climax? What do you think will happen next?" (the papaya delivery for the canceled fiesta, Papa's land being left to Tio Luis, Tio Luis' proposal to Mama and her refusal, Tio Luis' threats, Miguel's family's plan to leave for the U.S., the class divide between Miguel and Esperanza) (MMR)

  • For students who may feel uncomfortable sharing their progress on meeting the learning targets publicly: Minimize risk by providing students with a sheet of paper on which they can select a color for each learning target in private. This provides you with useful data for future instruction and helps students to monitor their own learning. (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Making Connections between the UDHR and "Las Papayas" (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve their simplified version of the UDHR.
  • Ensure students understand that each of the numbered items on their list is an article of the UDHR.
  • Post the following question and tell students that they are going to have 5 minutes to work with their partner to look over the simplified UDHR text and "Las Papayas" in Esperanza Rising to answer it:

"Which human rights have been threatened in 'Las Papayas'?"

  • Focus students on the How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart.
  • Remind students of what the word threatened means.
  • Tell students that when they find an instance of this, they need to record the number of the article that it goes against on a sticky note and stick it in their book to remind them. Model an example.
  • Distribute sticky notes and invite students to begin working.
  • After 5 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Cold call students to share out. As they share out, capture their responses on the anchor chart. Encourage students to provide you with accurate quotes from the text and mark those quotes using quotation marks. Refer to How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Display and distribute the Quoting Accurately from the Text handout and then underline the quote(s) from the text recorded on the How Were the Human Rights of the Characters in Esperanza Rising Threatened? anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner, and then cold call students to share out:

"I have quoted accurately from the text here. What do you notice about quoting accurately from the text?" (You used quotation marks at the beginning and the end of the words from the book and made sure the quote is exactly what the text says word for word.)

  • As students share out, connect their responses to the criteria on the Quoting Accurately from the Text handout.
  • For ELLs: To provide heavier support, when the learning target requires students to make connections between Esperanza Rising and the UDHR, display a note that symbolizes the learning target and say the learning target. Example:

"Las Papayas" <-> Articles 17, 23

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Consider marking key sections of the chapter and asking students why these sections illustrate threats to human rights. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Say: "Quoting sources is an important academic and career skill in the United States. In the United States, you can borrow important ideas from the original text, but you must use your own words to explain the ideas when you write and you must place quotation marks around the quotes you borrow. In addition, you must tell your reader where the ideas and quotes came from. Otherwise, you might get into serious trouble."

B. Guided Close Reading: Article 23 of the UDHR (20 minutes)

  • Reread page 36 beginning with "My father and I have lost faith in our country" to "... we have a chance to be more than servants."
  • Ensure students understand that in this chapter, Miguel explains that Esperanza's uncles would treat his family like animals if they stayed and that this threatens their human rights and goes against many of the articles of the UDHR.
  • Play the "Workers' Rights" video.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner, and then cold call students to share out:

"From this video, what do you think you will see in this article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?" (being paid the right amount for the work you do)

  • Distribute and display Article 23 of the UDHR.
  • Distribute the Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR.
  • Guide students through the Close Reading Guide: Article 23 of the UDHR (for teacher reference). Refer to the guide for how to integrate the Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, and Affix List.
  • Also refer to Close Reading Note-catcher: Article 23 of the UDHR (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Add any new words to the academic word wall and domain-specific word wall and invite students to add translations in native languages.
  • Refocus whole group and remind students that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is also something we should follow in our behavior and actions toward one another, as we should all respect each other's human rights. Invite students to turn and talk with their partner, and then cold call students to share out:

"From watching the video and reading this article, what have you learned about how to treat others?" (When working, everyone should be treated equally and is entitled to good working conditions.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to expand the conversation about how to treat others:

"Can you give an example?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Ensure students understand that this also applies at school as well as in the workplace.
  • For ELLs: Consider creating home language groups and inviting students to watch the video or read the text in one of the many home languages provided at the Youth for Human Rights website.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with expressive language: To provide lighter support, invite intermediate students to create sentence frames to bolster participation during the turn and talk. Invite students who need heavier support to use the frames. (Example: "The video made me think I should treat others _____ because _____.") (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Tell students that the questions they answered with multiple options throughout the close read are called selected response or multiple choice questions.
  • Select volunteers to share strategies they used to answer the selected response questions. As students share out, capture their responses on the Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart. Refer to Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner, and then use equity sticks to select students to share out:

"How did the strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart help you to better understand the text?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students they are now going to use the Red Light, Green Light protocol to reflect on their progress toward the second learning target. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through the protocol using the second learning target.
  • Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they showed respect in this lesson.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reread "Las Papayas" on pages 23-38 and complete Esperanza Rising: Questions about "Las Papayas" in your Unit 1 Homework.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 2. (MMAE, MMR)
  • For ELLs: To provide heavier support, consider providing students with the words and phrases that show how Esperanza is responding and inviting students to explain how this language demonstrates Esperanza's response. Take a similar tack with the second question about Mama.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up