Answering Questions about a Text: Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G4:M4:U1:L3

Answering Questions about a Text: Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.4.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.4.3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).
  • RL.4.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • RL.4.7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • L.4.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • L.4.5c: Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms). 

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to peers about their reading fluency. (RF.4.4)
  • I can make connections between Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest and artwork inspired by the text. (RL.4.7)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Stars and steps on sticky notes (RF.4.4)
  • Reading Guide: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (RL.4.1, RL.4.3, RL.4.4, RL.4.7, L.4.4, L.4.5c)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Fluent Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading in Triads: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (40 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Making Connections to Real-Life Events (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Complete the Synonyms and Antonyms Practice II in your Unit 1 Homework.

B. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive I Practice: The Hope Chest in your Unit 1 Homework.

C. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Opening B, students review the Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart to prepare for a peer critique of their reading fluency (RF.4.4). This prepares students for Part I of the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment in the next lesson, in which students read a new excerpt of The Hope Chest aloud.
  • In Work Time A, students read Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest in reading triads and provide one another with peer feedback. They then work with their triads to answer questions about the text (RL.4.1, RL.4.3, RL.4.4, RL.4.7, RF.4.4, L.4.4, L.4.5c).
  • In the Closing, students read some of the excerpts of informational text in the back of The Hope Chest and make connections between what was happening in real life and what is happening in the book. Part of this discussion is the use of the word colored in The Hope Chest to describe African American people. This can be a very sensitive issue to discuss, and depending on the population of the class, this may require more discussion than is allocated. If that is the case, consider not reading the informational text outlined, and instead extending the discussion. Continuously remind students of what respect, empathy, and compassion looks and sounds like on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart.
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to become ethical people by showing respect when providing peer feedback--and empathy and compassion while reading and discussing the text.
  • Recall that the research reading that students complete for homework helps build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to inequality and ratifying the 19th Amendment. This kind of reading continues over the course of the module.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 2, students read Chapter 2 of The Hope Chest in reading triads and answered questions. They follow a similar routine in this lesson to read Chapter 3 and answer questions.
  • Continue to use Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support with reading the chapter and answering the questions. Consider inviting students who need additional support to a group for focused teacher guidance.

Assessment guidance:

  • Review student reading guides to identify common issues to use as whole group teaching points before the assessment in the next lesson.

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students will follow a similar routine to read Chapter 4 of The Hope Chest; however, they will answer text-dependent questions independently as part of the mid-unit assessment.
  • In the next lesson, students also will read a new excerpt of The Hope Chest aloud for a reading fluency assessment.

In Advance

  • Consider:
    • If any students may be sensitive to the issues that this chapter raises based on cultural background and family history. Consider explaining to families that students will be reading about and discussing inequality so that the families can appropriately prepare them.
    • Whether discussing the topic of the Closing with students who may be affected might help determine the most sensitive way to facilitate the discussion.
  • Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the language goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the language goals provided to best meet your students' needs.
  • Review the Questions We Can Ask during a Language Dive anchor chart as needed (begun in Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 5).
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.B.6, 4.I.B.7, 4.I.B.8, 4.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by following a similar routine as Lesson 2 of reading in triads and answering questions about a chapter of The Hope Chest, allowing the opportunity for students to receive peer feedback on reading fluency in preparation for the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment in the next lesson, and including artwork that provides a visual representation of some of the important details in the text.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to keep pace with the class and comprehend the large volume of text read in triads during Work Time A. They may also find it challenging to express the connections between Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest and the artwork inspired by the text. Consider previewing the chapter with students before the lesson, giving them the opportunity ahead of time to ask questions and clarify any vocabulary they do not understand (see Levels of support and Meeting Students' Needs).
  • In Work Time A, ELLs may participate in an optional Language Dive that guides them through the meaning of a sentence from Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest. The focus of this Language Dive is on demonstrating understanding of figurative language and word relationships, and deepening their understanding of why people want to effect social change. Students then apply their understanding of the meaning and structure of this sentence when discussing the inequalities that Violet and Myrtle faced during this lesson, and when learning about idioms in future lessons. Refer to the Tools page for additional information regarding a consistent Language Dive routine.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, challenge students to think of synonyms for busy that they could use to describe the artwork of the New York City street at night (active, bustling, hopping). Then invite them to think of antonyms for busy (inactive, idle). This will allow students to continue to build their knowledge and understanding of synonyms and antonyms, while also providing them with the opportunity to further visualize the setting of Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, consider providing sentence frames to support students in making connections between Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest and artwork inspired by the text, both orally and in writing on their reading guide. (Example: The artwork shows ___________. It reflects the description _________.)
  • Consider reading Chapter 3 aloud to students before the lesson, and inviting students to practice reading aloud a section of the chapter that they can then be responsible for reading in their triads during Work Time A.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to ensure that all students have access to the directions in each activity, and that they feel comfortable with the expectations. Vary the ways in which teacher expectations are conveyed for each activity or task. Consider engaging in a clarifying discussion about the directions, or creating an outline of the steps for each activity.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support a range of fine motor abilities and writing need by offering students options for writing utensils. Alternatively, consider supporting students' expressive skills by offering partial dictation of student responses.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to provide prompts and sentences frames for those students who require them to be successful in peer interactions and collaboration. Also support students in sustaining effort and/or attention by restating the goal of the activity.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • inspired (L)
  • conscious, belatedly (T)

Materials

  • Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • The Hope Chest (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Peer Critique anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Sticky notes (two different colors; one of each per student)
  • Reading Guide: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (one per student)
  • Reading Guide: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (example, for teacher reference)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Vocabulary logs (from Module 1; one per student)
  • Language Dive Guide I: The Hope Chest (optional; for ELLs; for teacher reference)
    • Questions We Can Ask during a Language Dive anchor chart (begun in Module 3)
    • Language Dive Chunk Chart I: The Hope Chest (optional; for ELLs; for teacher reference)
    • Language Dive Sentence Strip Chunks I: The Hope Chest (optional; for ELLs; one to display)
    • Language Dive Note-catcher I: The Hope Chest (optional; for ELLs; one per student and one to display)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to peers about their reading fluency."

"I can make connections between Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest and artwork inspired by the text."

  • Remind students they have seen similar learning targets in previous lessons in this module and in previous modules.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with motivation: (Working on Same Learning Target) Invite students to discuss how they previously worked toward each learning target. (MME)

B. Reviewing Fluent Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that they read Chapters 1 and 2 in their reading triads, and that reading in a reading triad involves reading aloud.
  • Tell students that in the next lesson they are going to read aloud a new excerpt of The Hope Chest as part of their mid-unit assessment. To prepare for this, they are going to provide some peer feedback in their reading triads in this lesson.
  • Direct students' attention to the Fluent Readers Do These Things anchor chart and use total participation techniques to select students to read aloud the criteria.
  • Tell students that they will be using these criteria when providing feedback to their peers.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and invite them to read the habits of character on the chart to themselves. Remind students once again of the respect, compassion, and empathy habits and to practice them as they read more of the text in their reading triads in this lesson, and to provide peer feedback.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Provide brief examples of dysfluent reading (e.g., too fast, monotone, choppy) and invite students to identify why the reading does not sound fluent. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Modeling and Thinking Aloud: Reading Fluency) After each criterion is read aloud, model that criterion before moving on to the next. Consider using the last two pages of Chapter 2 to do so, projecting the text to provide students with concrete examples of each criterion. For example, explicitly point out quotation marks when reading dialogue, and exclamation points when reading with excitement. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading in Triads: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (40 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve their copies of The Hope Chest, and review the process of reading in triads as necessary.
  • Tell students they will provide one star and one step to each member of their triad after the first page they read aloud. Review the Peer Critique anchor chart as necessary.
  • Distribute sticky notes and Reading Guide:The Hope Chest, Chapter 3. Tell students that once they have finished reading the chapter, they will silently reflect on what they read and then answer questions about it.
  • Post and review the following directions:
    1. Partner A reads the first page, while partners B and C look and listen for one star and one step.
    2. Partner A stops reading at the end of the page. Partners B and C provide one star and one step each.
    3. Repeat steps 1-2 with partner B reading and receiving feedback, and then partner C.
    4. Continue taking turns reading the chapter.
    5. Spend 2-3 minutes reflecting silently and writing, drawing, or thinking. Someone in the triad keep time.
    6. Work together to use the text to answer the questions on your reading guide.
    7. Check your answers.
  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Remind students to refer to the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart and to record unfamiliar vocabulary in their vocabulary logs.
  • Circulate to support students as they read aloud, provide peer feedback, and answer the questions. Remind them to refer to the text to answer the questions.
  • When 5 minutes remain, refocus whole group.
  • Focus students on the artwork and ask the corresponding questions. Encourage students to analyze the image deeply.
  • Think-Triad-Share:

"Look at the use of open space in this picture. What does this help you understand about the New York City street that Violet tumbled onto?" (Responses will vary, but may include: There isn't much open space, so it looks very busy--there are people, animals, and vehicles everywhere.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response?" (Responses will vary.)

"What does it help you to understand about how Violet may have felt about New York City when she first arrived?" (Responses will vary, but may include: overwhelmed, scared)

  • Invite students to revise their responses to the first two questions about the connections between the artwork and text accordingly. Refer to Reading Guide: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Use total participation techniques to select students to share their answers for each of the questions. Continue to refer to Reading Guide: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3 (example, for teacher reference). Invite students to revise their answers. Spend sufficient time with the questions, making connections between the text and artwork inspired by the text.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the learning targets and how well they showed respect, compassion, and empathy.
  • For students who may need additional support with working memory: Invite them to first verbally share their answer to the question, then draw a line for each word they intend to write as they state their answer a second time. Remind students that this helps us organize our ideas for written expression. (MMAE)  
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with activating prior knowledge: (Summarizing) Before reading, invite students to summarize Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest in 1 minute or less (with feedback) and then again in 30 seconds or less with a partner. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: (Fishbowl: Providing Feedback on Reading Fluency) Before inviting students to begin reading, invite a confident triad to fishbowl the process of providing feedback, following each of the steps recorded on the board. Consider inviting students to use the last two pages of Chapter 3 to do so. This provides students with a model and minimizes confusion about the activity.
  • For ELLs: (Strategic Grouping) Continue to check in with triads and rearrange them as necessary to ensure the most supportive grouping.
  • For ELLs: (Language Dive) During or after Work Time A, guide students through a Language Dive. Refer to the Language Dive Guide I: The Hope Chest, the Questions We Can Ask during a Language Dive anchor chart, and Language Dive Chunk Chart I: The Hope Chest. Distribute and display Language Dive Sentence Strip Chunks I: The Hope Chest and Language Dive Note-catcher I: The Hope Chest.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Making Connections to Real-Life Events (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on page 36 and invite the whole group to chorally read the part at the bottom of the page beginning with "It was a black girl ..." and ending at "... two centuries in the past." Focus students on the word colored and explain that this was a term used to describe African Americans when this book was set, so they will come upon it many times in this text. Emphasize that what Violet thinks is "nice" is not the case anymore and is considered insulting, and if necessary, discuss with students appropriate terminology, inviting, if they want to and feel comfortable doing so, African American students to express the terms they feel comfortable with.
  • Invite students to turn to pages 266-267 of The Hope Chest and read aloud the pages from the beginning of page 266 to the end of 267 while students read along silently in their heads.
  • Think-Triad-Share:

"What connections can you make between these excerpts of informational text and what you have read so far in The Hope Chest?" (In Chloe's letters in Chapter 1, she describes how she was treating people with influenza, and in Chapter 2 Chloe talks about a reporter in the trenches during the war.)

"How does this informational text help you better understand The Hope Chest?" (Responses will vary, but may include: They now understand the war was happening in another place in the world and contributed to influenza.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?" (Responses will vary.)

  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Provide discussion questions to students before they engage with the text through oral reading. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Previewing Vocabulary) Consider previewing unfamiliar vocabulary words with students before reading pages 266-267. Additionally, invite students to share synonyms of key words to support them in their comprehension of this informational text (example: influenza = flu; mild = not serious; mutated = changed).

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Complete the Synonyms and Antonyms Practice II in your Unit 1 Homework.

B. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive I Practice: The Hope Chest in your Unit 1 Homework.

C. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: (Oral Response) Read aloud, discuss, and respond to your prompt orally with a partner, a family member, or a student from Grades 3 or 5, or record an audio response. 

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