Writing Opinion Texts: Revising a Broadside | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA G4:M3:U3:L11

Writing Opinion Texts: Revising a Broadside

You are here:

These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.4.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • RI.4.10: By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • W.4.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  • W.4.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • SL.4.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • L.4.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.4.1e: Form and use prepositional phrases.
  • L.4.1f: Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
  • L.4.1g: Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can correctly use frequently confused words in my writing. (L.4.1g)
  • I can revise my broadside for correct use of prepositional phrases, complete sentences, and frequently confused words. (W.4.1, W.4.5, L.4.1e, L.4.1f, L.4.1g)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Revised Patriot broadside (W.4.1, W.4.5, L.4.1e, L.4.1f, L.4.1g)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Frequently Confused Words (15 minutes)

B. Independent Practice: Revising a Broadside (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Independent Practice: Planning a Broadside (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Complete the Frequently Confused Words practice in your Unit 3 homework.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students revise their broadsides for the language skills focused on throughout the unit (L.4.1e, L.4.1f, L.4.1g). Before revising, students participate in a mini lesson about correctly using frequently confused words (L.4.1g).
  • In Opening A, students are guided through a research reading share to hold them accountable for their research reading homework. Consider using the Independent Reading: Sample Plans if you do not have your own independent reading review routines.
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to become ethical people by showing integrity as they participate in a research reading share.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In the previous lessons, students analyzed the structure of the model broadside using the Painted Essay(r) template and wrote their broadsides. They build on those foundations in this lesson.
  • Continue to use Goals 1-4 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may require additional support revising their broadsides. Continue to group them for teacher-led support as needed.

Assessment guidance:

  • Review students' broadsides to ensure that they have included all the necessary information. Continue to use common issues as teaching points for the whole group.
  • Consider using the Writing: Writing Informal Assessment: Observational Checklist for Writing and Language Skills to assess students' writing abilities in Work Time B (see the Tools page).

Down the road:

  • Students will write and revise a new broadside from the Loyalist perspective for the End of Unit 3 Assessment in Lessons 12-13. The scaffolding in the lessons leading up to the assessment will help students understand the steps they need to take to write a broadside independently.
  • Provide feedback on students' Mid-Unit 3 Assessments in preparation for returning them in the next lesson.

In Advance

  • Prepare a research reading share using the Independent Reading: Sample Plans or your own independent reading routine (see the Tools page).
  • Prepare the Frequently Confused Words anchor chart (see supporting Materials).
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-2 to create anchor charts to share with families, to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families, and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.C.10, 4.I.C.11, 4.I.C.12, 4.II.A.2, 4.II.A.3, 4.II.A.4, 4.II.A.5, 4.II.A.6, and 4.II.A.7

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by explicitly focusing on frequently confused words; displaying and referring to anchor charts that support students with prepositional phrases and complete sentences during the revision process; and following the same routine for planning a broadside as in Lesson 6.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to distinguish between frequently used words and phrases. Consider providing them with familiar practice before doing so with the module text. Additionally, it may be difficult for ELLs to determine the most relevant linking words and phrases to add to their writing in Work Time B, as well as the most supportive prepositional phrases. Consider highlighting key words and phrases for students to focus on in their revisions. See "for heavier support" and the Meeting Students' Needs column for specific suggestions.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite students to work as the expert in home language groups with students who need heavier support. The expert can explain how to use key English linking language such as and, also, another, and so in contrast with the usage in the home language. Provide the expert with simple sentences to link as a demonstration for other students.

For heavier support:

  • Consider creating index cards with sentences that include frequently confused words and corresponding images that are familiar to students. For example, on one index card, draw a picture of a sunny day. On the top of this index card write "son/sun" and underneath the picture write "The son was hot that day." Students can talk in pairs using prompts on the card. (Example: Partner A: "The son was hot that day." Partner B: "Son is used incorrectly here. It should be sun, the star that gives us light and warmth.") Include some examples that correctly use frequently confused words and some examples that incorrectly use them. Allow students to practice with these familiar examples before revising their writing.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Similar to previous lessons in this unit, this lesson offers a variety of visual anchors to cue students' thinking. Continue to support students by creating additional or individual anchor charts for reference and charting student responses during whole class discussions to aid with comprehension.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): This lesson offers several opportunities for students to engage in discussion with partners. Continue to support those who may need help with expressive language by providing sentence frames to help them organize their thoughts.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students plan their broadside, which will later be written as the End of Unit 3 Assessment. Continue to support students in sustaining effort and/or engagement by restating the goal of the activity.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • frequently (L)

Materials

  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plans (for teacher reference; see the Tools page)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Vocabulary logs (from Module 1; one per student)
  • Frequently Confused Words handout (one per student and one to display)
  • Frequently Confused Words handout (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Model Broadside: Quaker Perspective (from Lesson 5; one per student and one to display)
  • Opinion Writing Checklist (from Lesson 5; one per student and one to display)
  • Patriot broadside (begun in Lesson 7; added to during Work Time B; one per student)
  • Prepositional Phrases handout (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Writing Complete Sentences handout (from Module 1; one per student)
  • Characteristics of Broadsides anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part I Prompt (one per student and one to display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Opinion Writing Planning Graphic Organizer: End of Unit 3 Assessment (one per student)
  • Loyalist paragraph (from Unit 1, Lesson 4; one per student)
  • Units 1-2 texts and note-catchers (one of each per student)
    • "Revolutionary War, Part I"
    • Close Reading Note-catcher: "Revolutionary War, Part I"
    • "Loyalists"
    • Research Note-catcher: Loyalists
    • "Revolutionary War, Part II"
    • "An Incomplete Revolution"
    • Text-Dependent Questions: "An Incomplete Revolution"
    • "American Indians and the American Revolution"
    • Close Reading Note-catcher: "American Indians and the American Revolution"
  • Domain-Specific Word Wall (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Research Reading Share (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them specifically of integrity. In the context of research reading homework, this means trying to do it each day, even when it is tough to do so, and if it isn't possible, being honest when recording the dates and pages read in their journals.
  • Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plans to guide students through a research reading review or use your own routine.
  • For students who may need additional support with organizing their thinking for verbal expression: Consider meeting with students in advance to prep them for the research reading share and minimize the threat associated with sharing. (MMAE, MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can correctly use frequently confused words in my writing."

"I can revise my broadside for correct use of prepositional phrases, complete sentences, and frequently confused words."

  • Focus students on the first learning target. Underline frequently and use the Vocabulary strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart to review and/or determine its meaning (often, many times). Add it to the Academic Word Wall and invite students to add it to their Vocabulary logs.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension and engagement: Invite students to share what they learned about prepositional phrases from previous lessons. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Relating Words to Their Opposite) Invite students to demonstrate understanding of the word frequently by relating it to its opposite (rarely). Provide sentence frames. (Example: I frequently _____ [go to bed early] during the week because ______ [I have to wake up early for school]. I rarely _____ [stay up late] during the week because _____ [I have to wake up early for school].")

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Frequently Confused Words (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that one thing they will be revising their broadsides for today is words that sound alike but have different meanings.
  • Tell students they can check to see if they are using a word correctly by thinking about the meaning of the word and the meaning of the sentence.
  • Display and distribute the Frequently Confused Words handout.
  • Focus students on the sentence in the Example column of the handout:
    • "Its important, however, to stay uninvolved."
  • Underline the word its and tell students this is a word that is often confused. Write the word it's above its.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What does the word its mean?" (belonging to it)

"What does the word it's mean?" (contraction for it is)

  • Using the sentence in the Example column, model checking to see that the word is used correctly by thinking aloud about the meaning of its, the meaning of the sentence, and whether it's makes more sense with the meaning of the sentence. Model correcting its by crossing it out and writing it's above it. Invite students to make corrections on their copy. Refer to the Frequently Confused Words handout (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What other words can you think of that writers might frequently confuse?" (Responses will vary, but may include: to/two/too; won/one; there/their/they're.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses under "Frequently confused words" on the handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy. Refer to the Frequently Confused Words handout (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Focus students on the sentences at the bottom of the handout. Invite students to work with a partner to identify any words that sound like other words and might be misused, correcting them accordingly:
    • "As a Quaker, there is a lot of pressure, coming from both the Patriots and the Loyalists, to be involved in the war." (there/their/they're)
    • "Won of our beliefs is to treat everyone equally." (won/one)
    • "We know that staying true to you're principles means you may be fined, put into prison, or be called Loyalists and traitors." (your/you're, principles/principals)
  • Refocus whole group and select volunteers to share their corrections with the group.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the first learning target.
  • As time permits, focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and invite them to self-assess how well they collaborated during the mini lesson.
  • For students who struggle with oral language and processing: Allow ample wait time throughout the mini lesson. (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Frequently Confused Words Practice) Invite students to play "Am I Correct?" with the cards from "for heavier support." Put all index cards in a bag and invite a volunteer to pull one out and read the sentence on the card. Invite that student to call on another student to explain whether the frequently confused word was used correctly or incorrectly. The student who gave the explanation then repeats this process. Record the frequently confused words from the index cards on the Frequently Confused Words anchor chart.
  • For ELLs (Examples in Home Language) Invite students to share examples of frequently confused words in their home languages and explain the difference between each pair of words. Consider explaining that some languages include an accent on a letter and that the accent can change a word's meaning. (Example: esta, esta, esta: Esta es mi mochila. [Esta is used as a pronoun.]. Esta mochila es mia. [Esta is used as an adjective.]. La mochila esta aqui. [Esta is used as a verb.] Record these words on the Frequently Confused Words anchor chart.

B. Independent Practice: Revising a Broadside (15 minutes)

  • Use a process similar to that found in Work Time B of Lesson 9 to guide students through revising their writing. Note: Students' scope for revision will be larger than it was in Lesson 9, during which they largely focused on linking words and phrases.
  • Discuss the following characteristics on the Opinion Writing Checklist:
    • "L.4.1: My words and sentences follow the rules of writing."
    • "L.4.2, L.4.3b: My spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are correct."
    • "L.4.3, L.4.6, W.4.4: The words and sentences I use are appropriate for this task, purpose, and audience."
  • Invite students to read their Patriot broadside.
  • As needed, review the Prepositional Phrases handout and Writing Complete Sentences handout.
  • Invite students to refer to the following Materials as they revise:
    • Model Broadside: Quaker Perspective
    • Characteristics of Broadsides anchor chart
    • Frequently Confused Words handout
  • Circulate to support students as they revise. Identify common issues to use as whole group teaching points.
  • Refocus whole group and invite students to record "Y" for "Yes" and the date in the final column of their Opinion Writing Checklist if they feel the criteria marked on their checklists have been achieved in their writing in this lesson.
  • Use a checking for understanding technique (e.g., Red Light, Green Light or Thumb-O-Meter) for students to self-assess against the second learning target.
  • For students who may need additional support with motivation: Make this activity relevant by reminding students that real authors revise their work many times because it improves their writing skills. (MME)
  • For ELLs: (Displaying Linking Words and Phrases) Consider displaying the most frequently used linking words and phrases and those that may be most useful for students in their revisions. Consider providing time for students to use their online or paper translation dictionary to translate the words.
  • For ELLs: (Using Common Collocations) Tell students it is common to use the word that following phrases that state opinions, such as I think and I believe. Invite students to practice using that with these phrases and to look for these phrases when revising. (Example: "I believe that we should fight for our independence from Britain.")
  • For ELLs: (Strategic Grouping) Consider inviting students to work in groups with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in the group and support students as they make revisions to their writing.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Practice: Planning a Broadside (15 minutes)

  • Distribute and display the End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part I Prompt and read it aloud.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What will you be working on for the end of unit assessment?" (writing a broadside from the Loyalist perspective)

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What perspective will this broadside be written from?" (Loyalist)

"What opinion did colonists who were Loyalists have on the American Revolution?" (They did not want independence from Great Britain.)

  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Distribute the Opinion Writing Planning Graphic Organizer: End of Unit 3 Assessment. Remind students that they have already used this planner in this unit to plan their first broadside.
  • Tell students that they are going to begin planning their new broadside for the End of Unit 3 Assessment during the remaining time in this lesson.
  • Share that their end of unit assessment will be an assessed piece of work, so they should work on their planning independently.
  • Invite students to plan their broadsides. Remind them that they have discussed reasons not to be independent from Britain in their Loyalist paragraphs and to refer to this, their Units 1-2 texts and note-catchers, and the Domain-Specific Word Wall while planning.
  • Circulate to support students as they plan.
  • For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Offer choice with the graphic organizer by providing a template that includes lines within the boxes. (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: (Opinions/Reasons/Evidence Chart: Referencing) Invite students to refer to the Opinions/Reasons/Evidence chart to describe Robert's opinion, citing at least one reason and one example of evidence that support the Loyalist perspective.
  • For ELLs: (Jigsaw Learning) Use jigsaw learning. Allow students to be responsible for different texts from Units 1-2, and then report back to the larger group about the reasons they found not to be independent from Britain.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Complete the Frequently Confused Words practice in your Unit 3 homework.
  • Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.
  • Modify the amount or complexity of reading that struggling learners complete for homework. Provide sentence frames for their responses or allow them to share their learning in other ways, such as drawing or discussing what they've learned with their family, a partner, or the teacher.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: (Oral Response) Students may benefit from discussing and responding to their prompt orally, either with a partner or family member or by recording their response. (MMAE)

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up