Writing Informative Texts: Editing for Conventions | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G4:M2:U2:L11

Writing Informative Texts: Editing for Conventions

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.4.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.4.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • L.4.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.4.2a: Use correct capitalization.
  • L.4.2c: Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
  • L.4.2d: Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can check my peers' work for correct capitalization and spelling. (W.4.5, L.4.2a, L.4.2d)
  • I can check my peers' work for correct use of a comma before a coordinating conjunction. (W.4.5, L.4.2c)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Edits of informative piece (W.4.2, W.4.5, L.4.2)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Research Reading Share (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time 

A. Mini Lesson: Using Commas before Coordinating Conjunctions (10 minutes)

B. Guided Practice: Editing for Conventions (15 minutes)

C. Editing Stations (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4. Homework 

A. Complete Coordinating Conjunctions I in your Unit homework resources.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students edit their informative piece drafts for conventions of spelling, capitalization, and using a comma before a coordinating conjunction (W.4.2, W.4.5, L.4.2a, L.4.2c, L.4.2d). 
  • In Opening A, students share what they have read and learned from their independent reading texts. This sharing is designed as another measure for holding students accountable for their research reading completed for homework. This volume of reading promotes students' growing ability to read a variety of literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. (RI.4.10, RL.4.10, SL.4.1)
  • During Work Time A, students participate in a mini lesson on comma usage with coordinating conjunctions. They work with a partner to combine simple sentences into compound sentences using commas and coordinating conjunctions. See the Coordinating Conjunctions handout (for teacher reference) in the supporting materials.
  • During Work Time C, students move through three editing stations for spelling, capitalization, and punctuation. Before this, the teacher models how to make edits using a convention-less paragraph before students turn to their own work.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to animals and specifically animal defense mechanisms. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.
  • Students have the opportunity to practice their fluency in this lesson by following along and reading silently as the teacher reads the millipede informative piece draft aloud in Work Time B.
  • In this lesson, the habits of character focus are working to become ethical people and working to become effective learners. They are reminded of the characteristic: integrity when sharing their independent reading, and the characteristic: take responsibility because of the self-assessing and correcting they do when editing their writing.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 7-10, students worked to plan, draft, and revise their informative pieces. In this lesson, they continue the revision process by editing for conventions.
  • Continue to use Goals 1-3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas where students may need additional support:

  • During the mini lesson in Work Time A, students may need additional support with identifying independent clauses and may need to review grammar terminology such as subject and verb.
  • Given the 1-hour time constraint, there is limited time for re-teaching and repeated practice of the skills required in the language standards. As a result, students may need additional instruction on language conventions such as capitalization during the Additional Language and Literacy Block. 

Assessment guidance:

  • Refer to the characteristics related to L.4.1, L.4.2, and L.4.3b on the Informative Writing Checklist when assessing students' work in this lesson. 
  • At the end of the lesson, collect students' most recent informative piece drafts, with their revisions from Lesson 10 and edits from this lesson. Students publish their informative pieces in Unit 3, Lesson 2. Read students' work and provide feedback between now and then.
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist during students' small group discussions in Work Time C. See the Tools page.
  • Consider using the Writing Informal Assessment: Writing and Language Skills Checklist (Grade 4) during students' editing in Work Time C. See the Tools page.
  • Collect in response to informative Quickwrite homework (Lesson 10).

Down the road:

  • In the next lesson, students will complete the End of Unit 2 Assessment, in which they plan, draft, revise, and edit an informative piece about the pufferfish.
  • Students will refer to the conventions anchor charts introduced in this lesson again in Unit 3 when editing their choose-your-own-adventure narratives.

In Advance

  • Prepare a research reading share using with the Independent Reading: Sample Plan document, or using your own independent reading routine.
  • Prepare the Parts of Speech anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • Set up editing stations. Ideally these stations will have enough room for about a third of the class, with all stations having the appropriate colored pencils, a surface to write on (table/desks or clipboard), and a clear view of the Spelling Conventions, Capitalization Conventions, and Punctuation Conventions anchor charts.
  • Review the millipede informative piece draft and make changes as necessary.
  • Post: Spelling Conventions, Capitalization Conventions, and Punctuation Conventions anchor charts; learning targets.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Conjunction and Compound Sentences videos: There are a number of free videos on YouTube and Vimeo about combining simple sentences into compound sentences using coordinating conjunctions. Perform a video search for "using coordinating conjunctions" in a search engine. Carefully preview the video to ensure that it is age-appropriate and meets the criteria of the lesson. Be aware that many free online videos contain advertisements that may not be suitable for children.
  • Work Time A: 'Identify Coordinating Conjunctions.' IXL Learning. Web. 9 Apr, 2015. .
  • Work Time A: 'Use Coordinating Conjunctions.' IXL Learning. Web. 9 Apr, 2015.
  • Work Time C: If students are creating their writing on a shared doc such as a Google Doc, ask them to color code the revisions they make.
  • Work Time C: Students complete their revisions in a word processing document, for example a Google Doc using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software like Dictation.io. 
  • Students fill out a Google Form or write on a class Google Doc or Google Spreadsheet. 
  • Audio exit tickets: Students record their ideas in audio through free software or apps such as Voki, Audacity, or Garageband.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.A.4, 4.I.C.10, 4.II.C.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by alluding to the English clause system and through explicit instruction as to how coordinating conjunctions can connect related clauses.
  • ELLs may find using coordinating conjunctions challenging. They need to know when words such as and are used as coordinating conjunctions to connect two independent clauses. Therefore, they have to know what an independent clause is, which means they also need to remember how to identify a subject with a predicate. Be explicit about these grammar terms (or use equivalent terms, such as "complete thought" for "independent clause"). This information may be new and possibly overwhelming for students. Reassure them and encourage them simply to do their best, emphasizing that learning these terms and concepts will help them become clear writers over time.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Not all languages require a subject and a predicate to form an independent clause. However, nearly all languages use coordinating conjunctions to connect ideas. Use these facts as a departure point for talking with ELLs about English, or invite students to discuss these facts with students who need heavier support in home language groups.
  • Invite students to prepare a FANBOYS glossary to share with students who need heavier support. Include a simple explanation for each coordinating conjunction. Example: 

FOR: because. Use for to connect a fact with a reason. It also relies on a tough external shell for protection.

AND: Use and to connect two similar ideas, or to connect the first thing that happens with what happens next (sequence or result).

For heavier support:

  • Ask students: "Which steps have we finished in the writing process?" (plan, draft, revise) "What steps will we do next?" (edit, publish) 
  • Give students practice identifying independent clauses and their parts. Have them highlight the independent clauses in a paragraph of their complex text. Have them underline the subjects and write "S," underline predicates and write "P," and circle coordinating conjunctions and write "CC." 
  • As students move toward the End of Unit 2 Assessment, emphasize that it is critical for them to raise their hand if they don't understand something. Remind them of sentence frames they can use: "Sorry, but I don't understand. How do I _____?" "Could you say that again slowly?"
  • As students move toward the End of Unit 2 Assessment, remind them that they will be asked to complete tasks that are similar to those in Lessons 7-11. However, the texts and presentation of the tasks can be quite different. As a test-taking strategy, remind them to look for language they have learned in Lessons 7-11 that they can apply to the assessment. For example: common structures in directions such as "use details from the source to support" and "Write an informational piece that describes _____" and common vocabulary such as threaten and poisonous.
  • Prepare ELLs for the End of Unit 2 Assessment by allowing them to read one of their peers' model informative piece drafts about a different expert group animal. Have them highlight the focus statement, the defense mechanisms and concrete details in each proof paragraph, and the concluding statement.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, support learning about the usage of commas before coordinating conjunctions. Support comprehension by pre-teaching with targeted instruction on terms such as subject, verb, independent clause, and simple sentence in order to grasp the concept of a coordinating conjunction.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Support a range of fine motor abilities and writing need by offering students options for writing utensils. Also consider supporting students' expressive skills by offering partial dictation of student responses. Recall that varying tools for construction and composition supports students' ability to express knowledge without barriers to communicating their thinking.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, remind students of the goal for the work they are doing with their writing. Returning to the learning goals lifts up their value and relevance to students.

Vocabulary

Key: (L): Lesson-Specific Vocabulary; (T): Text-Specific Vocabulary; (W): Vocabulary used in writing

  • capitalization, spelling, comma, simple sentence, subject, verb, compound sentence, coordinating conjunction, part of speech, phrase, clause (L)

Materials

  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (from Module 1)
  • Independent Reading: Sample Plan (see the Tools page; for teacher reference)
  • Informative Writing Checklist (from Lesson 7; one per student and one to display)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (from Module 1)
  • Equity sticks
  • Parts of Speech anchor chart (begun in Module 1; added to in advance; see supporting materials)
  • Coordinating Conjunctions handout (one per student and one to display)
  • Coordinating Conjunctions handout (for teacher reference)
  • Spelling Conventions anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time B)
  • Capitalization Conventions anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time B)
  • Punctuation Conventions anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time B)
  • Millipede convention-less paragraph (one to display)
  • Three different colored pencils (one of each color per student)
  • Affix List (from Module 1; one per student and one to display)
  • Informative piece drafts (begun in Lesson 8; one per student)
  • Index cards (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Research Reading Share (5 minutes) 

  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart. Remind students of: I behave with integrity. This means I am honest and do the right thing, even when it's difficult, because it is the right thing to do.
  • Remind them that this includes doing homework even when there may be other things they want to do after school. Remind them that the purpose of research reading is to build background knowledge and vocabulary on a topic so that they can gradually read more and more complex texts on that topic.
  • Refer to the Independent Reading: Sample Plan to guide students through a research reading review, or use your own routine.
  • For ELLs: To provide heavier support, point to the Domain-Specific Word Wall and provide sentence frames to increase their participation. Examples:
    • "I've been research reading _____."
    • "I've learned ____ about the topic."
    • "A new word I learned is _____."
  • Prep students with specific needs for the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol by sharing the questions that will be asked in advance. Consider scribing notes for their answers that they can use during their conversations with peers. (MMAE, MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Display the Informative Writing Checklist and invite students to take out their own copy. Remind them that this checklist will be used to assess their writing. 
  • Invite students to read the following characteristics on the checklist:
    • "L.4.1: My words and sentences follow the rules of writing."
    • "L.4.2, L.4.3b: The spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in my piece is correct."
  • Ask: 

"Why is it important to follow the rules of writing, including using proper spelling, capitalization, and punctuation?" (Following the rules of writing helps our reader better understand our writing.)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and ask them to follow along as you read them aloud:
    • "I can check my peers' work for correct capitalization and spelling.
    • "I can check my peers' work for correct use of a comma before a coordinating conjunction."
  • Tell students that today they will move to the editing stage of the writing process to consider these conventions. Circle the key words: capitalization, spelling, and comma. Clarify the meanings of these words or targets as needed.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart, specifically take responsibility. Remind students that like in the previous lesson when they revised, today they will need to take responsibility for their writing by self-assessing their work and correcting any errors they find as they edit.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Using Commas before Coordinating Conjunctions (10 minutes)

  • Write the following on the board: 
    • They have many body segments. Two pairs of legs are on each segment.
    • They have many body segments, and two pairs of legs are on each segment.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner, and then use equity sticks to call on students to share:

"What is the same between the first and second bullets? What is different?" (The first bullet point has two sentences, and the second bullet point has only one sentence; both bullet points have the same meaning.)

  • Point out that the sentences in the first example are simple sentences--each has a subject and a verb and is a complete thought. If necessary, review the terms subject and verb.
  • Point out that the sentence is the second example is a compound sentence; it is made up of two independent clauses, or two complete sentences, and has a word connecting them.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner, and then use equity sticks to call on students to share:

"Which flows better: the first example or the second example?" (The second one flows better; be aware that students may not know at this stage.)

  • Tell students that writers often think about the flow of their writing. To make sentences sound as if they naturally go together, they might use more compound sentences. To do this, they connect the simple sentences together using something called a coordinating conjunction. Note: Students should be familiar with coordinating conjunctions based on their work in the Additional Language and Literacy block this week. Adjust instruction based on their comfort level with coordinating conjunctions and how they function.
  • Direct students' attention to the Parts of Speech anchor chart and remind them that they used this chart in Module 1. Point out the new row and tell them that conjunctions are a part of speech, or one of the major categories that words are grouped into, according to their function. If necessary, remind students of other parts of speech, such as nouns, verbs, or adjectives.
  • Select a volunteer to read the headings on the anchor chart and to read what a conjunction is:
    • "a word that joins together words, phrases, or clauses"
  • If necessary, remind students that a phrase is a group of words that express a single thought but are not a complete sentence, and a clause is a part of a sentence that has its own subject and verb.
  • Explain that using conjunctions in writing can give it a natural flow or rhythm, and not using them can make the writing sound choppy or disjointed. Tell students that writers often combine two shorter sentences into a longer one by joining them with a conjunction.
  • Display and distribute the Coordinating Conjunctions handout. Ask for volunteers to read it aloud to the whole group, including the simple sentences at the bottom of the page.
  • Point out the acronym FANBOYS in the middle of the chart. This may help students remember the coordinating conjunctions. 
  • Invite students to copy the compound sentence from the board ("They have many body segments, and two pairs of legs are on each segment") into the appropriate spot on their handout.
  • Point out that when you use a coordinating conjunction to connect two independent clauses, the coordinating conjunction has a comma before it.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

"For the compound sentence we just copied onto the handout, what are the independent clauses? What is the coordinating conjunction? What punctuation mark comes before the coordinating conjunction?" (the two independent clauses, the word "and," and a comma)

  • Circle the comma before and and point it out to students. Refer to the Coordinating Conjunctions handout (for teacher reference).
  • If productive, cue students with a challenge, and to expand the conversation by saying more:

"What if we remove the coordinating conjunction? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (We would have a run-on sentence; the writing would sound choppy; we might not understand how the two independent clauses are related.)

"Can you say more about that?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Ask students to repeat with the other simple sentences. Select volunteers to share their responses and justify their answers using the handout. Refer to the Coordinating Conjunctions handout (for teacher reference).
  • Tell students that you want them to make sure they are combining simple sentences into compound sentences using a comma and a coordinating conjunction as they edit their writing.
  • Ask:

"Are there any specific criteria about the rules of writing in this piece that you should be aware of that you want to add to the Informative Writing Checklist to make it more precise?"(I can use a comma before a coordinating conjunction correctly in my writing.)

  • Invite them to write this on their own copies of the checklist.
  • Let the students know that they will have an opportunity to practice working with compound sentences and coordinating conjunctions for homework.
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Highlight language structures that are critical to understanding the millipede sentences. Examples: "They have many body segments. Two pairs of legs / on each segment." Work on comprehension of these structures--for example, by eliciting paraphrases of these structures. Ask questions about their meaning. Examples: "What does segment mean?" (Ask a partner or use a dictionary.) "Point to the body segments in this picture of the millipede. Can you count them?" "What's a pair of legs? Is it like a pair of shoes?"
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with information processing: Tell students as you take and display notes: "In English, a sentence has one or more independent clauses. An independent clause is like a complete thought or idea. An independent clause has to have at least one subject with a verb. A subject is a person, a place, or a thing. A verb is an action--what the person, place, or thing does." (MMR, MMAE)

Label the first sentence on the board with the following terms: Independent Clause, Subject ("They" and "Two pairs of legs"), Verb ("have" and "are").

Ask students to label the second sentence. 

  • For ELLs: Tell students that a comma is a mark that tells us when to take a breath or break in our reading. Read the sentences on the board aloud, exaggerating the breath for the comma. Choral read, telling the students to exaggerate the breath. Label the comma on the board.
  • For ELLs: Distribute a FANBOYS glossary.
  • For ELLs: Repeat and rephrase your questions.
  • For ELLs: Ask students for explicit feedback: "Why are we practicing coordinating conjunctions?" (to help our writing flow better, to help our writing sound nicer)

B. Guided Practice: Editing for Conventions (15 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the three editing stations. Read the Spelling Conventions anchor chart at the first station:
    • "How can I make sure my SPELLING is correct?" 
  • Cold call students to share out responses. Record their responses on the anchor chart. Be sure these are on the chart: 
    • Breaking down words using prefixes and suffixes
    • Checking the vocabulary logs or research texts
    • Thinking about whether the word is a common homophone, which is two or more words that sound the same but mean something different and are spelled differently
  • Repeat this process for the capitalization and punctuation stations, creating a Capitalization Conventions anchor chart and a Punctuation Conventions anchor chart.
  • Be sure to note that students' expert group animal is not a proper noun and should not be capitalized.
  • Tell students they will use these conventions anchor charts later in the lesson.
  • Display the millipede convention-less paragraph. Use the first few sentences of the paragraph to model how to edit for spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. Use a different colored pencil for each convention.
  • Consider using a think-aloud similar to the following:
    • Read aloud the convention-less paragraph. Consider using a think-aloud where you notice a mistake: 

"I know that one of the rules for capitalization is to be sure the first word of each sentence is capitalized." 

    • Demonstrate fixing a mistake. Say: 

"I see that I did not do this when I wrote the first sentence, so I am going to circle it with a colored pencil from this station."

    • Continue modeling and reading aloud the convention-less paragraph. Notice another mistake and think aloud by saying something like: 

"I notice that one hint is to think about whether the word has any common prefixes or suffixes." 

    • Demonstrate fixing the mistake. Say:

"I'm not sure if I spelled the word decaying right in this sentence in the first paragraph: 'They roll into balls and eat leaves or decayin vegetation.' I think it ends with a suffix. I'm going to look at my Affix List and see if there's a suffix on here that I hear in the word decaying. On this handout, I see the suffix -ing! That's how the word decaying ends. I'll circle 'decayin' on my draft with a colored pencil from this station and write -ing above it."

  • Address any clarifying questions.
  • For ELLs: Display a homophone and tell students what it is. Example: no and know.
  • Fore ELLs: Ask: "Who remembers what an affix is?" (a small piece added to the beginning or end of a basic, or root, word) "There are two kinds of affixes. What is an affix added to the beginning of a word?" (prefix) "What is an affix added to the end of a word?" (suffix) "What's an example of a suffix?" (-able, -ing) "What does -able mean?" (can do, able to) "The suffix -ing is different. It just helps us turn the verb decay into the adjective decaying to describe vegetation. What kind of vegetation?" (decaying vegetation)

C. Editing Stations (20 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to rotate through all three editing stations for spelling, capitalization, and punctuation, where they will receive help from peers to improve their informative piece drafts. Give directions: 

1. Count off or choose one station to begin work.

2. Take your informative piece draft with you to your first station.

3. At that station, trade papers with a partner.

4. Read your partner's draft (with revisions for supporting details and vocabulary from Lesson 10) and identify any mistakes related to that station's convention (e.g., capitalization).

5. When both partners are finished, move to the next station.

6. Be sure to visit all three stations.

  • In addition to their informative pieces, remind students to also keep out their independent reading journals.
  • Dismiss students to their first station.
  • Circulate and confer with pairs who may need extra support and to check independent reading journals for completion. Continue checking in on all students' progress by warning them when they have 1 minute left at their current station. Allow about 6 minutes per station. Pairs who finish early can begin revising and typing, if these facilities are available.
  • At the end of the lesson, collect students' most recent informative piece drafts. Explain that you will read these drafts and give students feedback, and they will have a chance to publish their writing in Unit 3.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

"How does our editing process add to your understanding of one another's informative piece drafts? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to record 'Y' for 'Yes' and the date in the final column of their Informative Writing Checklist if they feel the criteria marked on their checklists have been achieved in their writing in this lesson.
  • Focus students on the learning targets. Read each one aloud, pausing after each to use a checking for understanding protocol for students to reflect on their comfort level with or show how close they are to meeting each target. Make note of students who may need additional support with each of the learning targets moving forward.
  • Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they showed integrity and took responsibility in this lesson.
  • For students who may need additional support with self-regulation: Consider several options if students need more structured management of movement. Partners can raise their hands when they are done at a given station and check with you before they move on. Or students can remain in one place and all materials can be available where they are working. (MME)
  • For students who may need additional support with editing: Consider having students complete each round of editing directly after the guided practice for that aspect of the writing. Or consider having students with specific needs focus on just one strategy at each of the editing stations. The other strategies for revision can be addressed after the lesson as part of a re-teaching opportunity. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Prepare copies of the conventions anchor charts and a conventions checklist to support them during editing.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Redirect students' attention to the Informative Writing Checklist and ask for a volunteer to read the 'My words and sentences follow the rules of writing,' and 'The spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in my piece is correct' characteristics aloud.
  • Distribute index cards and ask students to record their name and respond to the following questions:
    • Front: "Did your words and sentences follow the rules of writing? What is your evidence?"
    • Back: "Is the spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in your piece correct'? What is your evidence?"
  • Collect the index cards. Tell students they have learned a lot over the past couple of weeks about researching and writing informational texts by writing an informational piece about their expert group animal. Tell them that in the next lesson, they will be assessed on the focus question listed at the top of their Informational Writing Planning graphic organizer: "How does my expert group animal use its body and behaviors to help it survive?" To do this, they will do an on-demand assessment in which they write another informational piece about animal defense mechanisms for a different animal. 
  • Assure them that they are ready for this "on my own" assessment. They have just finished their informational pieces about their expert group animals and now should be experts on this genre of writing.
  • For students who may need additional support with written expression: Invite students to answer the exit ticket questions as interview questions with the teacher or by highlighting areas of their informative writing that they have revised to show the 10th and 11th characteristics. (MMAE)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Complete Coordinating Conjunctions I in your unit homework resources.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)

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