End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G4:M1:U2:L14

End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.4.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.4.2a: Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • W.4.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • L.4.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.4.1f: Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
  • L.4.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.4.2b: Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can give kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my partner. (W.4.5)
  • I can revise my literary essay for complete sentences and for correct use of commas and quotation marks to mark quotations from the text. (W.4.2a, L.4.1f, L.4.2b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay (W.4.2a, L.4.1f, L.4.2b)
  • Tracking Progress: Informative Writing

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Returning Mid-Unit 2 Assessments (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Peer Critique: Literary Essay (15 minutes)

B. End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Tracking Progress (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students participate in their first peer critique during Work Time A. Consider any additional guidelines to establish for this routine, as the class will return to it throughout the year. Following the peer critique, students revise their literary essays based on peer feedback (W.4.5). Peer feedback is focused on the use of linking words and phrases to connect ideas (W.4.2a); complete sentences; and correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization (L.4.1f, L.4.2).
  • In Opening A, students' Mid-Unit 2 Assessments are returned with feedback. The purpose of this is for students to have the opportunity to see how they performed in order to improve in their next assessment, and to ask questions if they don't understand the feedback.
  • If time permits, consider allowing more time for peer review focused on common issues students may need more support with.
  • After the assessment, students reflect on their learning using Tracking Progress: Informative Writing. This exercise is meant to provide them with time to formally keep track of and reflect on their own learning. Students used a similar form to track their reading progress in the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, so they should be familiar with the layout and the scale, but because this is a new set of criteria, students may need a lot of support completing this form for the first time.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is on working to become an effective learner. The characteristics students are reminded of specifically are perseverance as they work through an assessment independently and taking responsibility as they reflect on their learning about informational writing throughout this unit.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to poetry and what inspires people to write. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • Beginning in Lesson 10, students wrote the first draft of their literary essays. In this lesson, they revise those essays to create a final version for the end of unit assessment.

Areas where students may need additional support:

  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • Some students may need more than the 25 minutes allocated for this assessment.
  • Some students may need additional opportunities to demonstrate understanding of the following language standards: L.4.1f and L.4.2b. Consider assessing student understanding of these standards using End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part II (optional), found in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • Students may find it difficult to complete the Tracking Progress recording form. For those who might be overwhelmed with the form, consider selecting just one or two criteria for them to focus on. For the things they did well, if students will struggle to write this on the form, they could draw a star on a sticky note or evidence flag and place it somewhere on their work where they think they did well. For the things they could improve upon, they could do the same by drawing steps on the sticky note. Another option: Students could copy the standard numbers of the criteria they did well on or need to improve upon in the appropriate space on the form.

Assessment guidance:

  • Writing rubrics can be found in the Grade 4 Writing Rubrics document (see the Tools page). All other assessment materials (student copy, answer key, student exemplar) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • When assessing and providing feedback to students on this assessment, use the teacher answer key and sample student responses (see the Assessment Overview and Resources) to help you complete the student Tracking Progress sheet. It is suggested that you make notes in the appropriate column for each criterion and mark evidence with sticky notes on student work in a different color from that used for student responses. There is also space for you to respond to student comments.
  • In this assessment, students are tracking progress toward anchor standard W.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist during students' peer critique in Work Time A. See the Tools page.

Down the road:

  • In the next unit, students will write poems and prepare a speech explaining what inspired them to write their poems. Their speeches will follow the same format as the essays written in this unit.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Mid-Unit 2 Assessments with feedback from Lesson 4.
    • the End of Unit 2 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Review the Peer Critique and Red Light, Green Light protocols. See Classroom Protocols.
  • Post: Learning targets and Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Students revise their literary essays on a word-processing document--for example, a Google Doc.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.A.4, 4.I.C.1o, 4.I.C.11, and 4.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate their writing skills by revising an essay built on their preparation and practice in previous lessons. They self-assess at the end of the lesson in order to celebrate their successes and chart a course for the future.
  • ELLs may find the End of Unit 2 Assessment challenging, as it may be a leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction. Remind students to consult the anchor charts, note-catchers, and checklists introduced during previous lessons. Encourage all communication from ELLs as successful risk-taking, and congratulate them on the progress they've made learning English. Point out some specific examples.
  • Make sure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. See additional support in the lesson.
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss what was easiest and what was most difficult on the assessment, and why. To facilitate this discussion, prepare a concise rubric of the elements of the assessment, and allow students to rank the difficulty level of these elements on a Likert scale. Example:

It was easy to complete my revisions in the time I had. 1 2 3 4 5

  • In future lessons and for homework, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiples Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students will be asked to review a peer's literary essay. Some students may need additional modeling on how to give peer feedback. Consider preparing some sample paragraphs for a literary essay with some common errors. Model how you may identify those errors with a partner (either a student or co-teacher).
  • Multiples Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Because this is an assessment, students will need to complete the same task independently. Help to minimize barriers to writing by providing students with support for fine motor skills, such as a slanted desk, pencil grip, or word processor. Also, help students reduce distractions with dividers or sound-canceling headphones.
  • Multiples Means of Engagement (MME): Create a supportive and inclusive classroom environment by reminding students that everyone is working toward being a better writer. Be sure to highlight and praise growth and development rather than relative performance.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • initiative (L)

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessments with Feedback (one per student; completed in Lesson 4)
  • Informative Essay Prompt: What Inspires Poets? (from Lesson 6; one per student and one to display)
  • Informative Writing Checklist (from Lesson 9; one per student and one to display)
  • Literary essay drafts (begun in Lesson 10; revised during Work Time B; one per student)
  • Blue and orange highlighters (one of each per pair)
  • Red, yellow, and green objects (one of each per student)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Paper (lined; one piece per student)
  • Tracking Progress folder (from Unit 1, Lesson 12; one per student)
    • Tracking Progress: Informative Writing (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (several per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Returning Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 2 Assessments with Feedback.
  • Invite students to spend a few minutes reading the feedback. If they require teacher support to understand the feedback, encourage them to write their names on the board so you can visit with them in this lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with reading: Reassure them that if they don't understand or cannot read the feedback, they will have an opportunity to review it with you during the lesson. (MME)
  • Build an accepting and supportive by reminding students that everyone is working toward individual goals and that learning is about continued growth and development. (MME)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can give kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my partner."

"I can revise my literary essay based on peer feedback."

"I can recognize and write a complete sentence."

"I can use commas and quotation marks to mark quotations from a text."

  • Invite students to retrieve their Informative Essay Prompt: What Inspires Poets? and review it as necessary.
  • For ELLs: Ask students to recall and describe one way that they worked toward the learning targets in the past five lessons.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Peer Critique: Literary Essay (15 minutes)

  • Display and invite students to retrieve their Informative Writing Checklist. Remind them that this checklist is something they will use a lot in their English Language Arts work.
  • Read aloud each of the following criteria, pausing after each one for students to turn and talk to an elbow partner about what each one means in their own words. Then invite students to mark these criteria on their checklist (using a different color or symbol from the ones they used in the previous lessons):
    • W.4.2a
    • W.4.2a
    • L.4.2, L.4.3b
  • Invite students to take out their literary essay drafts and move into pairs.
  • Distribute blue and orange highlighters.
  • Invite students to label themselves A and B.
  • Post and review the following directions:
  1. Partner B reads essay aloud to A. Partner A listens for places where ideas don't sound connected and where linking words and phrases might help.
  2. Together, discuss and highlight in blue any places where linking words and phrases would improve the flow of the writing and would help to connect ideas within sentences or paragraphs.
  3. Together, discuss and highlight in orange any places where there are incomplete sentences, and where spelling, punctuation, or capitalization is incorrect.
  4. Repeat with partner A reading his or her essay aloud to partner B.
  • Answer clarifying questions.
  • Circulate to support students as they work together to edit work. Emphasize that students are not to make revisions yet because they will be doing this in the next part of the lesson.
  • After 12 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Distribute red, yellow and green objects.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Red Light, Green Light protocol to show how close they feel they are to meeting the first learning target. Remind them that they participated in this protocol in Lesson 12 and review what each color represents as necessary (red = stuck or not ready; yellow = needs support soon; green = ready). Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through the protocol using the first learning target. Scan student responses and make a note of students who may need more support with this moving forward.
  • Before the lesson, create a sample essay. It does not have to be a complete essay but perhaps two paragraphs. Make sure there are some necessary revisions in the sample essay. Model with a partner how to provide feedback after reviewing the directions. Make sure you follow the directions and do think-alouds to make your thought processes explicit. (MMR)
  • Emphasize to students that they are all working to become better writers. Tell them even professional writers ask their peers to edit their work. Make sure to highlight growth over relative performance. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Some students may be more familiar with cultural and academic contexts that do not value a peer review process. Some may feel hesitant to allow a peer to comment on their work. To ensure that the purpose of the peer review is transparent, prompt students with a Conversation Cue: "Can you figure out why we are reviewing our work with peers?" (Answers will vary, but could include: to help us improve our writing; to hear new ideas; to make sure our ideas make sense to the reader; to collaborate)
  • For ELLs: Some students may be unfamiliar with the concept of a checklist. Briefly remind students that we use checklists to make sure we remember everything we must include in our writing. Invite students to think of icons they can use as visual mnemonic devices for each of the three criteria relevant for the peer review. Invite students to draw them directly on their note-catchers.

B. End of Unit 2 Assessment: Revising a Literary Essay (20 minutes)

  • Explain to students that they are now going to revise their literary essays to write a final draft incorporating what they learned about linking words and phrases; complete sentences; and spelling, punctuation, and capitalization during the peer review.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and remind them of perseverance, as they will be working independently on their assessment, which may be challenging.
  • Distribute paper. Explain that because this is an assessment, students are to work independently in silence, unless they are speaking with you about their feedback.
  • Invite students to begin working.
  • Circulate to support students as they write their final draft. Remind students to refer to their Informative Writing Checklist and the Informative Essay Prompt: What Inspires Poets? as they work.
  • After 20 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • Consider offering lined paper where every other line has an X or is highlighted in order to remind students to skip lines. (MMR)
  • For students who may need additional support with writing stamina: Before they begin writing, create a writing goal that is appropriate for the individual student (e.g., two pages). Place a star or a sticker at the goal point so that they can self-monitor their progress as they write. (MME)
  • For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Consider offering supportive tools (e.g., pencil grip, slanted desk, or the use of a word processor). (MMAE)
  • Minimize distractions by offering students supports such as dividers or sound-canceling headphones. (MMAE)
  • Some students may not yet have the stamina to write for 25 minutes. Consider offering breaks at pre-determined time points. Place a timer on students' desks to help them monitor their own time. Provide students reasonable choice around what they do during the break (e.g., get a drink of water, stretch). (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: As you explain, display a "map" of the assessment. Example--

Two steps:

  1. Read the feedback on your essays. Write your name on the board if you need help understanding it.
  2. Revise your essay--rewrite and make the changes suggested in the feedback.
  • For ELLs: Read the assessment directions, questions, AND answer options aloud.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading comprehension: Ensure all students clearly understand all assessment directions. Rephrase directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop students who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracking Progress (15 minutes)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their completion of the End of Unit 2 Assessment (Example: "I noticed a lot of you were using linking words and phrases to connect ideas and to make your writing read better.")
  • Distribute students' Tracking Progress folders and Tracking Progress: Informative Writing recording forms. Remind students that successful learners keep track of and reflect on their own learning. Remind them that they completed a similar form after the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment. Point out that because this progress sheet is about informative writing, the criteria on it are very similar to those on the Informative Writing Checklist.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and remind them of taking responsibility, as they will be taking ownership of their goals by self-assessing and setting new goals based on their work in this unit.
  • Select volunteers to read aloud each criterion for the whole group. After hearing each one read aloud, invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

"What does this criterion mean in your own words?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Read the directions aloud for students and explain the scale and what each number represents. They should score themselves a 3 if they think they have achieved that criteria in their writing, a 4 if they think they have done even more than the criterion asks, 2 if they think they are nearly there but not quite, and 1 if they think they still have a lot of work to do.
  • Focus students on the criteria with an asterisk and explain that they are going to focus only on those criteria today.
  • Distribute sticky notes. Tell students they will use these to identify evidence in their work from the unit of their progress toward each criterion.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What handouts or work can you use to find evidence of your progress?" (Responses will vary, but may include: literary essay drafts or End of Unit 2 Assessments.)

  • Guide students through completing Question 1 of the form.
  • Direct students' attention to Question 2 on the form and select a volunteer to read it aloud for the group:
    • "How have I improved since I last worked on this skill?"
  • Point out that even though they did not formally reflect on this skill in the first half of Unit 2, they were introduced to and practiced it in that part of the unit.
  • Invite students to reflect on their own or with a partner on how they have improved on this skill since the first half of the unit. Select volunteers to share with the group.
  • Invite students to record their thinking in the appropriate spot on the form.
  • Point out the "Teacher Response" part under Question 2 and tell students that after class, you will read each student's reflection and respond with your feedback about his or her progress toward the skill.
  • Direct students' attention to Question 3 and select a volunteer to read it aloud for the group:
    • "How can I improve next time?"
  • Invite students to reflect on their own or with a partner on how they can improve on this skill in the future. Select volunteers to share with the group.
  • Invite students to record their thinking in the appropriate spot on the form.
  • Ask students to place the form in their Tracking Progress folder, and collect students' folders.
  • Invite students to give a thumbs-up, thumbs-down, or thumbs-sideways to indicate how well they persevered and took responsibility in this lesson.
  • Create a supportive and inclusive classroom environment by reminding students that everyone is working toward being a better writer. Be sure to highlight and praise growth and development rather than relative performance. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Self-assessment may be an unfamiliar concept for some students. Tell students that thinking about how well they did will help them do even better next time.
  • For ELLs: Allow students to orally paraphrase the meaning of the Tracking Progress criteria, self-assess, and discuss the evidence with a partner before they begin writing.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)

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