Reading Literary Texts: Pages 46–67 of Love That Dog | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G4:M1:U2:L1

Reading Literary Texts: Pages 46–67 of Love That Dog

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.4.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.4.3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).
  • RL.4.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • L.4.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can describe what happens in pages 46-67 of Love That Dog and how Jack feels about it. (RL.4.1, RL.4.3)
  • I can describe what inspires Jack to write poetry using evidence from his thoughts, words, and actions. (RL.4.1, RL.4.3)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Gist of each page on sticky notes in Love That Dog
  • What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart (RL.4.1, RL.4.3)
  • What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher (RL.4.1, RL.4.3)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud and Determining the Gist: Love That Dog, Pages 46-67 (30 minutes)

B. What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students continue reading the novel Love That Dog. They read a section for the gist and analyze what happened in those pages and how Jack felt about it (RL.4.1, RL.4.3). Students then revisit the section and analyze Jack's writing to infer what inspired him to write poetry in those pages of the book (RL.4.3).
  • In Work Time A, students participate in the Thumb-O-Meter protocol. Consider how familiar students are with this protocol and reallocate class time spent introducing it as necessary.
  • In this unit, the habit of character focus is on working to become effective learners. Throughout the rest of this unit, students will "collect" characteristics of effective learners on a Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart. The characteristic they collect in this lesson is perseverance, because they will be working to finish reading Love That Dog over the next several lessons.
  • Students practice their fluency in this lesson by following along and reading silently as the teacher reads from Love That Dog in Work Time A.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to poetry and what inspires people to write. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In Unit 1, students described events in Love That Dog and how Jack feels about them, and learned about what inspires Jack and the poets he studies to write poetry. Students continue these routines in the first half of this unit.
  • Throughout Unit 1, students were introduced to various total participation techniques (e.g., cold calling, equity sticks, turn and talk, Think-Pair-Share, etc.). When following the directive to "Use a total participation technique, invite responses from the group," use one of these techniques or another familiar technique to encourage all students to participate.
  • Throughout Unit 1, students were introduced to Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. Continue using Goal 1 Conversation Cues in this way, considering suggestions within lessons. Refer to the Unit 1, Lesson 3 Teaching Notes and see the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support rereading the text to determine the gist. Strategically pair students with at least one stronger reader per pair.

Assessment guidance:

  • Listen to student book discussions to identify common issues that can be used as whole group teaching points against the criteria recorded on the Discussion Norms anchor chart.

Down the road:

  • As part of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment in Lesson 4, students will write an informative paragraph about what inspires Jack to write poetry.
  • The Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart is introduced in this unit and referenced both throughout the module and the school year.

In Advance

  • Prepare the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • Review the Thumb-O-Meter protocol. See Classroom Protocols.
  • Post: Learning targets, Module Guiding Questions anchor chart, and What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Students complete note-catchers using word processing software--for example, a Google Doc--using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software such as Dictation.io.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.B.6 and 4.I.B.8

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by engaging students in a discussion about what persevering looks and sounds like, allowing them to use language to describe abstract concepts. Additionally, this lesson builds on the patterns introduced in Unit 1 with the of analysis of Love That Dog using the What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart, and the discussion of what inspires Jack to write poetry.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to read and find the gist of a long portion of text in Love That Dog. During Work Time A, encourage students to persevere as they work with the lengthy portion of text. Remind students that their goal is to understand what the story is mostly about, and that it is okay if there are parts and words that they do not quite understand yet. See the Meeting Students' Needs column for additional supports.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, challenge students to evaluate Jack's language choices in his April 17 entry. Read the entry aloud while students follow along. (Examples: "What is Jack's goal in writing this entry?" "How effective do you think Jack is in persuading Walter Dean Myers to come to his school? What words or phrases in the text make you think so?")
  • Throughout reading for the gist, invite more proficient readers to paraphrase the events in each section in more comprehensible language. See the Meeting Students' Needs column for additional supports for reading the text.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, throughout the reading for gist, stop often to check for comprehension. Ask students to summarize the events and ideas in the text (see Meeting Students' Needs).
  • During Work Time A, provide students with the gist of the first seven journal entries on sticky notes. As partners read and discuss, tell them which sticky notes match the gist represented in the first three journal entries and have them match the gist represented in the next four journal entries. Finally, invite them to write the gist of the last four journal entries on sticky notes.
  • During Work Time B, copy "Love That Boy" and Jack's March 22 journal entry. Display them side by side. Invite students to draw lines to show the similarities between the two. Invite them to use contrasting colors to underline portions that are different.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiples Means of Representation (MMR): Consider multiple means of representation during the read-aloud to help facilitate enhanced comprehension of Love That Dog (e.g., strategically plan think-alouds and Think-Pair-Shares as you read particularly challenging sections of the text.)
  • Multiples Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Copying information directly onto the note-catcher may be a barrier for students to engage in classroom discussion. Consider offering pre-written sticky notes for students to place in the appropriate section of their note-catcher so that they can focus on the discussion rather than on copying text.
  • Multiples Means of Engagement (MME): Some students may not feel comfortable sharing their comfort level with the learning targets publicly. Reduce the risk of this activity by providing a confidential method such as a recording form for students to share their progress and to help inform future instruction.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • inspires, effective learners, persevere, gist (L)

Materials

  • Module Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening A)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Love That Dog (from Unit 1, Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Equity sticks (one set per class)
  • Sticky notes (12 per student)
  • What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 2; added to during Work Time A)
  • What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 10; one per student and one to display)
  • What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Module Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

  • Display the Module Guiding Questions anchor chart and invite students to chorally read each question aloud with you:
    • "What makes a poem a poem?"
    • "What inspires writers to write poetry?"
  • Remind students that in Unit 1, they read and analyzed poems by Jack and the poets Jack studied in Love That Dog to learn about what makes a poem a poem.
  • Point out the word inspires in the second question. Tell students that in this unit, they will focus more on what inspires people to write poetry. Tell them that in the first half of the unit, they will focus on thinking and writing about what inspired Jack to write poetry, and in the second half of the unit they will focus on learning more about what inspired some of the poets Jack studied to write poetry.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart. Point out the part at the top that says effective learners are people who develop the mindsets and skills for success in college, career, and life.
  • Read aloud the habit of character recorded:
    • "I persevere. This means I challenge myself. When something is difficult or demanding, I keep trying and ask for help if I need it."
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

"Using the anchor chart as a guide, what does persevere mean in your own words?" (I keep trying even when things are tough.)

"What does persevering look like? What might you see when someone is persevering?" See Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).

"What does persevering sound like? What might you hear when someone is persevering?" See Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (example, for teacher reference).

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the appropriate column on the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart. Refer to Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Consider inviting students to use their translation dictionary if necessary to determine the translation of persevere in their home language. Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation to silently repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Choral repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.
  • Record effective learners and persevere on the Academic Word Wall. Invite students to add translations of the words in their home languages in a different color next to the target vocabulary.
  • Once again, remind students of the habit of character of focus: persevere.
  • Tell students they will have to persevere as they finish reading Love That Dog.
  • Consider varied methods for students to demonstrate the definition of persevere (e.g., act out an example instead of providing the answer verbally). (MMR, MME)
  • To facilitate increased comprehension of the definition of persevere, provide additional examples. Pick something that all students have access to, such as an example from the classroom or from a class text. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Consider having the students think about the meaning of the word mindset. Ask:

"What two words do you see in mindset?" (mind and set) "What do those words tell us about what mindset might mean?" (Responses will vary.)

If necessary, explain that mindset means "way of thinking" or "attitude." Invite students to share translations of the word in their home languages, or invite them to ask a family member.

  • For ELLs: Check comprehension by asking students to describe any effective learners they know. Ask:

"How do these effective learners persevere?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Oscar is an effective learner because he always asks for help when he doesn't understand something.)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can describe what happens in pages 46-67 of Love That Dog and how Jack feels about it."

"I can describe what inspires Jack to write poetry using evidence from his thoughts, words, and actions."

  • Remind students that in the previous unit they thought about the gist of sections from Love That Dog, they described events from the book and how Jack felt about them, and they described what inspired Jack to write poetry. Tell students they will continue doing that in this unit as they finish reading the book.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What has happened in Love That Dog so far?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Jack has been learning about poetry; Jack has learned what makes a poem a poem; Jack has been writing poems about his dog, Sky; Jack read a poem by Walter Dean Myers that he really liked.)

  • Record the responses linked to major plot points in Love That Dog visually. Consider using a timeline or plot map to help students remember the sequence of events. Or ask more targeted questions (Examples: "Who are the main characters?" "What is the setting?" "What is the problem?") (MMR, MME)
  • For ELLs: Check comprehension of the third learning target by asking and discussing:

"What are examples of Jack's thoughts, words, and actions that show his inspiration so far?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Jack wrote a shape poem about his dog after his teacher read shape poems. He said that his brain was "pop-pop-popping" when he was looking at the shape poems.)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud and Determining the Gist: Love That Dog, Pages 46-67 (30 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out their copy of Love That Dog and turn to page 46.
  • Move students into pre-determined pairs.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read aloud pages 46-67, including the chapter titles and the verse. Read slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner, and use equity sticks to select students to share with the whole group:

"What do you know from this section of the book?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Jack wrote a poem about Sky that was like a poem by Walter Dean Myers; Jack wrote a letter to Walter Dean Myers inviting him to Jack's school.)

  • Tell students now they will think about gist of what they just read.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What does it mean to determine the gist of a text?" (to think about what the text is mostly about)

  • Focus students on pages 46-48 and invite students to chorally read them with you. Invite students to turn and talk with their partner, and use a total participation technique to select students to share with the whole group:

"What is the gist of this section? What is it mostly about?" (Jack's dog, Sky, followed him around everywhere.)

  • Distribute and invite students to record this on sticky notes.
  • Invite students to work with their partner to reread pages 46-67 and to discuss the gist of each journal entry on pages 49-67. Remind students that the gist doesn't have to be written in full sentences. It can be just a few words to explain what the text is mostly about or sketches with labels, as long as they can read and understand what they have recorded.
  • Circulate to support students in rereading and finding the gist.
  • After 10 minutes, refocus whole group and use equity sticks to select students to share the gist of each journal entry. Listen for:
    • Page 49: Jack tells his teacher she can type up one of his poems about Sky, but not his secret one.
    • Pages 50-52: Jack thanks his teacher for typing up his poems and asks questions about Walter Dean Myers.
    • Page 53: Jack tells his teacher no about something, and that she should do whatever she suggested instead.
    • Page 54: Jack thinks Walter Dean Myers wouldn't want to hear from a boy and would rather hear from a teacher.
    • Pages 55-59: Jack writes a letter to Walter Dean Myers about his poetry and inviting him to Jack's school.
    • Page 60: Jack asks his teacher if she mailed his letter yet.
    • Pages 61-63: Jack is surprised it would take so long for Walter Dean Myers to respond and comes up with reasons why he wouldn't write back.
    • Page 64: Jack writes about how hard it is trying not to think about something.
    • Page 65: Jack tells his teacher she can type another one of his poems.
    • Page 66: Jack asks his teacher if he can type his own poems.
    •  Page 67: Jack writes about typing his poems up on the computer.
  • Focus students on the What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner about the following questions, and use equity sticks to select students to share with the whole group. As students share out, capture their responses on the What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart. Refer to What Happens and How Does Jack Feel about It? anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.

"What happens in this section?" (Jack writes a letter to Walter Dean Myers and is waiting for a response back.)

"How does Jack feel about it? What can you infer from what he says?" (He wants Walter Dean Myers to write back and is worried that Walter Dean Myers won't respond.)

"How do you know?" (He writes, "...and maybe he's away maybe he's on vacation maybe he's sick maybe he's hiding in a room writing poems" and writes, "Sometimes when you are trying not to think about something it keeps popping back into your head.")

  • If productive, cue students to clarify the conversation by confirming what they mean:

"So, do you mean _____?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students they are now going to use the Thumb-O-Meter protocol to reflect on their progress toward the first learning target. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review as necessary. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through the Thumb-O-Meter protocol using the first learning target. Note students showing a thumb-sideways or thumb-down, so you can check in with them.
  • To increase comprehension, stop at strategic points in the text and either do a think-aloud or have students do a Think-Pair-Share to highlight key points in the text or work through challenging comprehension points. (MMR)
  • Some students may need additional support inferring Jack's feelings based on the text. Consider scaffolding your questioning by starting with more targeted questions (Examples: "What is Jack doing/thinking/saying on this page?" "What would this look like if you acted it out?" "How do you think Jack felt based on his actions?")
  • Some students may not feel comfortable sharing their comfort level with the learning targets publicly. Reduce the risk of this activity by providing a confidential method such as a recording form for students to share their progress and to help inform future instruction. (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Ask students about the meaning of the chunks of a key sentence from the text. Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Example:
    • "Place your finger on the sentence from Jack's April 17 entry that begins with: So what I'm asking you is this:..." Read the sentence aloud as students follow along.
    • "What is the gist of this sentence?" (Jack invites Walter Dean Myers to his school.)
    • "Place your finger on: So what I am asking you is this:. What does the colon after this tell us?" (The colon tells us that Jack is about to ask his question.)
    • "Place your finger on this part of the sentence: would you ever maybe think about maybe coming maybe to our school. Why do you think Jack includes the adverb maybe so many times?" Tell students you will give them time to think and discuss with their partner. (Jack uses maybe to signal that he knows it may not be possible for Walter Dean Myers to visit his school.)
    • "Place your finger on this part of the sentence: which is a clean place with mostly nice people in it and I think our teacher Miss Sketchberry would maybe even make brownies for you because she sometimes makes them for us. What is Jack trying to communicate in this part of the text?" (He is giving all the reasons he thinks Walter Dean Myers might like to visit.)
    • "Place your finger on the word which. What is which referring to?" (Jack's school) Point out that we can use the word which to refer to the noun in the sentence without having to repeat the noun.

B. What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? (10 minutes)

  • Display and invite students to take out the What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher.
  • Invite students to turn back to pages 46-48 of Love That Dog and read aloud Jack's poem "Sky."
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner, and cold call students to share with the whole group:

"What inspired Jack to write this poem?" (reading "Love That Boy" by Walter Dean Myers and his dog, Sky)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the "What inspired the poet?" column and invite students to do the same on their copies. Refer to What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner, and cold call students to share with the whole group:

"Where can you see evidence of this in the poem?" (Jack's poem ends with "Hey there, Sky!" which is similar to a line from "Love That Boy"--"Hey there, son!"--and his poem is about his dog.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the "Where can you see evidence of this in the poem?" column and invite students to do the same. Refer to What Inspires Poets to Write Poetry? note-catcher (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Offer choice by providing a note-catcher that includes lines. (MMR, MME)
  • Some students may need additional support with writing/copying from the note-catcher. Consider other options such as providing pre-recorded sticky notes that students can place in the appropriate box or having multiple choice options in the boxes that students can circle. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Invite the students to analyze the effect of the adverbial phrases (-ing verb phrases) that Jack uses to describe nouns and verbs in his poem (e.g., wagging his tail, coming out of his mouth, jumping up on me, kicking the ball, getting slobber all over the ball.) Point to and read aloud each of these phrases while the students follow along. Ask: "What is the effect of these phrases on your understanding of the poem?" (They help me picture in my mind what is happening in the poem; they emphasize the action in the poem.)
  • For ELLs: In preparation for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment in Lesson 4, allow students to practice describing Jack's poems. To provide lighter support, invite intermediate students to create sentence frames. Invite students who need heavier support to use the frames. Examples:
    • "Jack wrote a poem about ___."
    • "It's the story of ___."
    • "The poem tells how ___."

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Refocus students on the second learning target. Tell them they are going to use the Thumb-O-Meter protocol again to show how close they feel they are to meeting the learning target now. Remind them that they used this protocol earlier in the lesson and review as necessary. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Guide students through the protocol. Scan student responses and make a note of students who may need more support with this moving forward. Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they persevered in this lesson.
  • Some students may not feel comfortable sharing their comfort level with the learning targets publicly. Reduce the risk of this activity by providing a confidential method such as a recording form for students to share their progress and to help inform future instruction. (MME, MMAE)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: For all homework assignments in this unit, read the prompts aloud. Students can discuss and respond to prompts orally, either with you, a partner, family member, or student from Grades 1 or 2, or record an audio response. If students have trouble writing sentences, they can begin by writing words. Consider providing a sentence starter or inviting students who need lighter support to provide sentence starters.

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