End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack’s Character | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G4:M1:U1:L12

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack’s Character

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.4.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.4.3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).
  • RL.4.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • W.4.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • W.4.9a: Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions].").
  • SL.4.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • SL.4.1a: Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
  • SL.4.1b: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
  • SL.4.1c: Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can describe how Jack's feelings about poetry changed using evidence from the text. (RL.4.1, RL.4.3, RL.4.10, W.4.9a, SL.4.1a, SL.4.1b, SL.4.1c)
  • I can follow discussion norms to have an effective text-based discussion. (SL.4.1a, SL.4.1b, SL.4.1c)

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack's Character (RL.4.1, RL.4.3, RL.4.10, W.4.9a, SL.4.1a, SL.4.1b, SL.4.1c)
  • Tracking Progress: Collaborative Discussion (SL.4.1)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack's Character (40 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Tracking Progress (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students complete the end of unit assessment in which they complete two tasks: 1) having a group discussion about how and why Jack's feelings about poetry have changed (RL.4.1, RL.4.3, W.4.9a, SL.4.1a, SL.4.1b, SL.4.1c), and 2) answering short response questions about how and why Jack's feelings about poetry have changed (RL.4.1, RL.4.3).
  • The purpose of the second part of the assessment is to ensure that students are independently able to answer questions about the changes to Jack's character, because they worked as a class and in pairs when preparing for the discussion in the previous lesson and because some students may not be able to articulate themselves well enough orally to demonstrate mastery of the RL standards.
  • In order to hear all students discuss, create groups of five and provide 5 minutes for each group's discussion. When students are not involved in the discussions, they should complete Part II of the assessment independently.
  • After the end of unit assessment, students reflect on their learning using the Tracking Progress: Collaborative Discussion recording form. This exercise is meant to provide them with time to formally keep track of and reflect on their own learning. This self-reflection supports metacognition and pride in work and learning.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is on working to become an ethical person. The characteristic that students practice is integrity, as they work independently on assessments.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework will help build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to poetry and creative writing. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.

How it builds on previous work:

  • In the previous lesson, students prepared for this assessment by completing the Preparing for a Text-Based Discussion note-catcher with evidence to explain how and why Jack's feelings about poetry changed.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • Some students may require longer than the time allocated to complete the assessment.

Assessment guidance:

  • Assessment materials (student copy, answer key, student exemplar, teacher checklist) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • When assessing and providing feedback to students on this assessment, use the teacher answer key and sample student responses (see Assessment Overview and Resources) to help you complete the student Tracking Progress recording form. Consider making notes in the appropriate column for each criterion and marking evidence with flags/sticky notes on student work in a different color from that used for student responses. There is also space provided to respond to student comments.
  • In this assessment, students are tracking progress toward anchor standard SL.1: Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing my own clearly and persuasively.
  • Collect Affixes Practice I homework from Lesson 10.

Down the road:

  • In Unit 2, students continue to read Love That Dog and consider what inspired Jack to write poetry. They then read biographies of the famous poets from Love That Dog to determine what inspired them to write poetry.

In Advance

  • Prepare the End of Unit 1 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Determine student groups (of five) for the text-based assessment, as well as the order in which groups will discuss, and post this information.
  • Gather Tracking Progress folders.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students complete assessments online on a Google Form, for example.
  • Work Time A: Students complete assessments in a word-processing document--for example, a Google Doc--using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software such as Dictation.io.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 4.I.A.1, 4.I.A.3, 4.I.B.5, 4.I.B.6, 4.I.B.8, and 4.I.C.11

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate their content and language knowledge in a text-based discussion built on their preparation and practice in previous lessons. They self-assess at the end of the lesson in order to celebrate their successes and chart a course for the future.
  • ELLs may find the End of Unit 1 Assessment challenging, in particular the text-based discussion, as it may be a leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction. Remind students to consult the anchor charts, note-catchers, and discussion frames they helped develop during previous lessons. Encourage all communication from ELLs as successful risk-taking, and congratulate them on the progress they've made learning English. Point out some specific examples.
  • Make sure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves (see Meeting Students' Needs column).
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss what was easiest and what was most difficult on the assessment, and why. To facilitate this discussion, prepare a concise rubric of the elements of the assessment, and allow students to rank the difficulty level of these elements on a Likert scale. Example:

The selected response questions were easy to answer. 1 2 3 4 5

In future lessons and for homework, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): To get the most informative data from the assessment, ensure that all students have access to the assessment directions and feel comfortable with the expectations. Vary the ways in which you convey your expectations (e.g., engage in a clarifying discussion about the directions or create a map of the assessment to preview the tasks on the assessment).
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): If students have been using supports during the text-based discussion in this unit, consider allowing them to access these during the discussion. For instance, encourage students to use sentence frames or word banks from the previous lesson or encourage them to participate with nonverbal hand signals in addition to speaking.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Assessments can be overwhelming to some students. Supply them with tools to support self-monitoring during the assessment (e.g., checklists or visual timers for each portion of the assessment). Also, provide tools that minimize distractions during the assessment, such as sound-canceling headphones or dividers.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • Do not preview vocabulary for this assessment lesson.

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack's Character (one per student; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Exit Ticket: Goals for a Text-Based Discussion (from Lesson 11; one per student)
  • Tracking Progress folders (from Lesson 8; one per student)
  • Tracking Progress: Collaborative Discussion (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and select a volunteer to read them aloud:

"I can describe how Jack's feelings about poetry changed using evidence from the text."

"I can follow discussion norms to have an effective text-based discussion."

  • Remind students that they have seen both of these targets before. Tell them that today they will practice these learning targets in an assessment.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with memory: Ask them to recall and describe one way that they worked toward the learning targets in the past three lessons. (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack's Character (40 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Changes in Jack's Character.
  • Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads while you read aloud the directions for each part of the assessment. Answer clarifying questions.
  • Tell students that while they are waiting to participate in the discussion, they should complete Part II of the assessment independently and without talking. Remind them that this is an assessment.
  • Focus students on the Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart, specifically on integrity. Review what integrity looks like and sounds like.
  • Focus students on the Discussion Norms anchor chart, specifically on the cues and responses. Remind students that a discussion is not just about saying what they want to say and then they are done. Effective participation is about listening to others and asking and answering questions to be completely clear about what others are saying, and to clarify their own points.
  • Remind students to refer to the Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart when answering selected response questions.
  • Distribute students' Exit Ticket: Goals for a Text-Based Discussion from the previous lesson and give them 30 seconds to review the criterion they specifically wanted to work on and the strategy they had in mind.
  • One by one, call out groups to work with you in a discussion area away from other students so as not to disrupt them from working on Part II of the assessment. Allocate each group 5 minutes for discussion.
  • Invite the remaining students to begin working on Part II of the assessment.

* For ELLs and students who may need additional support with executive function skills: As you explain, display a "map" of the assessment. (MMR) Example--

Two parts:

1. Collaborative discussion with small group.

A. How have Jack's feelings changed? Why?

2. Answer selected response and short answer questions.

* For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Read the assessment directions, questions, and possible answers aloud. Ensure that they are clear about all directions. Rephrase the directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop students who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions. (MMR)

* Allow students who have been using sentence frames throughout this unit to reference them during the discussion portion of the assessment. (MMAE)

* If students have been using nonverbal hand signals in addition to speaking, allow them to use them during the discussion portion of the assessment. (MMAE)

* Minimize distractions during the assessment by providing tools such as sound-canceling headphones or individual dividers. (MME)

* For students who may need additional support with fine motor skills: Consider offering supportive tools (e.g., pencil grip, slanted desk, or use of a word processor. (MMAE)

* For students who may need additional support in building writing stamina: Consider offering built-in breaks, where students can choose an activity such as getting water or stretching. Reduce the number of these breaks over time as students increase their stamina. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracking Progress (15 minutes)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their completion of the End of Unit 1 Assessment. (Example: "A lot of you were asking each other questions to clarify your understanding or to find out more.")
  • Distribute Tracking Progress folders and Tracking Progress: Collaborative Discussion. Tell students that successful learners keep track of and reflect on their own learning and that they will be completing a form like this after most of their assessments.
  • Tell students the sticky notes are for them to find evidence of the following criteria:
    • SL.4.1a
    • SL.4.1b
  • Guide students through completing the form. Where students have not worked on a standard listed on the chart (for example SL.4.1d), suggest they record "N/A."

Invite students to give a thumbs-up, thumbs-down, or thumbs-sideways to indicate how well they showed integrity in this lesson

  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all students, but research shows it helps those needing additional support the most. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: Allow students to orally paraphrase the meaning of the Tracking Progress criteria, self-assess, and discuss the evidence with a partner before they begin writing. (MMAE)
  • When completing the teacher response on the Tracking Progress recording form, provide feedback that emphasizes individual effort, improvement, and achieving a standard rather than performance relative to other students. (MME)

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt and respond in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE, MMR)

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