Performance Task: Freaky Frog Trading Card | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G3:M2:U3:L11

Performance Task: Freaky Frog Trading Card

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.3.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.3.4: With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
  • W.3.6: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • W.3.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
  • W.3.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • SL.3.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • L.3.6: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can draw a scientific diagram of my freaky frog. (W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.10)
  • I can identify the most important facts about my freaky frog from my research to include in bullet points on a trading card. (W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.8, W.3.10, L.3.6)
  • With peers, I can generate a scoring system for freaky frogs to be used on trading cards. (SL.3.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Trading Card Planning graphic organizer (W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.6, W.3.8, W.3.10, L.3.6)
  • Scientific diagram on trading card (W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.6, W.3.8, W.3.10, L.3.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Planning a Scientific Diagram (15 minutes)

B. Planning Key Facts (15 minutes)

C. Planning Scoring System (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Select one or more of the Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences practices in your Homework Resources to complete.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students plan their Freaky Frog trading cards and draw the scientific diagram on their trading cards. They use information gathered during research to draft bullet points of key information about their frog (W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.6, W.3.8, W.3.10, and L.3.6). As a class, they come up with a scoring system for their trading cards and then score their frog accordingly.
  • Although students may have used a word-processing program for their Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog, they do not have to use technology to create the trading card. See technology options under Technology and Multimedia.
  • The research reading that students complete for homework helps them to build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to frogs and specifically frog adaptations. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.
  • Students who finish quickly or require an extension can create a trading card about a different frog from Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.

How it builds on previous work:

  • The bullet points students generate for their trading cards are a synthesis of their research and learning about their freaky frog.
  • Continue to use Goals 1-3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas where students may need additional support:

  • Students may require additional support in recognizing the difference between a picture and a scientific diagram and drawing a scientific diagram.
  • Students may also require additional support when choosing the most important facts to use as bullet points on their trading cards.

Assessment Guidance:

  • Check students’ Trading Card Planning graphic organizers to see that they are moving in the right direction.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 12, students will finish their trading cards and compile their Freaky Frog books.

In Advance

  • Prepare Model Trading Card (see Performance Task Overview).
  • Prepare student trading cards. Print template on cardstock.
  • Prepare Trading Card Criteria anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • Prepare cardstock for the trading card (4 ¼ x 5 ¾).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students could draw their scientific diagrams with an online drawing tool such as Sketchpad.
  • Work Times B and C: Students could use an online trading card creator to create their trading cards—for example, ReadWriteThink .

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.B.8, 3.I.C.12, 3.II.B.4, 3.II.B.5, 3.II.C.6, 3.II.C.7.

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to demonstrate the growth of their language and content knowledge over the module in an alternative format: the trading card. Adapting their language choices to various contexts will help learners find appropriate, varied ways to expressing similar ideas, thus expanding their knowledge of language structures.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to keep up with the rapid pace of this lesson, and each stage depends on the completion of the previous stage. Consider giving some students more time to complete their cards during Work Time C. Consider allowing students who need extra support to work with partners throughout the lesson, preferably ones with higher language proficiency and experience playing similar card games. Remind students that some may work faster than others and that is okay as long as everybody is trying his or her best.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • To foster learning through diversity and inclusion, provide context and schema for the card game by pointing out that popular card games from Japan are the inspiration for the Freaky Frog game. Emphasize this as an example of the amazing things that we can learn from other cultures. If practical, display some examples of these card games and of other games from different cultures. Example: Chess was invented in India. Go was invented in China.

For heavier support:

  • To illustrate the concept of a scientific diagram, display various examples of diagrams and identify key elements such as labels and technical information.
  • Make sure students know they can use all of the resources available to help them create their trading cards. Examples: Vocabulary Logs, anchor charts, informative essays.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation(MMR): Recall that some students may benefit from visual representation of the discussion questions. Consider providing these questions on display for student view during discussion.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): It may benefit students to look at examples of bullet points about other animals in various informational texts before writing their own about their freaky frogs. Because these bullet points are a synthesis of their research and learning about their freaky frog, students who need support synthesizing their learning may need conferencing or modeling in advance of the lesson.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): For students who lack artistic confidence, consider inviting adults with artistic expertise (art teacher, local artists, publishing experts, etc.) to support these them as they create their Freaky Frog trading card.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • scientific diagram (L)

Materials

  • Performance Task anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Model Trading Card (one to display; see Performance Task Overview)
  • Trading Card Criteria anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Trading Card Planning graphic organizer (one per student)
  • Cardstock (one per student; 4 ¼ x 5 ¾)
  • Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Freaky Frog research notebook (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; one per student and one to display)
  • Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures (book; one per student)
  • Freaky frog texts: “All about the Water-Holding Frog,” “The Amazon Horned Frog,” or “Transparent Wonder” (from Lesson 1; one per student for his or her specific frog group)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Focus students on the learning targets. Select a volunteer to read the first learning target aloud:

“I can draw a scientific diagram of my freaky frog.”

  • Focus students on the words scientific diagram by underlining them. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and cold call students to share out:

“What is a diagram?” (a simple drawing that provides information)

“How is a diagram different from a picture?” (It isn’t as detailed. It shows the information the creator wants the reader to understand.)

“What root word do you see in the word scientific?” (science)

“What do you think a scientific diagram is?” (a diagram that represents scientific facts)

  • Explain that students will learn how to draw scientific diagrams of their freaky frogs.
  • Select a volunteer to read the second learning target aloud:

“I can identify the most important facts about my freaky frog from my research to include in bullet points on a trading card.”

  • Underline the words most important.
  • If productive, cue students with a challenge. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and select volunteers to share out:

“What if we remove the word most from this sentence? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (It would change the meaning of the sentence. It would mean you aren’t just interested in information, but the very best information.)

  • Select a volunteer to read the final learning target aloud:

“With peers, I can generate a scoring system for freaky frogs to be used on trading cards.”

  • Explain that students are going to play a game with the trading cards they create, and the game requires the cards to have a scoring system for each frog.
  • Focus students on the Performance Task anchor chart to review the requirements of the trading card. Select a student to read aloud the criteria for the trading card.
  • For students who may need additional support understanding the terms in the learning targets: Write synonyms or descriptions above these key terms. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Practice the pronunciation of scientific. Clap the syllables, stressing the third syllable: sci-en-TI-fic.
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of the chunks of the learning target: “I can identify the most important facts about my freaky frog from my research to include in bullet points on a trading card.”Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:
    • “What does identify mean? What is identify in our home languages?” (find; point out; show; nhận định in Vietnamese)
    • “One way to tell whether a fact is important is if it helps you understand how your frog is special. I’m going to tell you some facts about the poison dart frog, and I want you to tell me whether each one is important.” Examples:
    • “It sleeps on branches.” (not important)
    • “It is brightly colored.” (important)
    • “What does the word about tell us?” (the topic of the facts)
    • “What does the word from tell us?” (where we will find the facts)
    • “Where are we including, or adding, these important facts? How do you know?” (in bullet points; it says it next in the sentence)
    • “Where are the bullet points?” (on our trading cards)
  • For ELLs: Clarify the meaning of scoring system. Example: “We are going to play a game, like soccer (fútbol), cricket, Monopoly, or cards. Games need rules to tell who wins and who gets points. Those rules are called scoring systems. We’re going to play a game with our Freaky Frog cards, so we need a scoring system.”

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Planning a Scientific Diagram (15 minutes)

  • Display the front of the Model Trading Card (with the scientific diagram and key facts).
  • Cover the key facts and select students to read the labels aloud for the whole group.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner what they notice about the scientific diagram.
  • Cold call students to share out and record their responses on the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart in the Scientific Diagram quadrant. Listen for students to notice:
    • Very simple line drawing with labels
    • Unique adaptations labeled
    • Labels are key words, not sentences.
    • A ruler has been used to draw straight lines from the label to the part of the frog.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner what they wonder about the scientific diagram.
  • Select volunteers to share out. Answer questions and clarify misconceptions.
  • Explain to students that although the model has been drawn from above the frog, they may choose to draw their freaky frog from the side, depending on what unique adaptations it has. It is important that the unique adaptations are visible on the diagram. Add to the anchor chart: “Frog has been drawn to clearly show adaptations.”
  • Distribute the Trading Card Planning graphic organizer.
  • Point out the Scientific Diagram section and explain that students are going to begin by planning their scientific diagram using the criteria on the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart.
  • Invite students to begin and circulate to support them.
  • Students who finish planning can begin their final draft on cardstock.
  • For students who need artistic support: Consider providing photographs and/or tracing paper for students to draw from and practice on before drawing their own scientific diagram. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Display the Model Trading Card on a document camera or create an enlarged version so that each component is clearly visible.
  • For ELLs: Think aloud a “wonder” to prompt students to think of their own wonders. Example: “I wonder why the author chose these adaptations to write on the trading card.”
  • For ELLs: Model referring to research, Vocabulary Logs, and anchor charts to complete the Trading Card Planning graphic organizer. Have an ELL who need lighter support to participate in completing the model graphic organizer. Model using the graphic organizer to add information to the diagram.

B. Planning Key Facts (15 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group. Focus students on the displayed Model Trading Card. Uncover the key facts and select volunteers to read them aloud.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner what they notice about the key facts. Cold call students to share out and record their responses in the Key Facts quadrant of the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart. Ensure that the following are recorded:
    • No more than five facts
    • Tell you where in the world the frog lives and its habitat, and the unique adaptations and behaviors the frog has for survival
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner what they wonder about the key facts.
  • Select volunteers to share out. Clarify as necessary. If productive, cue students with a challenge and cold call them to share out:

“Can you figure out why the designer chose those facts as the most important? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (The trading card is about unique adaptations and where in the world it lives, and the habitat may determine why the frog has those adaptations. For example, a frog that lives in a place without much water may need to be able to store water.)

  • Focus students on the Key Facts section of their Trading Card Planning graphic organizer.
  • Remind students of the different places they can find the key facts they need: their Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog, Freaky Frog research notebook, Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures, and their freaky frog texts.
  • Invite students to begin planning their key facts on their organizer. Circulate to support them in finding the information they need and choosing the most important facts.
  • Students who finish planning can begin/continue their final draft on cardstock.
  • For students who may need additional support planning for writing: Consider providing frames or categories for each key fact (“Lives in ______,” “Has (physical adaptation),” “Will (behavioral adaptation) when threatened,” etc.). (MMAE)
  • For students who may need additional support with information processing: Flag or underline key facts to consider using as key facts on their Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog, research notebooks, and other texts in advance. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Explain that key means important. Example: “A key is something that unlocks a door. When information is important, we can compare it to a key because it helps us ‘unlock’ the meaning of something so that we can understand it.”
  • For ELLs: It can help students to speak about their key facts before writing. Prompt students to share one key fact that they will include on their trading card. Consider using the sentence frame: “One key fact about my freaky frog is _______.”

C. Planning Scoring System (20 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Turn the displayed Model Trading Card over and invite students to discuss with an elbow partner what they notice.
  • Cold call students to share out and record their responses on the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart. Listen for students to notice that:
    • Scoring: Scores frogs on four key features linked to survival.
    • Scoring: Gives frogs a score from 0–5, with 5 being the top score.
    • Scoring Justification: Each score is justified with key words in parentheses.
  • Tell students that, as a class, they will generate a scoring system for their Freaky Frog trading cards that everyone in the class will use so that they can play a trading card game. To foster diversity and inclusion, consider asking students about the inspiration for this game and scoring system. (It comes from similar popular games begun in Japan.)
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner and cold call students to share out:

“Which features could you score all of the freaky frogs on?” (Answers may vary.)

  • Record the suggestions in the Scoring quadrant of the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart. Students may choose those already listed on the Model Trading Card, but they may have other ideas for physical or behavioral adaptations too. Try to encourage students to consider features relevant to all frogs. For example, the size of horns is very specific to only one type of frog and is difficult to score. Ensure that the features students choose have been present in all research texts for all frogs.
  • Invite students to vote on the four features they would like to see on their trading cards. Cross out the others.
  • Invite students to suggest a scoring system for their trading cards. The model is a 0–5, but other options could include 0–3, 0–10, or multiples of 2 or 5.
  • Record the chosen system on the Trading Card Criteria anchor chart.
  • Ensure that all students are clear on the scoring system. Emphasize that all students need to use the same scoring system if they want to play the trading card game in Lesson 12.
  • Invite students to begin planning the scores for their freaky frogs on their organizer. Circulate to support students in scoring their freaky frog features and also in determining key words to justify the scores they give.
  • Students who finish planning can begin/continue their final draft on cardstock.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How does creating the Freaky Frog Trading Card and Scoring System add to your understanding of physical and behavioral adaptations? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Focus students on the learning targets. Read each one aloud, pausing after each to use a checking for understanding protocol for students to reflect on their comfort level with or show how close they are to meeting each target. Make note of students who may need additional support with each of the learning targets moving forward.
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Some students may need more modeling of scoring justification. Pair them with students who clearly understand the scoring system and provide examples. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Students who are more familiar with similar card games may be more eager and prepared to participate in the scoring conversation. Point out that card game rules can sometimes take time to learn, but not to worry because it will be easier to understand once the class begins playing the game. For this conversation, consider pairing students who are unfamiliar with similar games with those who are more familiar. Invite students familiar with games to periodically rephrase the rules for their partners or for the whole class.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with sustained effort: Some students may not be completely clear on the scoring system. Reassure them that it is okay if they do not completely understand. When playing the game, plan to pair students who are confident with the system with those who may still have some confusion. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to pair up with someone working on the same freaky frog to compare their diagrams, key facts, and scores.
  • Ask students to revise their plans where necessary based on their partner share.
  • For ELLs: Pair students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames, for example.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs

A. Select one or more of the Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences practices in your Homework resources to complete.

B. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

  • For ELLs: Give students examples of simple, compound, and complex sentences to assist them as they complete the homework.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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