Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Drafting a Conclusion and Revising Opinion Piece | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G2:M4:U2:L10

Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Drafting a Conclusion and Revising Opinion Piece

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson: 

  • RI 2.2: Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • RI.2.8: Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
  • W.2.1: Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section
  • W.2.5: With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • W.2.7: Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • W.2.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • L.2.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.2.2a: Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
  • L.2.2d: Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage - badge; boy - boil).
  • L.2.5: Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings
  • L.2.5b: Distinguish shades of meaning among closely related verbs (e.g., toss, throw, hurl) and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin, slender, skinny, scrawny).

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can write a conclusion for my opinion piece for why people should protect butterflies. (RI.2.8, W.2.1, W.2.7, W.2.8)
  • I can revise my opinion piece to include linking words and phrases. (W.2.5, L.2.5b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Collect students' opinion pieces and use the Opinion Writing Checklist to track students' progress toward W.2.1, W.2.5, W.2.7, and W.2.8. Also, use the Language Checklist to track students' progress towards L.2.5b (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "The Butterfly Garden" (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part II, Session 4: Drafting a Conclusion (20 minutes)

B. Revising Our Opinion Writing: Adding Linking Words (10 minutes)

C. Revising Our Opinion Writing: Adding Words with Shades of Meaning (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Sharing Our Work: Opinion Writing (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students draft the final part of their opinion piece: the conclusion (RI.2.8, W.2.1, W.2.7, W.2.8). They then revise their writing in Work Times B and C to add linking words and adjectives and verbs with strong meaning. Students work with a partner to orally process ideas before revising their work to support the developmental need of students to plan before they write (W.2.5, L.2.5b).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students use their knowledge of shades of meaning of closely related words (as readers) to revise (as writers) their opinion writing.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • For some students, revising their writing may be a challenge. Consider providing additional modeling of how to add linking words or brainstorm synonyms with strong meanings for adjectives and verbs in their opinion piece.
  • There is not built-in time for students to edit their opinion pieces. For students who need more time to produce correct capitalization and punctuation in their writing, consider providing additional time later in the day.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 11, students will participate in the Collaborative Conversations protocol to synthesize their learning about pollinators in danger and how to help them.

In Advance

  • Pre-distribute Protecting Pollinators research notebooks and My Opinion writing booklets at student workspaces for Work Time A.
  • Post: Learning targets and all applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.
  • During Work Time A, consider providing computers or tablets for students to type their opinion pieces instead of writing them in their My Opinion writing booklet.
  • During Work Times B and C, consider the use of tablets, interactive white boards, and other available technology to project students' writing to model revision.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided by in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.B.6, 2.I.B.7, 2.I.B.8, 2.I.C.10, and 2.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to apply the knowledge of the form and the function of linking words and phrases as they revise their opinion pieces.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to think of stronger verbs and adjectives with similar meanings because they may lack the necessary vocabulary. Encourage students to use words from the Shades of Meaning anchor chart. Empower students to identify verbs and adjectives they would like to strengthen and to brainstorm alternative words with you or a partner.

Levels of support

For lighter support

  • During Work Times A and B, provide students with strips of sticky notes to write linking words and phrases and stronger verbs and adjectives to include in their writing. Students can place the sticky notes in their first drafts as they plan their revisions.

For heavier support

  • During Work Times A and B, provide students with strips of sticky notes with pre-written linking words and phrases and stronger verbs and adjectives to include in their writing. Students can place the sticky notes in their first drafts as they plan their revisions.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support comprehension by activating prior knowledge and scaffold connections for students. Continue to provide visual displays of questions and student responses.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support those who may need support with expressive language by providing sentence frames to help them organize their thoughts.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students who may need additional support with writing may feel uncomfortable sharing their writing with peers and receiving feedback. Create an inclusive and supportive classroom environment by emphasizing that everyone is working toward different writing goals. Place emphasis on growth rather than relative performance.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • conclusion, revise, linking words, shades of meaning (L)

Materials

  • "The Butterfly Garden" (from Lesson 4; one to display)
  • Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats" (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Dangers That Butterflies Face and Reasons Butterflies Are Important: Class Notes (completed in Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Writing Model: "People Should Protect Butterflies" (from Lesson 8; example, for teacher reference)
  • My Opinion writing booklet (from Lesson 8; added to during Work Times A, B, and C; one per student)
  • My Opinion writing booklet (from Lesson 8; example, for teacher reference)
  • Protecting Pollinators research notebook (completed in Lesson 7; one per student)
    • Dangers That Butterflies Face and Reasons Butterflies Are Important: Student Notes (from Lesson 7; page 6 of the Protecting Pollinators research notebook)
  • Highlighters: (yellow and blue; used by the teacher to highlight words on the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats")
  • Shades of Meaning anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "The Butterfly Garden" (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit next to their partner in the whole group meeting area.
  • Display "The Butterfly Garden" and tell students that they will now create motions to do while reading the poem.
  • Read aloud the first two lines of the poem and ask:

"What movement can we do to show butterflies?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Link thumbs together and flap hands like wings.)

"What movement can we do to show a tree?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Stand up and put arms up in the shape of a "V.")

  • Confirm movements for butterflies and tree.
  • Continue to read aloud the poem and brainstorm movements for flying, slept, and planted with students.
  • Invite students to recite the poem and act out the movements they brainstormed.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback for their creativity in brainstorming movements for the poem. Tell them they will recite this one more time tomorrow using the movements they brainstormed.
  • For ELLs: (Leadership) Invite an ELL to take the lead in deciding on motions to perform along with the poem.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part II, Session 4: Drafting a Conclusion (20 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can write a conclusion for my opinion piece about why people should protect butterflies."

  • Turn and Talk:

"What is an important word in this target?" (conclusion)

  • Tell students that they are almost finished writing their opinions for why people should protect butterflies.
  • Display the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats" and read aloud the conclusion written in black.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What does the conclusion say?" (We need to save the bats.)

  • Confirm with students that the purpose of a conclusion is to restate the opinion.
  • Display the Dangers That Butterflies Face and Reasons Butterflies Are Important: Class Notes. Remind students that they know reasons people should protect butterflies.
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time B of Lesson 4 to guide students through orally "writing" with their partners using their "pencil" (finger) and "paper" (hand):
  • Turn and Talk:

"What sentences will you write for your conclusion?" (Responses will vary, but may include: We need to help the butterflies! Many plants and animals need them.)

  • Circulate and listen in for examples to highlight with the whole group that align with the conclusion to Writing Model: "People Should Protect Butterflies" (example, for teacher reference).
  • Tell students they will work independently to write their conclusion in their My Opinion writing booklets. Encourage students to reference the Dangers That Butterflies Face and Reasons Butterflies Are Important: Student Notes on page 6 of their Protecting Pollinators research notebooks.
  • Transition students to their workspaces and point out the My Opinion writing booklets and Protecting Pollinators research notebooks already there. Invite students to move like an ant, bat, or butterfly pollinator to their seats.
  • Instruct students to complete the conclusion section of their My Opinion writing booklet on page 4.
  • Circulate and support students by directing them to read over their notes before writing. Refer to My Opinion writing booklet (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • After 10 minutes, refocus whole group.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Annotating the Model) After writing each part of the opinion paragraph, annotate the margins, naming the relevant part of the paragraph and its function. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with visual processing: (Reading Aloud and Monitoring Assessment) Read aloud any instructions for the written opinion piece and students' own notes if necessary. Rephrase directions. Monitor to ensure that students correctly complete the assessment. (MMR)
  • For students who may need additional support with self-regulation: As students write, support time management strategies by using a timer. (MME)

B. Revising Our Opinion Writing: Adding Linking Words (10 minutes)

  • Gather students together. With excitement, tell them they are almost done with their opinion pieces.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can revise my opinion piece to include linking words and phrases."

  • Turn and Talk:

"What are important words in this target?" (revise, linking words)

  • Review the definitions of revise and linking words.
  • Display the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats."
  • With a highlighter, highlight linking words and phrases in yellow: one reason, another reason, and because on the shared opinion writing model.
  • Say:

"These are linking words and phrases that connect reasons to an opinion."

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How many reasons did you give in your opinion piece?" (two)

"Will you need to add linking words?" (yes)

  • Model how to revise the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats" using a caret to add linking words. Think aloud to share why you revised the chosen part.
  • Transition students to their workspaces to revise their opinion writing to add linking words.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with sustained effort: (Transparency: Linking Words) To ensure that the general purpose of linking words is transparent, cue students to problem solve:

"Why are linking words and phrases important?" (to make writing clearer, help the reader go easily from one idea to the next, and explain how one idea makes sense with the next idea)

  • If necessary, clarify the meaning and purpose of each linking word and phrase. (MME)

C. Revising Our Opinion Writing: Adding Words with Shades of Meaning (15 minutes)

  • Gather students back together.
  • Again display the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats."
  • Highlight the verb drink.
  • Direct students' attention to the Shades of Meaning anchor chart and remind them that they have been thinking a lot, as readers, about how shades of meaning help authors be really accurate and specific. Now they get to apply that in their writing by choosing words that are the appropriate strength.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Is there a stronger word we can use instead of drink that would be more accurate and give the reader a more specific picture of a bat drinking nectar?" (Responses will vary, but may include sip.)

  • Model how to revise the Shared Opinion Writing: "People Should Protect Bats" by crossing out a word and writing a stronger word above it. Think aloud to share why you revised the chosen part.
  • Transition students to their workspaces to revise their opinion writing to add stronger adjectives and verbs.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with planning: (Using Paint Chips) Use paint chips to support students' understanding of shades of meaning. Distribute blank paint chips for students to use as they brainstorm stronger adjectives and verbs. See Levels of support in Lesson 7 for further details. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing Our Work: Opinion Writing (10 minutes)

  • Instruct students to bring their My Opinion writing booklets with them back to the whole group area and sit next to their partners.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on completing their opinion pieces.
  • Invite students to share their writing with their partner. Encourage partners to take turns reading their opinion piece to each other.
  • After each partner has shared, Turn and Talk:

"What is one area you revised in your opinion piece?" (Responses will vary.)

Conversation Cue: "Who can tell us what your writing partner said in your own words?" (Responses will vary.)

  • With enthusiasm, tell students they did a wonderful job of writing an opinion piece about why people should protect butterflies. In the next lesson, they will have a chance to further discuss pollinators such as butterflies and the dangers they face.
  • For students who may need additional support with engagement: Before students share their work, create an accepting and supportive classroom environment by encouraging students to respect the student's work and willingness to take a risk by sharing her or his work. (MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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