Preparing for the Unit 2 Assessment, Session 1: Analyzing a Model and Drafting an Introduction and Focus Statement. | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G2:M3:U2:L11

Preparing for the Unit 2 Assessment, Session 1: Analyzing a Model and Drafting an Introduction and Focus Statement.

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.2.2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • W.2.5: With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • SL.2.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.2.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.2.1c: Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • L.2.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze a model of informational writing about hummingbirds. (SL.2.1)
  • I can write an introduction and focus statement about how bees pollinate plants. (W.2.2, W.2.5, L.2.2)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During independent writing in Work Time B, use the Informative/Explanatory Writing Checklist to document students? progress toward W.2.2 and L.2.2 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Collaborating with Writing Partners (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing a Model: Hummingbirds as Pollinators (20 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: Writing the Introduction and Focus Statement in the Bee Writing Booklet (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Shared Writing: Writing the Introduction and Focus Statement for Shared Writing: Bees (15 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • In this lesson, students are introduced to the idea that researchers share what they learn by writing about it. Students shift from researching the Unit 2 guiding question: "How do pollinators help plants grow and survive?" to writing about the Unit 2 guiding question. They use their notes from their Research about Bees: Class Notes to write an introduction and focus statement about how bees help plants grow and survive (W.2.2). Throughout the lesson, students are reintroduced to the idea of working with a writing partner to plan and produce quality writing (W.2.5).
  • To understand how to write their own Bee Writing booklet, students first analyze a model paragraph about hummingbirds.
  • Note that in this lesson, the independent writing in Work Time B precedes the shared writing in the Closing. This is counter to a more typical gradual-release "I do/we do/you do" model. The rationale for this sequencing is to provide students with the opportunity to independently write each part of their booklet using their research about bees before independently completing the formal assessment of W.2.2 in Lessons 13 and 14.
  • In Work Time B, students write each part of the piece independently before co-creating the shared writing piece in the Closing on Shared Writing: Bees.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 5-7, students researched how bees help plants grow and survive. They were instructed in how to take notes and wrote a focus statement about their research.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional support writing the introduction and focus statement about pollination. Encourage them to use their Plants and Pollinators research notebook, Part II (specifically pages 7 and 11-14) to support their writing.

Down the road:

  • In Lessons 13-14, students will write an informational paragraph about their specific pollinators for the Unit 2 Assessment. In Lesson 15, they will use the Revising and Editing Checklist to provide feedback about L.2.2 in their writing.

In Advance

  • Prepare the Bee Writing booklets.
  • Preview the Hummingbird Writing Model, Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart, and Shared Writing: Bees.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson Materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1 and 2 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.A.1, 2.I.C.10, and 2.II.A.1

Important points in the lesson itself 

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to analyze a detailed model of the writing they are expected to produce later during their assessment.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to both comprehend the language in the model paragraph and to understand the role that each part plays in its structure. Guide students through a Mini Language Dive discussion about a sentence from the model paragraph?s introduction.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the Mini Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, consider working closely with a group of students who need heavier support writing their introductions. Complete it with them as a shared or interactive writing experience.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During Shared Writing, reinforce expectations that students read along silently in their heads as each statement is read aloud and written on the Shared Writing: Bees chart.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Continue to support a range of fine motor abilities and writing needs by offering students options for writing utensils. Also, consider supporting students' expressive skills by offering partial dictation of student responses.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Similar to previous lessons in this unit, students have opportunities to share ideas and thinking with classmates in this lesson. Continue to support students' engagement and self-regulatory skills during these activities by modeling and providing sentence frames as necessary.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New

  • hummingbird, detail sentences, informational writing (L)

Review

  • analyze, model, pollinator, pollination introduction, focus statement, conclusion, bees (L)

Materials

  • Unit 2 Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • What Researchers Do anchor chart (begun in Unit 1)
  • Writing Partners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Hummingbird Writing Model (one to display)
  • Writing Parts Labels (one to display)
  • Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting Materials)
  • Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Colored pencils (red, green, yellow; one of each for teacher modeling)
  • Bee Writing booklet (page 2; one per student and one to display)
  • Research about Bees: Class Notes (completed in Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Bee Writing booklet (example, for teacher reference)
  • Informative/Explanatory Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Shared Writing: Bees (new; co-created with students during the Closing; see supporting Materials)
  • Shared Writing: Bees (example, for teacher reference)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Collaborating with Writing Partners (5 minutes) 

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students that they have been working to learn about the secret behind the fruits, flowers, and vegetables we enjoy--pollinators!
  • Direct students' attention to the Unit 2 Guiding Question anchor chart and read it aloud:

"How do pollinators help plants to grow and survive?"

  • Tell students that this week they will continuing thinking about the Unit 2 guiding question. But now, instead of just reading and talking about it, they will start writing about it!
  • Direct students' attention to the What Researchers Do anchor chart. Tell students that they have done an awesome job collecting information about how insects pollinate plants. Now they will use this information to write about insect pollinators and share it with others. Say: "You will have the chance to share your writing with others at the Celebration of Learning at the end of the week!"
  • Invite students to do a microphone response and ask:

"Because we will be writing about our plants and pollinator research, what kind of partners do you think we should work with today?" (our writing partners)

  • Direct students' attention to the Writing Partners anchor chart. Remind them that they've seen this chart before--in Module 1, when they wrote about their The Most Important Thing about Schools books.
  • Focus students on the second row and read both columns aloud:
    • "Listen to and look at my writing partner's work."
    • "Focus on my partner while he or she speaks; handle my partner?s work gently."
  • Invite students to whisper a response into their hands and ask:

"What is one thing you will do to plan and think together with your writing partner?"(look at my partner, listen with care)

  • If productive, cue students to touch the body part they will use to plan and think together.

"Tell your partner what body part you will use and why." (Responses will vary, but may include: I will use my eyes to look at my partner.)

  • Invite students to move to sit with their writing partner
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Invite students to share one way they have collaborated in a previous lesson. (MMR, MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing a Model: Hummingbirds as Pollinators (20 minutes) 

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • "I can analyze a model of informational writing about hummingbirds."
  • Turn and Talk:

"What are important words in this target?" (analyze, model, informational, hummingbirds)

  • Remind students that analyze means to examine something closely and model means a strongexample.
  • Tell students that the word informational is a new, important word used in the target. It tells us the type or writing, which helps us understand the purpose. Say: "Informational" writing means to inform, or teach, our readers about all we have learned."
  • Display the Hummingbird Writing Model and read it aloud.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What is this writing model all about?" (Responses will vary, but may include: hummingbirds and plants, how hummingbirds pollinate plants)

"What did you learn about hummingbirds from this writing model?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Hummingbirds drink nectar from flowers; pollen sticks to their long beak and back of their head.)

  • Refocus students and confirm the gist of the Hummingbird Writing Model: how hummingbirds pollinate plants.
  • Tell students that they are learning not only about how hummingbirds pollinate plants from this model but also how to structure their writing. Say:

"We are going to spend some time looking closely at the structure of the Hummingbird Writing Model. This will help us structure our writing in the next few days."

  • Display the Writing Parts Labels (introduction, focus statement, detail sentence, conclusion).Say:

"The structure of this paragraph is broken into four parts."

  • In random order, read each Writing Part Label aloud.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What order do these parts go in?" (introduction, focus statement, detail sentences, conclusion)

  • Direct students' attention to the Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart. Say:

"We will use the criteria to color code the Hummingbird Writing Model to make sure it is correct and each part does its job."

  • Model how to match each part of the Hummingbird Writing Model with the criteria listed on the Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart. Read each criterion aloud and identify the part of the Hummingbird Writing Model with a specific color. Refer to the Criteria for Writing Booklet anchor chart (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • "Introduction that introduces reader to the topic." Underline the introduction using a red colored pencil: Pollen helps plants make seeds, fruit and new plants. Plants need birds to accidentally move pollen from plant to plant. These birds are called pollinators.
    • "Focus statement that gives focus to the booklet." Underline the introduction using a green colored pencil: Hummingbirds are pollinators that help plants grow and survive.
    • One detail sentence about why hummingbirds are attracted to plants. Underline the introduction using a yellow colored pencil: Hummingbirds fly quickly to red flowers to drink nectar.
    • One detail sentence about how hummingbirds' bodies help make pollination happen. Underline the introduction using a yellow colored pencil: When they visit a flower, pollen sticks to their long beaks and top of their head.
    • One detail sentence about how hummingbirds move pollen to new places. Underline the introduction using a yellow colored pencil: When it flies to another flower, some of the pollen grains fall off and are left there.
    • Conclusion that tells why pollination is important and repeats the focus statement in a different way. Underline the introduction using a green colored pencil: When the new flower is pollinated, a new seed can grow. Hummingbirds are important pollinators that help new plants grow and survive!
  • Referring to the color-coded model, ask:

"What information do you have to know about pollination to be able to write a paragraph like this?" (You have to know how pollinators pollinate. You have to know what pollen is.)

  • Say:

"Next, we will use our research about bees to start writing an informational paragraph explaining how bees pollinate plants. Get your minds ready to write!"

  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. "Plants/need birds/to accidentally move pollen/from plant to plant."
    • Deconstruct: Discuss the sentence and each chunk. Language goals for focus structure:
  • "What?" / Meaning: The birds move the pollen that gets stuck to them. The plants need this to grow and survive. (infinitive verb)
  • accidentally: "How?" / Meaning: An adverb that describes the verb move. The birds do not know they are moving pollen. (adverb)
  • Practice: Invite students to use another adverb to describe how birds move pollen: Plants need birds to _____ move pollen from flower to flower. (quietly, quickly)
    • Reconstruct: Reread the sentence. Ask:

"Now what do you think the sentence means?"

"How is this a good sentence to write in an introduction?" (It tells the reader something about the topic."

    • Practice: Plants need _____ to accidentally move pollen from flower to flower. (insects; bees)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with comprehension: (Paragraph Structure: Using a Pattern as a Model) Discuss structure through analyzing a pattern of colors. Display a repeating pattern of two or three colors. (Example: blue, green, yellow/blue, green...) Ask:

"Can you guess which color you will find next?" (yellow)

"What is your evidence?" (I see blue and green.)

  • Say:

"A pattern can also be called a structure. How did this structure make it easier to guess which color you will find next?" (You know what to expect because you know the pattern, or the way it is organized.)

  • Say:

"Paragraphs also have a pattern, or organization, or structure, because it makes it easier for readers to know what information they will find next." (MMR)

B. Independent Writing: Writing the Introduction and Focus Statement in the Bee Writing Booklet (20 minutes) 

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • "I can write an introduction and focus statement about how bees pollinate plants."
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:
    • "What pollinator will we be writing about today?" (bees)
    • "What sound does a bee make?" (buzz)
  • With excitement, tell students that in future lessons they will get to write about the pollinator they researched in their small group, but first they are going to practice writing independently about bees. After they have the chance to practice independently, the class will use their writing to work together to construct a Shared Writing: Bees.
  • Distribute Bee Writing booklets.
  • Display the Hummingbird Writing Model and focus students on the introduction. Read it aloud:
    • "Pollen helps plants make seeds, fruit, and new plants. Plants need birds to accidentally move pollen from plant to plant. These birds are called pollinators. Hummingbirds are pollinators that help plants grow and survive."
  • Turn and Talk:

"What does this introduction and focus statement tell us?" (describes why pollen is important, introduces bird pollinators, tells that hummingbirds pollinators help plants)

  • Direct students' attention to the Research about Bees: Class Notes. Say:

"To find information for the introduction and focus statement, we will look back on our Research about Bees: Class Notes."

  • Think-Pair-Share:

"What is the same of both bees and hummingbirds? What is different?" (They both move pollen by flying. They are both good pollinators. Hummingbirds are a type of bird. Bees are a type of insect.)

"What needs to be included for the introduction and focus statement?" (Describe why pollen is important and insects are needed for pollination, and introduce bees as a type of insect pollinator.)

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

"Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Display page 2 of the Bee Writing booklet and invite students to turn to this same page in their booklet.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What will you write for your introduction about bees? Remember, the job of the introduction is to describe why pollen is important and that insects are needed for pollination."

  • Refocus students whole group and invite students to write their introduction on page 2 of their booklet.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What you write for your focus statement about bees? Remember, the job of the focus statement is to introduce bees as pollinators."

  • Refocus students whole group and invite students to write their focus statement on page 2 of their booklet.
  • Circulate and support students as they write by directing them to the classroom supports (e.g., Research about Bees: Class Notes, Word Walls, anchor charts). Refer to the Bee Writing booklet (example, for teacher reference) as necessary. Also, consider using the Informative/Explanatory Writing Checklist to gather data on students' progress toward W.2.2 and L.2.2.
  • After 8-10 minutes, invite students back to the meeting area with their Bee Writing booklet while singing "It's Pollination Time"
  • For ELLs: (Sentence Frames: Heavier Support) Provide students with sentence frames to support writing. (Example: Pollen helps plants _____. Plants need _____ to accidentally move _____ from plant to plant. These _____ are called _____. _____ are pollinators that help plants grow and survive.)
  • For students who may need additional support with comprehension: Provide index cards pre-written with each sentence from the model. Invite students to manipulate the index cards as they identify similarities and differences between hummingbirds and bees. (MMR, MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Writing: Writing the Introduction and Focus Statement for Shared Writing: Bees (15 minutes) 

  • Invite students to give you an air high-five for their hard work today as writers.
  • Direct students' attention to the Shared Writing: Bees.
  • Say:

"We are going to use your great ideas about bees to write an introduction and focus statement about bees all together so we can come up with the best example of an introduction and focus statement about bees."

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What will the introduction include?" (introduce why pollen is important, why plants need insect pollinators, and define insects as pollinators)

  • If productive, cue students to add on to what a classmate said:

"Who can add on to what your classmate said? I'll give you time to think."

  • Turn and Talk:

"What did you write for your introduction?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Pollen helps make seeds, fruits, and new plants. Plants need bees to move pollen. Bees are called pollinators.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite several students to share their responses.
  • As students share out, clarify and capture an introduction on the Shared Writing: Bees. Refer to the Shared Writing: Bees (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Say:

"Wow! All of your ideas helped us write our Shared Writing: Bees."

  • Read aloud the introduction. Invite students to give you a thumbs-up if these sentences make sense to them.
  • Invite students to give you a thumbs-up if this part of the introduction does its job: introduces pollen, explains why plants need insects, and defines insects as pollinators.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What comes next, after the introduction?" (focus statement)

  • Referring to the Shared Writing: Bees, share that students will now collaborate to write the focus statement about bees.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What did you write your focus statement?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Bees are excellent pollinators. Bees pollinate many flowers.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite several students to share their responses.
  • As students share out, clarify and capture a focus statement on the Shared Writing: Bees. Refer to the Shared Writing: Bees (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Say:

"Wow! All of your ideas helped us write our Shared Writing: Bees."

  • Read aloud the introduction. Invite students to give you a thumbs-up if these sentences make sense to them.
  • Invite students to give you a thumbs-up if this part of the introduction does its job: introduces pollen, explains why plants need insects, and defines insects as pollinators.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What comes next, after the introduction?" (focus statement)

  • Referring to the Shared Writing: Bees, share that students will now collaborate to write the focus statement about bees.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What did you write your focus statement?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Bees are excellent pollinators. Bees pollinate many flowers.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite several students to share their responses.
  • As students share out, clarify and capture a focus statement on the Shared Writing: Bees. Refer to the Shared Writing: Bees (example, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Thank students for sharing their thinking to help write the focus statement.
  • Tell students to look at the introduction and focus statement in their Bee Writing booklet and make sure it does its job. Invite students to read their sentences out loud to their writing partners.
  • After 2-3 minutes, share with students that they will complete their Bee Writing booklet in the next lesson.
  • For ELLs: (Thinking Aloud: Purpose) While completing the shared writing, think aloud to emphasize the purpose of each part of the paragraph. (Example: "Hm ... do we know what this paragraph is about? Not yet. Let's add some sentences to tell the reader exactly what our topic is.")
  • For ELLs: (Leadership) Invite a few students who might normally shy away from participation to share the introductions and focus statements they wrote.
  • For students who may need additional support with sustained effort and motivation: Continue to remind students of the goal and relevance for the work they are doing with this writing. (MME)

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