Shared Research: Diving Deeper to Learn about Schools | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G2:M1:U3:L4

Shared Research: Diving Deeper to Learn about Schools

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.2.1: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.7: Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
  • W.2.7: Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • SL.2.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.2.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.2.1b: Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.
  • SL.2.1c: Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • SL.2.3: Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can research a school to find more details about how it is similar to and different from my school. (RI.2.1, RI.2.7, W.2.7)
  • I can respond to others' ideas during a collaborative conversation about an interesting fact from our research. (SL.2.1, SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, SL.2.1c, SL.2.3)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Closing and Assessment A, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor students' progress toward SL.2.1b and SL.2.1c (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Revealing Research School Teams (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Guided Practice: Creating Research Note-catchers (15 minutes)

B. Small Group Research, Part I: Viewing Pictures Closely (15 minutes)

C. Small Group Research, Part II: Research Schools Videos (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Collaborative Conversations Protocol: Sharing Interesting Facts (10 minutes)

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students research in small groups to learn more about one of the schools they have learned about in Lessons 1-3. Students will use photographs and videos of the school to collect new information and will pull from the public notes to collect existing information. Students will then use information to help them write their "The Most Important Thing about Schools" book for the performance task in Lessons 6-9.
  • This is the first lesson in which students are introduced to shared or independent research. In this lesson, the research is fairly guided in order to help students build confidence in the new skill of researching. In future modules, students will participate in more shared and independent research with less teacher guidance.
  • During Work Time B, students use the Close Viewing protocol to re-examine the pictures from Unit 2, Lesson 1. Consider finding other pictures of each school for students to view closely as well.
  • In Work Time C, in small groups, students watch three short videos from YouTube.
  • Purpose: Students take turns watching a short movie about their research school to take notes about new details they learn as they watch. Students will be responsible for capturing notes for their own research school that will help them in a compare and contrast discussion in Lesson 5.
  • During the Closing, students participate in the Collaborative Conversations protocol with the same group members as in previous lessons. This allows students to share one interesting fact about their research school with familiar group members in preparation for the larger conversation during the Unit 3 assessment in Lesson 5.
  • Lessons 1-3 featured built-out instruction for Goal 2 Conversation Cues. Moving forward, this will appear only as reminders after select questions. Continue using Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. Refer to the Lesson 1 Teaching Notes and see the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 1-3, students worked together to research three schools around the world by comparing and contrasting those schools to their own. In this lesson, students research more about one of those three schools by participating in small group research with photographs and videos.
  • In Lessons 1 and 2, students practiced using the Collaborative Conversations protocol with sentence starters to help them build toward mastery of speaking and listening standards (SL.2.1b, SL.2.1c). In this lesson, students use those sentence starters during the Collaborative Conversations protocol to talk about their research findings.
  • Areas in which students may need additional support:
  • In the Opening, students learn which research school group they have been placed in. To help students who may feel disappointed with their placement, consider including a friend in the group of students who did not receive their first choice.
  • In Work Time A, students use the public notes anchor chart for their research school to write four details onto their own Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catchers. To ensure students can visually focus on one set of details at a time, consider covering the contrast section of the public notes and the note-catchers until it is time to write those details.
  • In Work Times B and C, students participate in small group research by closely viewing pictures and videos. To ensure all students stay focused on their task, give visual time cues with a timer or give silent updates with your fingers to indicate remaining time. Consider also narrating a few students' work who are on task to give other students a cue about where they should be with their progress ("I notice Natalie is looking closely at the details in her picture"; "I notice Sean using the Language for Comparing and Contrasting chart to explain details to his partner").

Down the road:

  • Students will use the notes collected in this lesson to develop sentences for their "The Most Important Thing about Schools" book for the performance task in Lessons 6-9.
  • In the next lesson, students complete the Unit 3 assessment, where they will be assessed on their progress toward SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, and SL.2.1c.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Research School Teams chart by using the information gained from the Research Schools voting sheets in Lesson 3 and dividing students into three research groups for each of the three schools to study: boat school, tent school, and doorstep school. Consider placing students from one collaborative conversation group into different school research teams. Note that students who work in the doorstep school research group will not have the additional support of learning about this school in Unit 2. Students in this group will be required to build more knowledge during their research and may need additional support.
    • Classroom space for three separate research groups to work simultaneously. Post each research school's public notes anchor chart in its own designated area in the classroom. Place enough pencils and Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catchers by each public notes anchor chart. Place four copies of each research school photo for that school in the designated area as well.
    • Prepare technology necessary to play "Making Waves," "UNICEF: "Tent Schools" provide refuge for children in Haiti" and "A Doorstep School" in Work Time C. Make sure each research group has at least one computer with the correct video loaded to watch in their small groups.
    • Review the Collaborative Conversations protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Close Viewing anchor chart, public notes anchor charts, Language for Comparing and Contrasting anchor chart, Collaborative Conversations Protocol anchor chart, and Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time A: Students complete the Comparing and Contrasting research note-catcher using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc.
  • Work Time A: Students use Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software like Dictation.io.
  • Work Time B: Students view photographs in an online gallery or presentation, for example Google Slides.
  • Work Time C: Prepare technology necessary for students to access video:
    • "Making Waves: Floating Schools in Bangladesh" (Learning World: S2E44, 1/3). YouTube, July 2012. Web. 10 May 2016. (For display. Used by permission.)
    • "Tent Schools" provide refuge for children in Haiti" Video. YouTube, March. 2010. Web. 10 May 2016. (For display.)
    • "Door Step School--Education Moves On to Every Door Step." YouTube, Mar. 2013. Web. 10 May 2016. (For display. Used by permission.)
  • Consider that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, be sure to preview links and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, for actually viewing these links in the classroom.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they participate in the Collaborative Conversation protocol to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment B: If students were recorded during Closing and Assessment A, consider replaying excerpts of these recordings to help students self-assess their learning.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.A.1, 2.I.A.3, 2.I.B.5, 2.I.B.6, and 2.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with the opportunity to work collaboratively with peers. It also provides them with a variety of visual representations of content, such as videos and photographs. This will provide students with multiple access points to support comprehension and language development.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to take notes based on information from the videos and photographs because it requires them to efficiently process and categorize potentially unfamiliar language and information into succinct phrases. Unpack this process whenever possible and provide support as students collect information. See Meeting Students' Needs column and Levels of Support for further suggestions.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time C, as students are taking notes on important details from the videos, allow students in the group to work with partners to identify details and take notes together.

For heavier support:

  • Create small sentence strips or index cards with details from the public notes. Illustrate them with icons to represent their meanings. Provide each group with the manipulative details and invite students to choose the details they would like to use in their research note-catchers. For students who struggle with writing, provide sticky notes of details that they can paste directly onto their research note-catchers.
  • Consider grouping ELLs who need heavier support together in the same research school team. Provide this group with scaffolded materials, such as partially pre-filled note-catchers. Consider working closely with this group throughout the unit and completing their small group research activities and "The Most Important Thing about Schools" books with them as shared or guided writing projects.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing, students share reflections on the learning targets. Some students may better comprehend if reflections are represented visually in addition to aurally. Visually display their ideas by writing their reflections on a whiteboard or chart paper.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Times A and B, students record details on the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher. This note-catcher includes several sections for recording different information, which may be confusing for some students. Support management of information by helping students cover sections of the note-catcher with sticky notes so that they can focus on completing one section at a time.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the Opening, students form their new research groups based on their votes. Some students may be disappointed, frustrated, or nervous about joining their new team, especially if they didn't get their first choice. Before displaying the Research School Teams chart, support students in managing feelings by discussing ways to respond if they didn't get their first choice for a school to research.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • research, detail, respond, collaborative, team (L)

Materials

  • Research School Teams chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Public Notes: Boat Schools anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Public Notes: Tent Schools anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Public Notes: Doorstep Schools anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Language for Comparing and Contrasting anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Close Viewing anchor chart (Lesson 1, Unit 1)
  • Research school photos (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; one per pair)
  • "Making Waves: Floating Schools in Bangladesh" (video; play :00 to 2:26; see Teaching Notes)
  • "UNICEF: "Tent Schools" provide refuge for children in Haiti" (video; play :00 to 2:49; see Teaching Notes)
  • "Door Step School--Education Moves On to Every Door Step" (video; play 12:30 to 14:00; see Teaching Notes)
  • Collaborative Conversations Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Sentence Starters: Day 3 tracking sheet (from Lesson 3; new copies; one per student)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Revealing Research School Teams (5 minutes)

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Tell them that today is a very exciting day because they get to find out their research school teams.
  • Briefly remind students that in the previous lesson, they rated the schools (boat, tent, and doorstep) 1-3 to show which they were most interested in learning more about.
  • Emphasize that all the schools are interesting to learn about, so even if they didn't get their first choice, there will be exciting new facts to learn about all of the schools.
  • Display the Research School Teams chart and reveal the research groups.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What are you excited to learn about, or what are you wondering about your research school?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Briefly tell students that in today's lesson they will begin finding facts about their research school with their teams.
  • Define the word team as a group formed to work together.
  • Ask:

"What is the translation of team in our home languages?" (equipo in Spanish) Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation in a home language other than their own to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Choral repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What teams do you know?" (Responses will vary, but may include: sports team, construction teams, business teams.)

What do teams do? (collaborate, work together to reach a goal, meet a challenge)

  • Tell students that they will have a chance to work with their research teams later in the lesson.
  • Invite students to push the imaginary button on their brain to show they are ready to work and learn!
  • Before displaying the Research School Teams chart, support students in managing frustration by discussing ways to respond if they didn't get their first choice for a school to research. (Example: "Yesterday you voted for your top three choices of schools to study. I tried my best to give everyone their first or second choice for research teams. You may not get your first choice, and that might feel disappointing. What are some strategies that can help if you feel disappointed?") (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Guided Practice: Creating Research Note-catchers (15 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can research a school to find more details about how it is similar to and different from my school."

  • Briefly review the definitions for research (study or collect information) and details (small important part) as necessary.
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the learning target.
  • Display the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher and tell students this is the resource they will use to track their learning about their school.
  • The first thing they will add to their note-catcher are details from the Public Notes: Boat Schools anchor chart, Public Notes: Tent Schools anchor chart, and Public Notes: Doorstep Schools anchor chart. Remind students that these notes come from the Off to Class text they have read in previous lessons.
  • Tell students that they will practice this all together now.
  • Assign each research team to a designated workspace and invite them to move there now.
  • Distribute the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher.
  • Give students 1 minute to think of a team name together.
  • Guide students through this process, providing prompts and time checks to keep students moving along:
    • Say:

"Your first job is to look at the public notes anchor chart for your research school. As you look at the chart, select one detail about how this school is similar to our school. When you have chosen this detail, put your hand on your head."

    • Invite students to begin.
    • Once most students have their hands on their head, invite them to turn and share their detail with an elbow partner on their team. Refer students to the Language for Comparing and Contrasting anchor chart as necessary.
    • Refocus whole group and select one volunteer to share a detail with the class.
    • Model writing this information in the first row of the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher as a model for students.
    • Invite students to write their detail in the first row of their own research note-catcher.
    • Circulate to support students as they write their details.
  • Guide students through steps 1, 2 and 5 three more times (once more for the compare portion of the note-catcher and twice for the contrast).
  • At the end of this chunk of Work Time, students should have written four details in their note-catcher, two each for the Contrast and Compare sections.
  • Invite students to stand up and give a teammate an air high-five to acknowledge a successful start to school research.
  • For ELLs: Read aloud or chorally read the public notes for each group. Invite students to raise their hands if they are not sure or cannot remember the meaning of any of the language written on the public notes. If ELLs have been placed together in a group, take more time to unpack the information on their group's chart. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Ensure that all students understand which public notes they should be considering as they choose details to transfer to their own Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catchers. Consider moving each public notes chart to the designated areas of the room for each group to make clear where students must focus their attention. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: If the public notes were created according to a color-coding system to further contrast similarities and differences, encourage students to use colored pencils to reflect the same coding system in their own note-catchers. (MMAE)
  • As students record details on the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher, support management of information by helping students cover sections of the note-catcher with sticky notes so that they can focus on completing one section at a time. (MMAE)

B. Small Group Research, Part I: Viewing Pictures Closely (15 minutes)

  • Point out to students that they've added information to their note-catchers from anchor charts previously completed in class. Now they are going to add information to their note-catcher by closely looking at some photographs.
  • Display the Close Viewing anchor chart.
  • Tell students they are going to work with a partner from their team to look more closely at some photographs using the Close Viewing protocol. Remind students that they used this protocol in Unit 1 and review it as necessary. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the research school photos, inviting them to rotate photographs with another pair on their research team every 3 or 4 minutes. Encourage students to use language from the Language for Comparing and Contrasting anchor chart as they discuss the photographs.
  • After 12 minutes, invite students to bring their research note-catchers and return to the whole group area.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to look closely at pictures to find similarities and differences between their research school and their own school. (Example: "Carlos, I saw that you looked closely to find the details in the pictures. Ramona, I noticed that you wrote your ideas clearly on your note-catcher.")
  • For ELLs: Frame this activity by introducing students to a "spot the difference" puzzle. Briefly guide students through a comparison of two seemingly identical photographs. Use the Close Viewing anchor chart to make observations within the puzzle. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Before inviting students to find details to compare and contrast, model and think aloud the process of identifying details and drawing conclusions. Provide sentence frames to support this thinking. This will provide an entry point for students who may have trouble drawing conclusions immediately. Examples:
    • "I see _____."
    • "That makes me think _____."
    • "One thing this detail helped me learn is _____."
    • "___and ____ are different because ...") (MMAE)
  • As students record details on the Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catcher, support management of information by helping students cover sections of the note-catcher with sticky notes so that they can focus on completing one section at a time. (MMAE)

C. Small Group Research, Part II: Research Schools Videos (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that they will now watch videos about their research schools to learn even more about them.
  • Explain that there are computers set up for their small groups with a video about their particular school. Tell students that after they watch the video with their small group, they will have a chance to add to their notes.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What do you think is important for us to do as we watch the videos separately?" (keep our voices off, look closely at the images, listen closely to the words, think about what we are seeing and hearing)

  • Invite students to return to their small group research areas. Invite one student to be in charge of starting and stopping the video.
  • Since the videos are about the same length of time, wait for all students to finish watching their videos in small groups.
  • After the groups have had a chance to watch their videos, invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner in their group:

"What is one detail you learned from the video?" (Responses will vary, but may include: Parents like the new school.)

  • Invite students write a detail about the school that they have learned from watching the video down on their research note-catcher.
  • Give students positive, specific feedback on taking notes on the videos. (Example: "Juan, I noticed that you watched the video very carefully. Martina, I saw that you wrote down exactly what you saw in the video on your note-catcher.")
  • Invite students to give a partner a fist bump to acknowledge their hard work.
  • For ELLs: Play each video twice. This will provide students a greater opportunity to process the language and content in each video. It will also allow students to focus more closely on the details the second time they view it, after they are exposed to the main ideas and context during the first viewings. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: To relieve the pressure of writing down details in the time between each video, invite the whole class to brainstorm important details for all three videos. Designate a strong writer as a scribe for each group. The scribe can take notes for the group as the whole class offers ideas. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Collaborative Conversations Protocol: Sharing Interesting Facts (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that they will now have the opportunity to share their most interesting research detail with a small group.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can respond to others' ideas during a collaborative conversation about an interesting fact from our research."

  • Review definitions of the words respond (to answer or reply in some way) and collaborative (cooperative and working together) as necessary.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Collaborative Conversations protocol. Remind them that they have been using this protocol in the past few lessons, and review as necessary using the Collaborative Conversations Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Invite students to take their Contrasting and Comparing Research note-catchers and transition into their collaborative conversation groups.
  • Distribute new copies of Sentence Starters: Day 3 tracking sheet.
  • Guide students through each step of the Collaborative Conversations protocol using this question:

What is one interesting fact you learned about your research school today?

  • Circulate to observe students as they discuss and gather data on SL.2.1b and SL.2.1c using the Speaking and Listening Checklist. Support students with using prompts by rereading the sentence starters to them or inviting them to take a turn in the discussion.
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Invite students to shake hands with their collaborative conversation group members for their work.

B. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area and focus their attention on the learning targets.
  • Reread the first learning target aloud:

"I can research a school to find more details about how it is similar to and different from my school."

  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

"How well did the class do with researching a school to find a new detail?"

  • Call on one or two volunteers to share out with the class.
  • Repeat the process with the second learning target.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

"Can you say more about that?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to give a round of applause for the hard work they did with researching, and tell them that they will begin to use their research to write books in tomorrow's lesson.
  • For ELLs: Buy or ask for large paint chips from a local hardware or paint store, or print them online. Write the words respond, answer, reply, and return, each one on a different shade of the paint chip. Place them on the wall and discuss the shades of meaning in relation to the Collaborative Conversations protocol. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Assess students' comfort level with finding details by offering statements such as: "I didn't understand what to do" or "I found lots of details." Students can raise their hands if the statements apply to them. To reduce stigma, ask students to close their eyes during the activity. (MME)
  • As students share reflections, provide alternatives to auditory information by visually displaying their ideas. You can do this by writing their ideas on a whiteboard or chart paper. (MMR)

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