Scaffolded Writing: Leave Pale Male’s Nest Up! | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M4:U2:L8

Scaffolded Writing: Leave Pale Male’s Nest Up!

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.1.1: Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.7: Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of "how-to" books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.5: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.1.1d: Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
  • L.1.1h: Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
  • L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.1.2b: Use end punctuation for sentences.
  • L.1.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can complete an opinion paragraph by writing the opinion statement and one reason to support it. (W.1.1, W.1.7, W.1.8. L.1.1, L.1.1c, L.1.1d, L.1.1h, L.1.2, L.1.2b, L.1.6)
  • I can create a sign with an illustration and a reason to support an opinion. (W.1.8, SL.1.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During scaffolded writing in Work Time A, use the Opinion Writing Checklist to track students' progress toward W.1.1, W.1.7, and W.1.8 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, use the Language Checklist to track students' progress toward (L.1.1, L.1.d, L.1.1h, L.1.2, L.1.2b, and L.1.6) (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: "Feed the Birds" Two-Voice Poem (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Scaffolded Writing: "Leave the Nest Up!" (25 minutes)

B. Engaging the Writer: "Take the Nest Down!" Sign (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In the Opening, students revisit the two-voice poem from Lesson 7 to practice fluency and will practice voting for one of the opinions expressed in the poem (feed the birds or don't feed the birds). This activity reinforces the need for students to use a reason to support their opinion.
  • In Work Time A, students review the parts of an opinion paragraph. They then start a new opinion paragraph to support the opinion "Leave the Nest Up!" Students are given a pre-written introduction, so the focus is on writing the opinion statement choosing a reason from the Pale Male: Class Notes to support the opinion.
  • In Work Time A, students revise and edit their writing using the Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist. This list helps students incorporate many of the language standards they have practiced and will be used again in Lesson 10 for their Unit 2 Assessment.
  • Work Time B follows a similar routine to Lesson 7 but challenges students to choose a reason that supports the opinion "Take the Nest Down!"

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students use the two-voice poem from Lesson 7 to develop their own opinion about the content in this lesson.
  • In Lessons 6-7, students analyzed a model and wrote a shared writing opinion paragraph. In this lesson, students are given another scaffolded release by independently completing an opinion paragraph.
  • In Lesson 7, students created a sign using a reason to support the opinion that Pale Male's nest should be left up. In this lesson, students create the same type of sign using a reason to support the opinion that the nest should be taken down. This prepares them for the Unit 2 Assessment in Lesson 9.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In the Opening, students may need a visual reminder of how to use their arms to show their opinion. Consider adding a picture or modeling in the moment. Also, consider underlining the reasons presented in the poem and adding a visual to help students support their opinion.
  • Refer to Lesson 7 for supports for Work Time B.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 9, students will continue using the two-voice poem for movement and fluency practice.
  • In Lesson 9, students will independently write an opinion paragraph to support the opinion "Take the Nest Down!" for their Unit 2 Assessment.
  • In Lesson 10, students use their signs from Lessons 7-8 and participate in the Pinky Partners protocol to discuss their final opinion on Pale Male's nest.

In Advance

  • Pre-distribute materials for Work Times A and B at student workspaces.
  • Post: Learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout Modules 1-3 to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.B.6, 1.I.B.8, 1.II.C.6, 1.l.C.10, and 1.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through opportunities to practice writing an effective opinion paragraph about Pale Male's nest. This lesson scaffolds to the Unit 2 Assessment on W.1.1.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to use the Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist (see levels of support and the Meeting Students' Needs column).

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Help students annotate the introduction of page 6 of their Pale Male research notebook by writing the word problem by the first sentence of the introduction and the phrase opinions on the topic  by the second sentence of the introduction.

For heavier support:

  • Preview the Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist and model using the checklist to revise a volunteer student's work. Display the revised version next to the original version and ask students to notice and share what is different about each one.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to reduce barriers to metacognition in this lesson by providing a visual reminder of the focus for each activity.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): Continue to support those who may struggle with expressive language by providing sentence frames to help them organize their thoughts.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to encourage self-regulatory skills and help students anticipate and manage frustration by modeling what to do if they need help from their partners.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • compelling (L)

Materials

  • "Feed the Birds" two-voice poem (from Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Respectful Opinions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 5)
  • Parts of an Opinion Paragraph anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6)
  • Pale Male: Class Notes (completed in Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Paper (blank; one piece; used by the teacher to cover a reason on the Pale Male: Class Notes)
  • Pale Male research notebook (from Lesson 2; added to during Work Times A and B; pages 5-6; one per student)
  • Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist (one to display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Shared Writing Template: "Leave the Nest Up!" (from Lesson 7; for teacher reference)
  • Pale Male research notebook (from Lesson 2; example, for teacher reference)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: "Feed the Birds" Two-Voice Poem (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Display the "Feed the Birds" two-voice poem and the Respectful Opinions anchor chart.
  • Turn and Talk:

"What is this poem about?" (a person who likes to feed birds and a person who doesn't like to feed birds)

Conversation Cue: "What, in the text, makes you think so?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students that today they will share their opinion on whether or not to feed birds.
  • Invite students to chorally read the poem aloud.
  • Tell students that they will stand up in a moment to read the poem a second time. After they do, they will get to vote:
    • If they think birds should be fed, they will put two thumbs up in the air.
    • If they do not think the birds should be fed, they will put their arms in front of them like an X.
  • Remind students to listen for a reason to support their opinion.
  • Invite students to stand up and read the poem aloud again.
  • Invite students to vote using their arms.
  • Invite students to look around and notice their classmates' opinions.
  • Remind students to participate in respectful conversations by using some of the ideas from the Respectful Opinions anchor chart.
  • Call on two or three volunteers to share with the class a reason that supports their opinion.
  • Invite students to turn to an elbow partner and share their opinion and reason.
  • Model using one of the "responding respectfully" responses from the Respectful Opinions anchor chart. (Examples: "I hear what you are saying" or "Thank you for your ideas.")
  • For ELLs: (Using Anchor Charts) Reread the Respectful Opinions anchor chart and tell students they will focus on "responding respectfully" as they vote.
  • For ELLs: (Practicing Pronunciation) Invite students to focus on fluency as they say the sentences "I hear what you are saying" and "Thanks for sharing" with appropriate expression and intonation.
  • For students who may need additional support with reading fluency: Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more confident reading aloud near students who may not feel as confident. (MMAE, MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Scaffolded Writing: "Leave the Nest Up!" (25 minutes)

  • Invite students to have a seat.
  • Tell students that they will get to write about leaving Pale Male's nest up, just like in the previous lesson.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

"I can complete an opinion paragraph by writing the opinion statement and one reason to support it."

  • Invite students to show with their fingers how many parts are in an opinion paragraph (four).
  • Share with students that the introduction and conclusion sentences will be written for them, but they will write the opinion and reason on their own.
  • Direct students' attention to the Parts of an Opinion Paragraph anchor chart.
  • Read through each part of an opinion paragraph and the job it does.
  • Remind students that they wrote an opinion paragraph together in the previous lesson.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What was our opinion paragraph about in the previous lesson?" (leaving the nest up)

"What reason did we use in our paragraph?" (people love watching the birds)

  • Display the Pale Male: Class Notes.
  • Confirm that in the previous lesson they used the reason "People love watching the birds."
  • Cover the reason "People love watching the birds" on the Pale Male: Class Notes with a blank piece of paper.
  • Tell students that they will practice using a new reason to support leaving the nest up.
  • Display page 6 of the Pale Male research notebook and read the introduction aloud.
  • Remind students:
    • The first sentence of the introduction states the problem.
    • The second sentence of the introduction tells the two opinions on the topic.
  • Point to the middle, labeled "opinion statement and reason."
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How do we write an opinion statement to show what we think?" (I think ____.)

  • Turn and Talk:

"Tell your partner what your opinion statement will sound like." (I think Pale Male's nest should stay up.)

  • Direct students' attention back to the Pale Male research notebook.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What word do we use to connect our opinion to our reason?" (because)

  • Turn and Talk:

"What is a reason to support your opinion?" (Responses will vary, but should come from the Pale Male: Class Notes.)

  • Display the Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist and briefly review it to remind students what to include in their writing.
  • Invite students to whisper a response into their hands:

"What will you write for your opinion statement and reason, using only one sentence?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Consider modeling as needed using the Shared Writing Template: "Leave the Nest Up!" and emphasizing the words I think and because:
    • "I think Pale Male's nest should stay up because people love watching the birds."
  • Use a routine established in Module 3 to transition students back to their workspaces.
    • Point out the Pale Male research notebook already there. Invite students to turn to page 6.
    • Invite students to use their finger to follow along as you read the introduction aloud.
    • Invite students to begin writing their opinion statement and reason.
    • Circulate to support students as they write. Refer to the Pale Male research notebook (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • When 5 minutes remain, display the Unit 2 Assessment Revise and Edit Checklist.
    • Tell students that they will take time to revise their writing to make it easier for readers to understand.
    • Read through the checklist to remind students to revise for capital letters, punctuation, spelling, and phrases for the opinion statement and reason.
    • Invite students to return to their opinion statement and reason sentence and begin revising.
  • After 5 minutes, refocus whole group and give students specific, positive feedback on writing their opinion statement and new reason.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with planning: (Using Charts) When reading through the Parts of an Opinion Paragraph anchor chart, mark the introduction and conclusion with a checkmark to show that these will already be written for them. Show students page 6 of the Pale Male research notebook and point to the introduction and conclusion on that page. (MMR, MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: (Verbal Writing Practice) Allow students to discuss and rehearse the new reason to leave the nest up that they chose from the Pale Male: Class Notes before writing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing fluency: (Using Sentence Frames) Provide the sentence frame "I think people should______" for students to write their new opinion statement. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with strategy development: (Using an Editing Checklist) Mark with a sticky note places in students' writing where they might consider revising. (MMAE)

B. Engaging the Writer: "Take the Nest Down!" Sign (20 minutes)

  • Invite students to close their notebook and stand for a quick round of Bird Simon Says.
  • Have students take a seat and display the Pale Male: Class Notes.
  • Remind them that in the previous lesson, they made a sign to show the most important reason to leave Pale Male's nest up.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

"I can create a sign with an illustration and a reason to support an opinion."

  • Tell students that today they will create a sign that supports the opinion to take Pale Male's nest down.
  • Tell students that they should look for the reason they find most compelling.
  • Review the definition of compelling (powerful and convincing).
  • Follow the same routine from Work Time A of Lesson 7 to guide students through creating their sign:
    • Read through the list of reasons in the Pale Male: Class Notes.
    • Invite students to turn and talk to choose the most compelling reason.
    • Distribute crayons.
    • Invite students to record their reason on the "Take the Nest Down!" Sign template on page 5 of their Pale Male research notebook.
    • Invite students to add an illustration that shows their reason.
    • Circulate to support students as they write and draw.
  • When 1 minute remains, give students a warning to finish up their writing and drawing.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with organizing ideas for written expression: (Verbal Writing Practice) Allow students to discuss and rehearse the reason to leave the nest up that they chose from the Pale Male: Class Notes before writing. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Focus students on the unit guiding question at the top of the Pale Male: Class Notes and read it aloud:
    • "Why do people have different opinions about birds?"
  • Turn and Talk:

"Think about our work with Pale Male and the two-voice poem. Why do people have different opinions about birds?" (Some people think they should feed the birds, and others do not think they should feed the birds.)

Conversation Cue: "How does our discussion add to your understanding of the guiding question? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • Call on a few volunteers to share out with the class.
  • Tell students that they will be able to share their real opinion about Pale Male in a couple of days!
  • For ELLs: (Sharing What a Partner Said) Invite a student to share what his or her partner said during the Turn and Talk.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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