Analyze a Model Whole-Book Literary Summary | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M3:U1:L8

Analyze a Model Whole-Book Literary Summary

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RL.8.1, RL.8.2

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.8.3, RL.8.4, RL.8.10, L.8.4

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can track characters, plot, and emerging themes in Maus I. (RL.8.2)
  • I can identify characteristics of an effective whole-book literary summary. (RL.8.1, RL.8.2)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket
  • Work Time A: Gist on sticky notes
  • Closing and Assessment A: Analyze a model whole-book literary summary (RL.8.1, RL.8.2)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - RL.8.2 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read Maus I, Chapter 5 (15 minutes)

B. Track Gist, Plot, Character, and Theme: Maus I, Chapter 5 - RL.8.2 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Analyze a Model Whole-Book Literary Summary - RL.8.2 (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text: Students preread chapter 6 in Maus I in preparation for reading the chapter in the next lesson.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • RL.8.2 – Opening A: Students write the central idea of a book they have read independently.
  • RL.8.2 – Work Time B: Students track the gist, plot, character, and theme of chapter 5 of Maus I.
  • RL.8.2 – Closing and Assessment A: Students study a model summary and brainstorm the components of an effective whole-book literary summary, noting how an effective summary begins with the central idea, uses concise details to explain it, and ends with a theme statement.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Students may practice writing a literary summary of an independent reading book using the criteria generated in this lesson. Students can share their summaries in small groups or with the whole class.
  • To increase the level of challenge in Closing and Assessment A, before sharing the model whole-book summary with students, invite them to write their own summary of Summer of the Mariposas. Students can then compare their summaries with each other, or check their work against the model once it is presented.
  • To help students navigate the potentially sensitive topics in chapter 5 of Maus I (suicide and its effect on the family), invite students to spend time reflecting in writing or discussion on how they practiced habits of character while reading this chapter.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In previous modules, students wrote literary summaries of chapters of a novel and nonfiction summaries of informational texts. This lesson expands this work to include a literary summary of an entire book. Students will analyze a model summary of Summer of the Mariposas from Module 1.
  • Students will also continue to track the gist, plot, and theme of Maus I through an analysis of chapter 5.

Support All Students

  • Presenting learning targets in writing, orally, and if possible, accompanied by symbols will help students to understand the language within them. ▲
  • Note that chapter 5 of Maus I depicts Art in bed with a romantic partner and brings up potentially sensitive topics such as Anja’s suicide, Vladek’s emotional response at her funeral, and the graphic depiction of Art’s thoughts of his mother’s suicide. Additionally, this chapter visually depicts Nazis killing children by slamming their bodies against walls and describes Tosha using poison to commit suicide and to kill Richieu and two other children before the Gestapo can take them to the gas chambers. Allow for time to process and respond to these topics during individual, small group, or full class discussion, and reach out to families as needed. Note that reading about these experiences might be a different experience for different students and expect varying levels of maturity from students in approaching this content. Use thoughtful strategic pairing for discussions concerning these topics to ensure that all students feel comfortable.
  • Students may need additional support with collaborating with their peers for the jigsaw in Work Time B. Some students may struggle to share their ideas in their groups. Consider predetermined grouping to place struggling students in groups with the most peer support. ▲
  • During Think-Pair-Share and Jigsaw protocols, pair ELLs with partners and groups who have more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames, for example. ▲

Assessment Guidance

  • Check student vocabulary logs for accountability in recording vocabulary.
  • Check gist statements to ensure students are recording quick notes about what the text is mostly about.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will finish reading Maus I and continue tracking gist, plot, character, and theme. Students will also plan a whole-book summary of Maus I in preparation for the end of unit assessment.

In Advance

  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 8.
  • Distribute Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 8 on each student's desk. As they enter the classroom, invite them to complete their entrance ticket.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.C.11 and 8.I.C.12.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson follows a similar pattern to earlier lessons; students engage in supported reading of Maus I, chapter 5, and then track and discuss theme in the novel. Students will also analyze a model whole-text summary and consider the difference between fiction and nonfiction summaries and chapter and whole-text summaries. This work will help to prepare students for the End of Unit 1 Assessment, in which they will write a summary of Maus I.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to identify differences between different types of summaries. Encourage them to rely on the criteria provided, and help them to notice specific examples within the model.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Text Guide: Maus I (for teacher reference) (from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time C)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)
  • Gist, Plot, Character, and Emerging Theme anchor chart (answers for teacher reference) (from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 4, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Gist, Plot, Character, and Emerging Theme anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 4, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Maus I (text; one per student; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Holocaust Glossary (one per student; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 3, Work Time A)
  • Summarize a Literary Text rubric (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time C)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Criteria for an Effective Whole-Book Literary Summary anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Criteria for an Effective Whole-Book Literary Summary anchor chart (one for display)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 8 (one per student)
  • Synopsis: Maus I, Chapter 5 (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (one per student)
  • Model Whole-Book Literary Summary: Summer of the Mariposas (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner - RL.8.2 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 8.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as the previous lessons to review the learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

For Lighter Support

  • N/A

For Heavier Support

  • After students have completed their entrance tickets, display the summary from Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 8 (answers for teacher reference). Call on a student volunteer to read the summary aloud and then give students 30 seconds to identify characteristics of an effective summary that appear in this example. As time allows, give students time to revise their own summaries, as needed, based on what they may have learned by viewing and discussing the example.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Read Maus I, Chapter 5 (15 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same process as with previous lessons for students to read chapter 5 of Maus I, using the Text Guide: Maus I (for teacher reference). Instruct students to read the chapter independently, and support struggling students as needed. Remind students that they can refer to their Holocaust Glossary if they encounter domain-specific vocabulary they do not understand. If students do not finish reading the chapter within the allotted reading time, distribute Synopsis: Maus I, Chapter 5 to each student to review the key details from the chapter. Then have students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary, reflect on their reading as they choose, and record the gist on sticky notes using the following resources as appropriate: vocabulary logs and Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart.
  • Gist: Vladek uses money and connections to hide from the Gestapo and stay alive.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"How does Vladek respond to Anja's suicide?" (He is very emotional and cries over her casket.)

"Reread page 103. What does Art think caused Anja's suicide? How does he feel about his mother's suicide?" (She had menopausal depression, she was depressed from the Holocaust, or she was selfish; he compares his pain to being imprisoned for his own murder.)

"Reread page 109. Why do you think Tosha decides to poison herself, Richieu, Bibi, and Lonia?" (She doesn't want them to go to the gas chambers and is too proud to die that way.)

"What examples of habits of character were evident in chapter 5 of Maus I?" (Answers will vary, but may note how although Anja and Vladek keep experiencing losses, they persevere and find a bunker to hide in.)

"What habits of character did you practice while reading and discussing chapter 5 of Maus I?" (Answers will vary, but may mention that they practiced using empathy as they discussed and read about the losses Vladek experienced and respect as they deepened their understanding of the inhumane experiences Jewish people endured during the Holocaust.)

For Lighter Support

  • After Work Time A, to help students prepare for their analysis of the model whole-text summary, ask students to write a short summary of Maus I, chapter 5, that students can then use as a point of comparison to notice similarities and differences between summaries of shorter excerpts of text and entire books.

For Heavier Support

  • After Work Time A, to help students prepare for their analysis of the model whole-text summary, review the Synopsis: Maus I, Chapter 5, together as a class so that students can use it as a point of comparison to notice similarities and differences between summaries of shorter excerpts of text and entire books. Have students work in small groups to find the criteria for an effective summary present in the shorter summary.

B. Track Gist, Plot, Character, and Theme: Maus I, Chapter 5 - RL.8.2 (15 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can track characters, plot, and emerging themes in Maus I."

  • Display the Gist, Plot, Character, and Emerging Theme anchor chart.
  • Prompt students to Think-Pair-Share:

"What is the gist of chapter 5?"

"What are the key events that happened in the plot in Maus I, chapter 5?"

"What have we learned about the development of characters in this chapter? In this chapter, for the first time, we see Vladek in despair. How does this add to our understanding of his character?"

"Yesterday, we began to discuss some emerging themes around perseverance and the will to survive, family ties, and the importance of remembering. Based on what we learned today, how might we add to or revise these emerging themes?"

  • Cold-call students to share out and add to the key plot elements section of the anchor chart. Refer to the Gist, Plot, Character, and Emerging Theme anchor chart (for teacher reference) as needed, and clarify any misconceptions.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time B, print an enlarged-text version of the model summary and cut each sentence into strips. Distribute scrambled strips to groups of students, and invite them to reassemble the summary. When groups have finished, display the summary intact, and allow them to compare their work. This will help draw students' attention to individual sentences within the summary and engage them in a process of analysis that will deepen their understanding of the criteria for an effective whole-book summary.

For Heavier Support

  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Analyze a Model Whole-Book Literary Summary - RL.8.2 (10 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can identify characteristics of an effective whole-book literary summary."

  • Remind students that they wrote literary and nonfiction summaries in Module 1. In the past, they have written summaries about chapters or excerpts from a book. Now they will look at a model literary summary of an entire book to determine the criteria of an effective whole-book literary summary.
  • Direct students to Turn and Talk about the following questions:

"What might be some of the similarities between a chapter summary and a whole-book summary?" (Answers will vary but may include the following: they outline what the text is about, state the central idea in the beginning, includes key details, ends with theme statement.)

"What might be some of the differences between a chapter summary and a whole-book summary?" (Answers will vary but may include the following: includes central idea of the entire book, includes major details of the entire book, not just a chapter or section, includes a theme statement developed throughout the book.)

  • Instruct students to retrieve the Summarize a Literary Text rubric. Provide time for students to review the rubric silently or in pairs. Instruct students to use this rubric to ensure their summary plan proficiently includes the criteria of an effective literary summary.
  • Distribute the Model Whole-Book Literary Summary: Summer of the Mariposas.
  • Invite students to read the model aloud chorally.
  • Display the Criteria for an Effective Whole-Book Literary Summary anchor chart. Cover up the bottom portion that lists the criteria until students have identified them.
  • Have students Think-Pair-Share, leaving adequate time for each partner to think and for each to share about the following question:

"Based on this first read, what are some of the key characteristics of an effective literary summary of an entire book?" (Answers will vary.)

  • After students share out some characteristics, reveal the criteria list on the bottom of the anchor chart.
  • Tell students they will now look for evidence of each criterion.
  • Read through each part of the summary and invite students to Think-Pair-Share about which criterion is addressed by each part of the summary.
  • As students share out, capture their responses on the Criteria for an Effective Whole-Book Literary Summary anchor chart. If desired, annotate the summary with a corresponding code for each criterion (e.g., I for introduction). Refer to the Criteria for an Effective Whole-Book Literary Summary anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Remind students that when writing paragraphs such as a summary, they should write in complete sentences.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

Homework

Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text

  • Students preread chapter 6 in Maus I in preparation for reading the chapter in the next lesson.

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