Write a Compare and Contrast Essay: Draft the Introduction | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M1:U3:L7

Write a Compare and Contrast Essay: Draft the Introduction

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • W.8.2a, W.8.5

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.8.1, RL.8.3, RL.8.9, RI.8.1, W.8.4, W.8.6, W.8.9, W.8.10, SL.8.1, L.8.5b, L.8.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can draft an introduction to a compare and contrast essay that includes a strong focus statement. (W.8.2a, W.8.4)
  • I can give kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my partner. (W.8.5, SL.8.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket (W.8.2a)
  • Work Time A: Language Dive: Compare and Contrast Model Essay Focus Statement (W.8.2a, W.8.4, L.8.5b)
  • Work Time C: Draft of Introduction (RL.8.9, W.8.2a, W.8.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.8.2a (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Language Dive: Focus Statement - W.8.2a (10 minutes)

B. Analyze the Model and Plan an Introduction - W.8.2a (10 minutes)

C. Draft an Introduction - W.8.2a (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair-Share - W.8.5 (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text: Students should preread chapter 21 of Summer of the Mariposas in preparation for studying an excerpt from the chapter in the next lesson.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.8.2a – Opening A: Students analyze how an author introduced a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow.
  • W.8.2a – Work Time A: Students participate in a Language Dive, analyzing how an author introduced a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow, and begin to plan their own focus statement that will do the same.
  • W.8.5 – Work Time B: Students develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning their focus statement.
  • W.8.2.a – Work Time C: Students practice introducing a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow, by drafting their introduction paragraphs
  • W.8.5 – Closing and Assessment A – Students develop and strengthen their writing with the support of peer feedback and revisions.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Gather a number of new texts with effective introductory paragraphs. Invite students to analyze these introductory paragraphs written by professionals to gather more criteria for an effective introductory paragraph.
  • If students are identifying the parts of their introductory paragraphs and planning them with ease, draw their attention to specific sentences within the paragraphs and ask what the roles of the sentences are and what effect there would be in removing those sentences, as is shown in Work Time A.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the previous lesson, students analyzed the structure of the model essay using the Painted Essay® template. Today, students will apply what they know about the Painted Essay® to plan and draft their La Llorona essays.

Support All Students

  • In Work Time A, B, and C, use strategic grouping during the Language Dive to form small groups of students who share the same home language, with one or more proficient native English speaking students added to each group to create a balance and range of similar and diverse perspectives on the structure of the English language.
  • Students may need additional support planning their introductory paragraphs. Group those students and guide their discussion to give context to the reader about La Llorona and the modernization of folklore.

Assessment Guidance

  • Throughout Work Time A, frequently review student work to ensure they are creating strong focus statements that accurately respond to the prompt. Use common issues as whole group teaching points.
  • Throughout Work Time B, circulate to monitor students’ planning skills on the Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer. If necessary, collect this organizer to provide feedback to students who may need it before the following lesson.
  • Throughout Work Time B and C, frequently review student work to ensure they are creating strong plans and drafts for their essays that align with the Painted Essay® structure. Use common issues as whole group teaching points.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will plan and draft Proof Paragraph 1 of their essays, drawing on the work they did in planning their introduction, especially their focus statement.

In Advance

  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7.
  • Review the Compare and Contrast Painted Essay(r) anchor chart (for teacher reference) to become familiar with what will be required of students over the remainder of the unit.
  • Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the language goals suggested under each sentence chunk strip (see Materials list). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet students' needs.
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list). 

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous units to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.B.6, 8.I.B.7, 8.I.B.8, 8.IC.10, 8.I.C.11, and 8.I.C.12.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson provides students with an in-depth look at the focus statement of Model Essay: "Peuchen" during a Language Dive and subsequent time spent applying new understanding about the structure and content of focus statements directly to writing. Following the Language Dive, students will plan and draft an introduction, including a focus statement, for the compare and contrast La Llorona essay, supported by a graphic organizer.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to produce clear and cohesive focus statements and may need continued reminders about essential information and structure when drafting introductions. Additionally, ELLs may struggle to put their ideas into words. To aid this process, encourage students to "work backward" on their graphic organizers, using proof paragraph main ideas to guide the construction of focus statements and the rest of the introduction.

Vocabulary

  • introduction, focus statement (A)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 3, Lesson 6, Work Time A
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 4, Opening B)
  • Academic word wall (from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Compare and Contrast La Llorona note-catcher (for teacher reference) (from Unit 3, Lesson 4, Work Time B)

  • Compare and Contrast La Llorona sample student response (for teacher reference) (from Unit 3, Lesson 4, Teaching Notes)
  • Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart (example for teacher reference; from Unit 3, Lesson 6, Work Time A) 
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)

  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Online or print dictionaries (including ELL and home language dictionaries)
  • Model Essay: “Peuchen” (from Unit 3, Lesson 6, Work Time A)
  • Compare and Contrast La Llorona note-catcher (from Unit 3, Lesson 4, Work Time B)
  • Painted Essay® template (from Unit 3, Lesson 6, Work Time A)
  • Summer of the Mariposas (text; from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • La Llorona by Joe Hayes (from Unit 3, Lesson 3, Work Time A)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 (answers for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive Guide: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
  • Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer (for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 (one per student)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 sentence chunk strips (one per pair of students)
  • Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer (one per student and one for display)
  • Word processor (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening
  • A. Engage the Learner – W.8.2a (5 minutes)
  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7.
  • Once all students are ready, invite students to share responses to the prompt from their entrance ticket. Turn and Talk:

“What are the elements of an effective introduction?” (Responses may include the following: “The elements of an effective introductory paragraph are an introduction that catches the reader’s attention and gives context and a focus statement that answers the prompt clearly, naming the similarities and differences [between the monster in the folklore and the way the author modernized it].)

  • Display Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart.
  • As students share, capture their responses on the Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart.
  • Confirm the correct answers and explain while using the descriptions in parentheses above.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine to focus students on the terms introduction (the part of an essay that opens a piece of writing and helps the reader understand what the writing will be about) and focus statement (a sentence that tells the main points of an essay) in the learning targets and to use a dictionary to define the word. With students’ support, record the meanings of the terms on the academic word wall. Invite students to record the terms in their vocabulary logs. 
  • Students may also use the vocabulary strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart to deconstruct each term and add any relevant notes to the vocabulary strategies on this chart.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Language Dive: Focus Statement – W.8.2a (10 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can draft an introduction to a compare and contrast essay that includes a strong focus statement.”(RL.8.9, W.8.2a, W.8.4)

  • Tell students they will now participate in a Language Dive to explore the meaning and structure of a focus statement in the Compare and Contrast Model Essay.
  • Remind students of their prompt: 

“What about the La Llorona from folklore of Latin American has Guadalupe Garcia McCall kept the same and what has she modernized in Summer of the Mariposas? Why?”

  • Reread aloud paragraph 1 of Model Essay: “Peuchen.”
  • Focus students on the sentence:
    • In the new scene I have written for Summer of the Mariposas modernizing the Peuchen, I have maintained many characteristics of the original “monster” so that it is recognizable, but I have modernized the tale by writing in two Peuchens, a brother and sister, to illustrate the theme that things are not always as they appear.
  • Use the Language Dive Guide: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 (for teacher reference) to guide students through a Language Dive conversation about the sentence. Distribute and display the Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 note-catcher, and the Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 sentence chunk strips.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

B. Analyze the Model and Plan an Introduction – W.8.2a (10 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can draft an introduction to a compare and contrast essay that includes a strong focus statement.”

  • Distribute the Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer.
  • Display and invite students to retrieve the Model Essay: “Peuchen.” Explain to students that they will first analyze the introductory paragraph of the model essay to help them plan the introductory paragraph for their La Llorona essays. 
  • Using the Painted Essay® template, invite students to work in pairs to discuss how the author caught the reader’s attention, provided context or background information about the topic, and introduced the two points they will support in the rest of the essay. 
  • Think-Pair-Share:

“How did the author capture the reader’s attention?” (The author highlights the meaningfulness and relevance of folklore stories in modern day literature.)

“How did the author provide context and background information?” (The author provides information about the original Peuchen from folklore of Latin America.)

  • Remind students that they have already reviewed the elements of a strong focus statement in their Language Dive.
  • Remind students that as they plan their introductory paragraphs, they should provide relevant and concise context in order for the reader to understand their topic. Ask students to refer to their notes from the activity they did on entering class.
  • Invite students to retrieve the following materials:

    • Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer 
    • Compare and Contrast La Llorona note-catcher 
    • Painted Essay® template
  • Tell students they are now ready to plan the introductory paragraph of their La Llorona essays. Explain that in this lesson, they are planning and drafting their introduction, and they will draft their Proof Paragraphs in future lessons.
  • Recommend students orally recount their focus statement, context, and main points with a partner before adding these to their Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer.
  • Guide students to refer back to the practice portion of the Language Dive: Model Essay: “Peuchen,” Paragraph 1 note-catcher while planning their focus statements.
  • Circulate to support students as they plan and to identify common issues to use as whole group teaching points. Students may reference Summer of the Mariposas and La Llorona by Joe Hayes.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time B, cut the elements of the introduction of the Model Essay: "Peuchen" into strips of paper. Students can glue each element to the appropriate place on a separate copy of the Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer to activate and reinforce their thinking about both the topic and structure before using this same graphic organizer to plan their own introductions.

For Heavier Support

  • Prepare a sample prefilled Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer in advance of Work Time B, based on the Model Essay: "Peuchen" and distribute to students to use as an example.
  • In Work Time B, help students to generate ideas as they plan their introductions by providing written examples of the types of information that can go in the introduction of an essay to grab the reader's attention. These might include a short summary of the topic, an interesting fact or feature about the monster students are comparing and contrasting depictions of, or a general statement about Latin American folklore. 

C. Draft an Introduction – W.8.2a (10 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can draft an introduction to a compare and contrast essay that includes a strong focus statement.”

  • Distribute word processors to students so that they may type their essays.
  • Guide students through drafting their introductions. 
  • Refer to Compare and Contrast La Llorona sample student response (for teacher reference) for sample response.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to write their introductions. Students will each be writing their own essays, but may work in pairs to support one another. Refer students to the Model Essay: “Peuchen,” the Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart, and the Compare and Contrast Informative Writing Plan graphic organizer for the La Llorona essay to write their introductions.
  • Circulate and support students, prompting them to identify the context and main points in their introduction.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Pair-Share – W.8.5 (10 mins)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can give kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my partner.”

  • Invite student pairs to pair up with another pair to share their introductions and provide feedback against relevant criteria on the Compare and Contrast Painted Essay® anchor chart. Ask for a volunteer pair to model this exchange, using prompts such as the following:

“How did you catch the reader’s attention?” 

“What is your focus statement and how do you plan on supporting it?” 

  • Focus students on the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart and remind them of the habit of character recorded: respect, as students are sharing out their planning work and developing their understanding of the task.
  • Invite pairs to begin discussion with each other. Circle and monitor the discussions to ensure each student shares their hook, context, and focus statement. 
  • Invite students to revise their Introductions based on feedback they receive.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson in their work to be respectful partners, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

Homework

Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text

  • Students should preread chapter 21 of Summer of the Mariposas in preparation for studying an excerpt from the chapter in the next lesson.

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