Write a Narrative: Plan Plot | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M1:U2:L9

Write a Narrative: Plan Plot

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • W.8.3a, W.8.3e, W.8.5

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • W.8.10, SL.8.1, L.8.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can plan the plot of my new scene for Summer of the Mariposas that results in the same outcome as the original scene. (W.8.3a, W.8.3e)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket (W.8.3a)
  • Work Time C: Storyboard graphic organizer (W.8.3a, W.8.3e)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Model: Plan Plot - W.8.3a (10 minutes)

B. Partner Share: Plan Plot - W.8.3e (10 minutes)

C. Practice: Plan Plot - W.8.5 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair-Share - SL.8.1 (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Text-Dependent Questions: Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about the plots in Summer of the Mariposas.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.8.3a – Work Time C: Students will plan the plot of their narratives by outlining the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. This will prepare students to engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters and to organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
  • W.8.3.e – Work Time C: Students will plan the plot of their narratives by outlining the resolution. This will prepare students to provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.
  • W.8.5 – Work Time C: Students will practice developing and strengthening writing as needed by planning the plot of their narratives.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • In Work Time B, students may identify the rising action, climax or turning point, falling action, and resolution in the model narrative on their own. Ask volunteers to share their responses with the class.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In previous lessons, students read chapters 1–16 of Summer of the Mariposas. Students analyzed the point of view of the characters, figurative language, and themes in the story. Students also analyzed a model narrative to generate characteristics of a quality story. Students researched monsters from Latin American folklore and created the character profile of their monster and setting of their own original scene for Summer of the Mariposas. Students will use their ideas for their introduction and to plan the plot of their narrative.

Support All Students

  • Students may need additional support with understanding the headings and questions in the Storyboard graphic organizer. Spend time having students paraphrase questions in their own words to check for understanding.
  • Note there is a differentiated version of the Storyboard graphic organizer used in Work Time A in the supporting materials download.
  • Students may need additional support with putting their ideas into writing. Sit with those students who require additional support with writing to help them actualize their ideas.
  • Students may draw visuals in the storyboard to plan the plot elements: rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Students may use text and visuals or just text in their storyboards to brainstorm their ideas for their narrative.

Assessment Guidance

  • Review students’ notebooks from Work Time B to ensure students understand how to use descriptive and figurative language to introduce the character profile and setting of their narrative.
  • Monitor students during the planning of pacing activity to ensure that they are finding moments in their plot to add action words. If necessary, collect this organizer to provide feedback to students who may need it before the following lesson.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will edit their narratives to adjust the pacing of the action in their plot. Students will plan where to add action and where to move the plot along. Students will also learn to use dialogue and transition words in preparation for their narrative writing.
  • Students will use their plan to draft their narratives in Lesson 11.

In Advance

  • Prepare the following: 
    • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 9
    • Storyboard graphic organizer model (for display)
  • Strategically pair students for partner work in Work Time B.
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 9 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols; to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.A.1, 8.I.A.4, 8.I.B.6, 8.I.8.7, 8.I.B.8, 8.II.A.1, and 8.II.B.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson provides a clear, guided process for mapping out plot in students’ narrative planning. The pair work built into the lesson is an opportunity for sharing and processing around narrative plot that will help ELLs, in particular, to receive essential input from peers as they work toward the narrative writing task on the end of unit assessment. This pair work will also provide an opportunity for ELLs to hear and see others’ narrative plot planning, and these models can inform the revisions and ongoing improvements that ELLs will make to their own Storyboard graphic organizer .
  • ELLs may find it challenging to organize their ideas into a clear timeline while planning out plot progression in their narrative. Encourage students to act out and sketch ideas while brainstorming independently and in pairs to gain clarity around their vision of how the story will unfold before trying to capture it in writing on their Storyboard graphic organizer.

Vocabulary

  • climax, falling action, resolution, rising action (DS)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Domain-specific word wall (one for display; Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Summer of the Mariposas (text; one per student; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time C)
  • Character and Setting planner (one per student; from Unit 2, Lesson 8, Work Time C)
  • Model Narrative: "Peuchen" (one per student; from Unit 2, Lesson 6, Work Time A)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Storyboard graphic organizer (example for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 9 (one per student)
  • Storyboard graphic organizer (one per student and one for display)
  • Storyboard graphic organizer  
  • Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot (one per student; in Unit 2 Homework Resources)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 9.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons.

For Lighter Support

  • N/A

For Heavier Support

  • Invite students to turn to an elbow partner and paraphrase their understanding of the learning target in one minute or less. Have them share out and give them feedback on their language use and the accuracy of the paraphrase. Then, invite them to turn to their partner and paraphrase once again, this time in 30 seconds or less. Repeat the feedback process. Write the definitions of plot and outcome on the board, based on what students have shared, and review together as a class to ensure understanding. Leave these definitions visible for the remainder of the lesson to serve as additional support for students during the remainder of the lesson.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Model: Plan Plot – W.8.3a (10 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can plan the plot of my new scene for Summer of the Mariposas that results in the same outcome as the original scene.”

  • Invite students to retrieve Model Narrative: “Peuchen” and to skim to briefly reread. Remind students in the previous lesson they planned their character profile and settings and invite them to retrieve their Character and Setting planner to review their plans, particularly where in the book this will happen.
  • Remind students of the question they responded to on Entrance Ticket Unit 2, Lesson 9, as they entered the classroom:
    • Using your character profile and setting, decide how the monster in your narrative will encounter the Garza sisters. (Responses may vary.)
  • Display and distribute Storyboard graphic organizer. Tell students that narratives often follow a similar predictable pattern as outlined on the organizer. Direct students to Turn and Talk with a partner about the graphic organizer. Have students read a section of the graphic organizer and talk to their partner about their experience with this aspect of narrative writing and any questions they have about it. Then, review each of the sections of the graphic organizer to help students understand how each piece builds the plot, and answer any questions that have come up. For ELLs and students who require additional support, the Storyboard graphic organizer can be used to help guide students’ thinking through the use of graphic representation of dramatic structure and definitions of key terms related to plot that appear in the organizer.
  • With students’ support, record the meanings of vocabulary words in the Storyboard (rising action—the incident that builds tension right before the climax; climax—turning point in a story; falling action—consequences or results of the climax; resolution—how the conflict is solved) on the domain-specific word wall, with translations in students’ home languages. Write synonyms or sketch a visual above each key term to scaffold students’ understanding. Invite students to record these words in their vocabulary logs.
  • Consider mapping this out on the board at the same time using a line chart to visually depict the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.
  • At the end of the organizer, focus students on the Resolution section and read aloud the questions. Invite students to refer to their Character and Setting planner to review where in the book they decided their new scene should be inserted. Think-Pair-Share:

“What happens at the beginning of the next chapter? Where are the girls in the next chapter?” (Student responses will vary.)

“How will this impact your resolution?” (Student responses will vary, but may include they need to make sure that the resolution sets the girls up to be in the right place and the right circumstances ready for the next chapter.)

  • Model completing the Resolution row with the model narrative.
  • Ensure students understand the space in the first column of the Storyboard graphic organizer underneath the questions is for a quick sketch and the second column is for some brief notes.
  • Remind students that on the completed Character and Setting: Peuchen, the author of the model narrative said the new scene was to go between Chapters 12 and 13. Remind students this means that the end of the new scene needs to lead seamlessly into Chapter 13.
  • Invite students to read the last two paragraphs of the model narrative leading right into the first paragraph of Chapter 13 in Summer of the Mariposas. Invite students to Turn and Talk:

“How does the model narrative end?” (With Odilia reflecting on the behavior of the monsters.)

“How does this scene flow seamlessly into Chapter 13?” (At the end of the new scene, the girls are looking for the path in the dark. At the beginning of Chapter 13, they are doing the same thing.)

  • Complete the Resolution boxes on the displayed Storyboard graphic organizer. See the Storyboard graphic organizer (example for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to complete the Resolution row of their Storyboard graphic organizers by reading the first paragraph of the next section of Summer of the Mariposas after their scene and discussing with a partner before recording. Ask questions to guide thinking:

“What happens at the end of your scene? How do they get away from the monster?”

“How do the girls get from the end of your scene to the beginning of the next?”

  • Refocus the group. Start from the beginning of the displayed Storyboard graphic organizer, and using the questions on each row, invite students to refer to the model narrative and help briefly map out the model narrative on the organizer, clarifying the meaning of any unknown words or phrases on the organizer. Add quick sketches and notes as a model for students for how to complete their organizers. See the Storyboard graphic organizer (example for teacher reference).

For Lighter Support

  • During Work Time A, review the definitions of underlined words on the Storyboard graphic organizer ▲ as a class before beginning planning. Invite students to take turns paraphrasing each definition with a partner.

B. Partner Share: Plan Plot - W.8.3e (10 minutes)

  • Give students 3 minutes to think in silence about how they would organize events in their narratives on their Storyboard graphic organizers. During this thinking time, invite students to sketch in the first column, but discourage them from writing anything in the second column at this point. Help students understand that sometimes thinking backwards can be helpful in terms of making sure they arrive at the resolution that will move seamlessly into the novel.
  • Refocus the group and invite students to talk through each row of their storyboard organizers with their partner. Provide the guidance that one partner should talk through their entire narrative for 3 minutes before moving on to the next.

For Heavier Support

  • During Work Time A, have students complete the Storyboard graphic organizer ▲ in its entirety based on the model narrative in pairs before beginning to fill out the information for their own narratives. Working backwards in this way will help students dissect how the author of the model narrative has woven essential components into the essay and help students to connect the planning they will do on the graphic organizer to the writing they will do while executing their narratives. 

C. Practice: Plan Plot - W.8.5 (15 minutes)

  • Once students have talked through their ideas, invite them to map out their ideas on the Storyboard graphic organizer. Remind students that equally as important as ensuring the end of the narrative flows seamlessly back into the novel is making sure that the novel flows into the beginning of the narrative.
  • Set a timer for 3 minutes intervals and remind students to move on to the next row of their graphic organizer each time the timer sounds.
  • Circulate to support students as they plan. Look for students who are creating a scene that won't fit into the novel. Look also for students who are moving action too quickly, so, for example, an event that is significant enough to be the climax occurs too early in the narrative.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • At the end of Work Time C, revist the learning target and the definitions of plot and outcome. Ask students to reflect on the planning they did during Work Time B by writing their name on a sheet of paper with a smiley face indicating they feel confident that they met the target or a frown face if they feel they need help in reaching this goal. Offer extra support during the next lesson or outside of class to those students who report needing assistance in order to ensure adequate confidence and preparation for the end of unit assessment.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingLevels of Support

A. Pair-Share - SL.8.1 (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to share their Storyboards with their partner. Students may exchange graphic organizers or present the plot events to their partner. Circulate to support pairs as they share. If necessary, prompt by asking questions such as the following:

"What event is being described in this narrative?"

"What is the rising action of the story?"

"What is the climax or turning point of the scene?"

"What is the falling action of the story?"

"What is the outcome of the narrative?"

  • Prompt students to Pair-Share about what they observed in their partner's Storyboard:

"What is one strength of your partner's Storyboard?"

"What is one area of growth in your partner's Storyboard?"

  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

 

Homework

Homework

A. Text-Dependent Questions

  • Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about the plots in Summer of the Mariposas.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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