Write a Narrative: Analyze a Model | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G8:M1:U2:L6

Write a Narrative: Analyze a Model

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • W.8.3, W.8.4

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.8.2, RL.8.3, RI.8.1, RI.8.4, RI.8.10, W.8.10, SL.8.1, L.8.4, L.8.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze a model essay to determine criteria for narrative writing. (W.8.3, W.8.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket
  • Work Time C: Narrative Writing Checklist (W.8.3, W.8.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - SL.8.1 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Introduce the Model Narrative - W.8.3 (10 minutes)

B. Analyze a Model: Model the Checklist - W.8.4 (5 minutes)

C. Analyze a Model: Partner Work - W.8.3 (15 minutes)

D. Read "The Peuchen" (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflect on Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.8.3 – Work Time A: Students will work as a class or in small groups to read and analyze the model narrative. This will aid students in their ability to write narratives to develop their own real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • W.8.4 – Work Time B: Students will be introduced to a checklist for narrative writing that will prepare them to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.8.3 – Work Time C: Students will share their notices and identify specific characteristics of the model narrative that makes it an exemplary piece of writing and will add the specific criteria to their narrative checklists. This will aid students in their ability to write narratives to develop their own real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Students may research other literary and informational texts about the peuchen and analyze how this legend has changed over time.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • This lesson builds on students’ previous work in analyzing an exemplary work to identify characteristics to use in their own writing. Additionally, the analysis of themes in previous lessons prepares students to analyze how the author of the model narrative embeds themes in the writing.

Support All Students

  • In Work Time A, students may use an I Notice/I Wonder note-catcher to identify the characteristics of an effective narrative while reading the model narrative.
  • During Work Time B, while reading the model narrative for gist, encourage students to act out key sentences to enhance engagement and comprehension.
  • Note there is a differentiated version of the Narrative Writing checklist used in Work Time B in the separate Teacher's Guide for English Language Learners.
  • Students may need additional support reading the texts introduced in this lesson. Use strategic grouping to ensure those students who may find the text challenging because of unfamiliar vocabulary and structure can navigate the reading with support from highly proficient peers.
  • In Work Time D, remind students to apply strategies for determining the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary and determining gist.

Assessment Guidance

  • Work Time C: Monitor the notes students take on how the model meets the criteria. Take note of students who may need additional support in the future.

Down the Road

  • Students will write a new scene for Summer of the Mariposas in which they imagine the characters of the book encountering a modernized monster from Latin American folklore. 
  • Students analyze the structure and elements of a quality narrative in order to produce their own.

  • Students will use the narrative writing checklist when writing their narrative piece for the end of unit assessment. Students will also use the Storyboard graphic organizer to plan their own narratives.

In Advance

  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 6.
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 6 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.A.1, 8.I.A.4, 8.I.B.6, 8.I.B.7, 8.I.B.8, and 8.II.A.1.

  • Important Points in the Lesson Itself
  • To support ELLs, this lesson establishes an environment of respect for diverse perspectives through with academic mindsets, pairs students to work collaboratively, and allows time for discussion during each task. Ample time is dedicated to introducing narrative writing, the type of writing that students will engage in on the end of unit assessment, using a model piece of writing and an associated informational text, "The Peuchen."
  • ELLs may find it challenging to think deeply, at first, with both the model narrative and the informational text, "The Peuchen," because of the volume of potentially unfamiliar new language. Remind them of the strategies introduced in Unit 1 for approaching unfamiliar texts. Invite them to celebrate what they do understand. 

Vocabulary

  • criteria (A)

Key

(A): Academic-Specific Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 4, Opening B)
  • Academic word wall (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Performance Task anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time B; see the Module Overview page for the Performance Task download)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 6 (answers for teacher reference)
  • Narrative Writing checklist (example for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 6 (one per student)
  • Model Narrative: “Peuchen” (one per student)
  • Narrative Writing checklist (one per student and one for display)
  • Narrative Writing checklist  
  • “The Peuchen” (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - SL.8.1 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: As students arrive, invite them to complete Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 6.
  • Once all students are ready, invite volunteers to share their responses to the questions. Draw students' attention to the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart.
  • Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

"How do you think applying these habits of character might help others feel that they belong in this classroom? How do you think applying them might break down barriers in feeling a sense of belonging?" (Student responses will vary, but may include that showing respect, compassion, empathy will help others to feel seen and heard and therefore will make them feel they belong. Practicing these habits will also prevent them from behavior or actions that might make others feel they don't belong.)

  • Add this academic mindset to the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine to focus students on the word criteria (standards by which something is judged) and to use a dictionary to define the word or the vocabulary strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. With students' support, record the meaning of criteria on the academic word wall. Invite students to record the word in their vocabulary logs.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Introduce the Model Narrative - W.8.3 (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Performance Task anchor chart, and remind them they will be writing a narrative modernizing a monster from folklore of Latin America for a new scene in Summer of the Mariposas, in the style of Guadalupe Garcia McCall. 
  • Distribute Model Narrative: "Peuchen" to each student. Remind students that analyzing a model will help them write their own narrative.
  • Invite students to read the model narrative either silently or in pairs.
  • Tell students that when analyzing a model to generate criteria for an effective piece of writing, they need to read it closely. Remind students of the strategies on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart: reading for gist and determining the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to find the gist and to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Use total participation techniques to select students to share their gist statements with the whole group.
  • Gist: A peuchen visits the Garza girls in a cave and warns Odilia that the girls should flee. The peuchen's brother swoops down to attack the girls, but the first peuchen fights her brother while the girls escape.
  • N/A

B. Analyze a Model: Model the Checklist – W.8.4 (5 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can analyze a model essay to determine criteria for narrative writing.”

  • Distribute and display the Narrative Writing checklist. Tell students that this checklist will help them to ensure they have included everything necessary for an effective narrative as they write their own narratives. In the left-hand column are general characteristics of an effective narrative. Next to each characteristic is a space to record what this might look like for their narrative about a modernized monster. For ELLs and students who require additional support, the Narrative Writing checklist can be used for this activity to help guide students’ thinking. This resource includes supplementary information and is modified to focus student attention on finding concrete examples in the model in an effort to build understanding of each of these elements. 
  • Read the first criterion aloud for the group.
  • Model how to complete the first row of the Narrative Writing checklist using characteristics from the model. See Narrative Writing checklist (example for teacher reference). Note that the Narrative Writing Checklist is a consistent resource in all grades. Base the amount of detail needed in modeling this on students’ needs.
  • Direct students to Think-Pair-Share:

“Where do we see evidence of the second criterion in the model essay?” (The author names the sisters, describes the cave, and establishes that they are in a dangerous situation in the first few paragraphs.) What context might you need to establish when you write your own narratives? (Information about an original setting and how characters from Summer of the Mariposas engage with the environment.)

  • Invite students to record responses on row 2 of their Narrative Writing checklist.

For Heavier Support

  • In Work Time B, for a tactile alternative to using the differentiated note-catcher, cut characteristics from column 2 in the Narrative Writing checklist (for teacher reference) into strips and have students match each example to the appropriate characteristic in column 1. This will help to clarify the meaning of each characteristic if students are struggling to understand the description. To pull back on support, provide students with some, but not all of the characteristics in column B, and have them find the remaining ones in the Model Narrative: "Peuchen" themselves. Leave rows 6 and 7 (use of transition words) for students to complete themselves, as this will be an attainable task for students of all English language proficiency levels and will build background knowledge of the use of linking language in advance of continued work with transition words in Lesson 10.

C. Analyze a Model: Partner Work - W.8.3 (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to work in pairs to complete the remainder of the Narrative Writing checklist by analyzing the characteristics of the model.
  • Circulate, and support students as needed, prompting students to notice specific words and phrases from the text. Refer to the Narrative Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) to guide students.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • N/A

D. Read “The Peuchen” (5 minutes)

  • Display and distribute “The Peuchen.” Tell students that this is the informational text the author used to write the model narrative.
  • Invite students to read the text in their pairs, taking it in turns to read sentences aloud to each other, and then to record the gist underneath the text and determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Words that might be unfamiliar include the following:
    • hypnosis: a condition like sleep that is caused by the direction of another person
    • paralyzes: to take away the ability to move or feel in a part or parts of the body
    • shape-shifting: changes shape
  • Use total participation techniques to select students to share their gist statements with the whole group.
  • Gist: The Peuchen is a flying snake monster drains the blood of victims.
  • Direct students to Think-Pair-Share about the following questions:

“This is the text the author of the model narrative used. Where do you see evidence of this information in the model narrative?” (In the description of the monster and in the powers it has.)

“What is the same between the peuchen in the model narrative and the description of the peuchen in the informational text?” (Flying snake, hypnotizes, wants to drink blood.)

“How has the author of the model modernized the monster? How is it different in the narrative to the informational text?” (In the model narrative there two Peuchens—one is good and one is bad.)

“What are you thinking about with regards to your own narratives now?” (Student responses will vary, but may include thinking about how to make sure the essential characteristics of the monster they choose are still evident in the narrative.)

  • Tell students they will choose their monsters in the next lesson.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time D, have students sketch the traditional depiction of the Peuchen described in "The Peuchen" and the modernized version described in Model Narrative: "Peuchen" and compare the two drawings. This will help to illustrate the meaning of words, phrases, and sentences in each text, facilitating comprehension.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Reflect on Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.
  • Incorporate reflection on and awareness of the following academic mindsets: "I belong in this academic community," and "This work has value for me."
  • Ask students to Turn and Talk: 

"How did you contribute to this learning community today? How were the tasks you completed valuable to you?" (Possible responses: I shared my ideas with my classmate and helped him/her to notice things about the monster. I also have a better understanding of how to write a model narrative, which I will need to do soon.)

Homework

Homework

A. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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