Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” (Lessons 5-6) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1:L5

Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” (Lessons 5-6)

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RL.7.1, RL.7.2, RL.7.4, RL.7.7, L.7.5a, L.7.6

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.7.10

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in "Lift Every Voice and Sing." (RL.7.4, L.7.5)
  • I can compare and contrast the written version of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" to its audio version, analyzing the effects of techniques in each medium. (RL.7.7)
  • I can identify themes in "Lift Every Voice and Sing." (RL.7.2)
  • I can select a research reading text that I want to read.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lessons 5-6
  • Work Time A: Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (RL.7.1, RL.7.4, RL.7.7, RL.7.10, L.7.5a, L.7.6)
  • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 note-catcher (RL.7.2, RL.7.4, L.7.5)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (30 minutes)

B. Track Progress (10 minutes)

C. Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 - RL.7.4 (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Compare Lift Every Voice and Sing Statue to Poem - RL.7.2 (20 minutes)

B. Launch Independent Research Reading - RI.7.10 (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Build Background Knowledge: Read and Analyze Savage Biography. Students read Augusta Savage's biography and answer questions to build background knowledge of the artist and the context of the Harlem Renaissance.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal. 

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • RL.7.4 – Work Time B: Students track progress on their abilities to interpret figurative meanings and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning.
  • RL.7.4 – Work Time C: In a Language Dive, students explore a stanza from “Lift Every Voice and Sing” to better understand the meaning of figurative language.
  • RL.7.2 – Closing and Assessment A: Students analyze the sculpture version of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” and analyze the development of theme in the works.
  • RI.7.10 – Closing and Assessment B: Students launch their independent research reading, working to read and comprehend literary nonfiction proficiently.
  • For the mid-unit assessment in Work Time A of this lesson, students read the lyrics and listen to the song version of “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” analyzing the written version for figurative language and theme. (RL.7.1, RL.7.2, RL.7.4, L.7.5a). Next, students compare and contrast the written version to the audio version, analyzing the musical techniques and their effects. (RL.7.7)
  • Two lessons have been allocated for this assessment to ensure sufficient time for students to compare and contrast the written version of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” to the audio version and to the sculpture version and to build background knowledge on the artists of the Harlem Renaissance. If these are taught in two separate lessons rather than together as one block, revisit the learning targets and the task at the beginning of the second 45-minute lesson to remind students of the task and purpose.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is on becoming effective learners and ethical people. Students practice integrity and perseverance as they work independently on assessments and take responsibility as they assess their own work by tracking their progress on reading standards.
  • The Think-Pair-Share protocol is used in this lesson. Protocols are an important feature of our curriculum because they are one of the best ways to engage students in discussion, inquiry, critical thinking, and sophisticated communication. A protocol consists of agreed-upon, detailed guidelines for reading, recording, discussing, or reporting that ensure equal participation and accountability in learning.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • In Work Time A, students may want to read the poem silently and complete the mid-unit assessment and without any instruction. Release them to do this independently if they are ready for it.
  • In Work Time C, some students may have experience analyzing artwork. Invite these students to model how to interpret a sculpture, or ask them to lead a discussion on what the sculpture shows and what the details in the sculpture might mean in regard to theme.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the first half of this unit, students discovered the topic of the Harlem Renaissance. They read and analyzed how Shuffle Along’s songs, including “Election Day,” “Love Will Find a Way,” and “I’m Just Wild About Harry,” compare to their written versions. This lesson continues this comparison of written and audio versions in an assessment.

Support All Students

  • At this point, students should be reading the text independently. However, if some or all students need more support, read a stanza aloud and then release students to read independently, in pairs or small groups. Invite students who require the whole poem to be read aloud to sit in a group away from the rest of the students, so as not to be distracting. ▲
  • The subject matter in this poem includes a discussion of a “dark past,” “the chastening rod,” “hope unborn had died,” “the blood of the slaughtered,” “the gloomy past,” “weary years,” and “silent tears.” Continue to monitor students to determine if issues surface from the content of this poem that need to be discussed as a whole group, in smaller groups, or individually. To support students in processing this content, ask: “What habit of character did you use as you read and discussed this poem?” Students may need to draw on perseverance, empathy, and compassion as they read and discuss this content, being sensitive to their own and others’ reactions to the information presented.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment. ▲
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 30 minutes allotted. Provide time over multiple days if necessary. ▲

Assessment Guidance

  • All assessment materials (student prompt and teacher checklist) are included in the Assessment Overview and Resources.
  • When assessing and providing feedback on this assessment, use the answer key and sample student responses (see Assessment Overview and Resources) to help complete students’ Track Progress recording form.
  • In this assessment, students are tracking progress toward anchor standards:
    • R.1: By the end of Grade 12, I will be able to: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
    • R.4: By the end of Grade 12, I will be able to: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
    • R.10: By the end of Grade 12, I will be able to: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
    • L.4: By the end of Grade 12, I will be able to: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will read “Calling Dreams” and “Your World” by Georgia Douglas Johnson to identify themes, interpret figurative language, and analyze the structure.
  • Students’ Mid-Unit 1 Assessments will be returned in Lesson 11 with feedback.

In Advance

  • Prepare Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lessons 5-6 at each student's workspace. 
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Set up a device to play the audio recording of "Lift Every Voice and Sing": http://eled.org/0215.
  • Work Time A: Students complete assessments online using a platform such as http://eled.org/0189 or http://eled.org/0158 or using speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or using an app or software such as http://eled.org/0103.
  • Work Time A: Students can use print or online dictionaries (including ELL and home language dictionaries) during designated items in Part I.
  • Work Time C: Display The Harp (http://eled.org/0203), also known as Lift Every Voice and Sing, with a projector.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 7.I.A.1, 7.I.B.5, 7.I.B.6, 7.I.B.8, 7.I.C.10, and 7.I.C.12.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, the assessment in this lesson consists of tasks and questions in the same format as the activities students have completed throughout the unit thus far. This gradual release supports students in independent achievement on this assessment.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to write a constructed response independently even with all the practice on similar tasks throughout the unit. Remind students that they have successfully completed similar activities in class, and encourage them to do their best. Also, encourage them to try to recall sentence frames they have been given throughout the unit for similar responses. Help students be mindful of the amount of time they spend on each task.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Academic word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Domain-specific word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time B)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, Work Time A)
  • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3, Opening B)
  • Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, Work Time A)
  • Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 3, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Techniques anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Module 2 End of Unit 3 Assessments with feedback (one per student; from Module 2, Unit 3, Lessons 12-13, Work Time A)
  • Vocabulary log (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Track Progress folders (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 15-16, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (answers for teacher reference) (see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Audio recording of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (one per class; see http://eled.org/0215)
  • Language Dive Guide: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 Sentence Chunk Chart (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
  • Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Image of The Harp sculpture (one for display; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Techniques anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Independent Reading Sample Plans (for teacher reference) (optional; see the Tools Page)
  • Unit 1 Homework Resources (for families)
  • Homework: Read and Analyze Savage Biography (answers for teacher reference) (see Homework Resources)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lessons 5–6 (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” (one per student) (see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Print or online dictionaries (optional) (including ELL and home language dictionaries)
  • Track Progress: Read, Understand, and Explain New Text (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (several per student)
  • Language Dive: “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” Lines 20–22 sentence chunk strips (one per pair of students)
  • Language Dive: “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” Lines 20–22 note-catcher (one per student)
  • Homework: Read and Analyze Savage Biography (one per student; see Homework Resources)
  • Homework: Read and Analyze Savage Biography ▲

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner (5 minutes)

  • Return students' Module 2 End of Unit 3 Assessments with feedback, and allow students time to review feedback and write their name on the board if they require support.
  • Repeated routine: Students respond to questions on Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lessons 5-6. Students may choose to share their goals for this assessment with a partner or the class.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (30 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning targets relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can determine the meaning of figurative language in 'Lift Every Voice and Sing.'" 

"I can compare and contrast the written version of 'Lift Every Voice and Sing' to its audio version, analyzing the effects of techniques in each medium."

"I can identify themes in "'Lift Every Voice and Sing.'"

  • Distribute Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Compare and Contrast Versions of "Lift Every Voice and Sing." Tell students that for this assessment, they will read the poem "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and analyze its figurative language by answering selected response questions. Next, they will listen to an audio recording of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and compare and contrast the effects of the singing techniques and the written poem. 
  • Read the directions for each part of the assessment aloud as students to follow along. Answer clarifying questions.
  • Before students begin the assessment, ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

"What value does the task of a reading assessment have for you beyond this class? Why?" (Responses will vary. Possible response: This task has a lot of value for me because I will have to take reading assessments and analyze poetry in most of my high school and college classes.) 

"What will help you succeed on this assessment?" (Responses will vary. Possible response: Using my strategies to answer selected response questions and writing a paragraph with a topic sentence, at least two pieces of evidence, and a concluding statement will help me succeed with this task.)

  • Direct students' attention to the following materials:
    • Academic and domain-specific word walls 
    • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart 
    • Strategies to Answer Selected Response Questions anchor chart 
    • Vocabulary log
    • Print or online dictionaries
  • Remind students to refer to these materials as they read the assessment text and answer the assessment questions.
  • Remind students that because this is an assessment, they should complete it independently in silence. Focus students on the Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and review perseverance, taking initiative, and taking responsibility. Remind students that because they will be reading and answering questions independently for the assessment, they will need to practice these habits.
  • Invite students to begin the assessment.
  • While they are taking the assessment, circulate to monitor and document their test-taking skills.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning target.

For Lighter Support

  • Before the mid-unit assessment in Work Time A, challenge students to underline key vocabulary in the assessment directions and writing prompt as the class reads them aloud. Also, invite students who need lighter support to restate or clarify information for students who need heavier support. These supports ensure that students understand each task included in the assessment.

For Heavier Support

  • In Work Time A, read the directions for the assessment slowly, twice, and also post them. This ensures that ELLs who may not be able to easily follow the language of the directions have multiple opportunities to access them.
  • Display a "map" of the assessment to reference while explaining directions to the mid-unit assessment. This will reduce ambiguity and give students a clearer picture of what they can expect so that they can better allocate their time and attentional resources. Provide students with colored pencils or highlighters so that they can mark up the map as needed. Example:
    • Part I: 

1. Read the poem several times. Whisper read it aloud as well.

2. Read each question and each possible answer.

3. Cross out incorrect answers.

4. Select the best answer to the question. 

5. Repeat steps 2-4 for each question in Part I.

    • Part II:

6. Listen to the song once. Then read the questions so you know what to listen for the next time.

7. Listen to the song again and answer the questions as you did above: read each answer, cross out incorrect answers, select the best answer.

8. Make notes or highlight questions you want to check as you listen to the song again.

9. Read the prompt for question 3.

10. Write a paragraph with

a. a topic sentence that restates and answers the prompt.

b. two pieces of evidence (quotes or examples) from the text.

c. sentences that explain how the evidence supports your answer.

d. a concluding sentence that restates and answers the prompt.

  • To help students manage their time during the mid-unit assessment, display on the board or on a poster suggested times at which students move on to the next question. Allocate the most time to Part II item 3, the constructed response.

B. Track Progress (10 minutes)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their completion of the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment.
  • Distribute the Track Progress folders, Track Progress: Read, Understand, and Explain New Text, and several blank sticky notes to each student.
  • Focus students on the Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart. Remind students that they will take responsibility for their own learning as they track their progress.
  • Tell students the sticky notes are for them to find evidence in assessing the following criteria:
    • RL.7.1
    • RL.7.4, L.7.4
  • Guide students through completing the recording form.
  • Incorporate reflection on and awareness of the following academic mindsets: "I can succeed at this" and "My ability and competence grow with my effort."
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: 

"What helped you to be successful at that task? How much effort did you put in on this task? How did your effort affect your learning?" (Possible responses: I was successful at that task because I focused and worked hard. I also understood what I was doing and what was being asked of me, which helped me succeed as well.)

  • N/A

C. Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 - RL.7.4 (10 minutes) 

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to facilitate a Language Dive with the following lines from the poem:

"Out from the gloomy past,
Till now we stand at last,
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast."

  • Use the accompanying materials to facilitate the Language Dive:
    • Language Dive Guide: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 (for teacher reference)
    • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 Sentence Chunk Chart (for teacher reference)
    • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 sentence chunk strips
    • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
    • Language Dive: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," Lines 20-22 note-catcher

For Lighter Support

  • During the Language Dive of Work Time C, students analyze the use of figurative language. Invite ELLs to remind their classmates who need heavier support what figurative language is and how to interpret it. (Figurative language has another meaning besides what the words mean literally or in the dictionary. To interpret it, describe the concrete or familiar object to better understand what the writer is saying about the abstract or unfamiliar object.) Encourage students to identify other examples of figurative language in "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and work in pairs to interpret these examples. They can share their ideas with classmates who need heavier support. Additional practice in identifying, interpreting, and explaining figurative language will improve students' analysis, speaking, and listening skills.

For Heavier Support

  • During the Language Dive of Work Time C, some students may need additional support as they complete the sentence frame in the Practice section (I stand where _____). Ask students to work together to generate a list of common objects that are happy or hopeful (sun, laughter, smiles, blue sky, warm rain, growing trees, etc.). As necessary, model using a student-generated idea to complete the sentence frame: "I stand where trees grow tall and strong."

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Compare Lift Every Voice and Sing Statue to Poem – RL.7.2 (20 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can identify themes in ‘Lift Every Voice and Sing.’”

  • Display the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. Inform students that they will look at a piece of art and analyze it for technique and theme. 
  • Display the image of The Harp sculpture, otherwise known as Lift Every Voice and Sing. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

“Describe the sculpture. What do you see? What is happening? How is each piece related to the other piece?” (People are standing close together, singing. A large hand is supporting all the people. A man is crouching in the front, holding something. It looks like he is offering it to someone.) Note that the crouching man is holding a sheet with musical notes on it.

“What do you wonder about this artwork?” (I wonder why the man is crouching. I wonder what he is holding and why he is holding it out.) If students need more support in describing the sculpture, ask:

“How are the people arranged?” (All of the people are standing and singing, except for one.)

“What do you notice that is different about one of the people from the others?” (One of the people is kneeling.)

“What is holding up the base of the harp?” (A hand.)

  • Record student responses in the first column of the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. Explain that the sculpture is called The Harp or Lift Every Voice and Sing. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

“How does the name of the sculpture help you figure out what it is about?” (The people look like a harp, singing together. Perhaps the crouching man is offering the music to the audience, like the singers are.) If necessary, sketch or display an image of a harp to support students who don’t have this background knowledge.

“What theme does the sculpture convey?” (The sculpture shows that people work together to make something beautiful, just like the strings on the harp work together to create beautiful music.)

  • If students need support identifying a theme, ask:

“What is the sculpture saying about collaboration and art (music)?” (When people collaborate, they can make beautiful art.)

  • Record student responses in the second and third columns of the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: 

“How does the crouching man add to or change the theme?” (The crouching man seems to show that the people are offering the music to someone. So the theme might be that people work together to create something beautiful for others.)

  • If necessary, remind or explain to students that the crouching man is holding a sheet with musical notes on it.
  • Record student responses in the fourth column of the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share: 

“How does the large hand add to or change the theme?” (The large hand might represent a deity or a powerful helper. So the theme might change to people are supported by a powerful helper and work together to make art for others.)

  • Record student responses in the fourth column of the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. 
  • Display the Techniques anchor chart and ask students to Turn and Talk to grapple with techniques of art they saw in The Harp statue. Explain the following terms and record them on the anchor chart: position of figures (where the figures are in relation to each other), movement of figures (how the figures seem to be moving), use of light (the light and dark parts of the work), or symbolism (the use of an object to represent an idea). Refer to Techniques anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Ask students to work in pairs or small groups to complete rows of the Harlem Renaissance Themes note-catcher for the poem and song versions of “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” Display the poem, and play the song several times.
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning target.

B. Launch Independent Research Reading - RI.7.10 (15 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can select a research reading text that I want to read."

  • Launch independent reading for this module. There is a suggested independent reading launch in Independent Reading Sample Plans. Remind students that they were introduced to Independent Research Reading in Module 1.
  • At the end of 5 minutes, distribute students' independent reading journals.
  • Remind students they will use this journal to log their independent reading, both choice and research reading, and to answer reading prompts.
  • Display the independent reading pages of the Unit 1 Homework Resources (for families) and focus students on the information they need to record using the example on the same page.
  • As necessary, model how to log independent reading without the prompt. Remind students that they will log their research reading in the front of the book and choice reading in the back. Ensure that students understand the difference between independent research reading (topical texts) and choice reading (any texts they want to read).
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning target.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

Homework

HomeworkLevels of Support

A. Build Background Knowledge Read and Analyze Savage Biography

  • Students read Augusta Savage's biography and answer questions to build their background knowledge of the artist and the context of the Harlem Renaissance.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Next, they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

For Lighter Support

  • Before students leave class, ask them to read the homework assignment and if time allows, the biography of Augusta Savage in the Harlem Renaissance packet. Then they can work with a partner to highlight the key details and discuss their responses to the homework questions. This oral processing helps confirm comprehension and advances their speaking, listening, and writing skills.

For Heavier Support

  • Before students leave class, review the homework assignment and if time allows, the biography of Augusta Savage in the Harlem Renaissance packet. Then students can work with a partner to highlight the key details and to discuss their responses to the homework questions. Also, encourage students to use the Homework: Read and Analyze Savage Biography . This resource includes sentence frames which support students in comprehension and writing.

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