Create a Podcast: Draft a Narrative Lead | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G7:M2:U3:L7

Create a Podcast: Draft a Narrative Lead

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • W.7.3, SL.7.6

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • W.7.2, W.7.4, W.7.5, L.7.6

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can determine criteria for an effective narrative lead in a podcast. (W.7.3)
  • I can write the narrative lead of a podcast script using effective techniques and relevant descriptive details. (W.7.3)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 (W.7.3)
  • Work Time B: Narrative lead draft (W.7.3)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.7.3 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyze a Model Narrative Lead in a Podcast Script - W.7.3 (15 minutes)

B. Draft a Narrative Lead for a Podcast Script - W.7.3 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Triad Share - SL.7.6 (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish Drafting Narrative Lead: Students finish drafting their narrative lead, making sure to include a hook, characters, and problem, as well as narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description.

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.7.3 – Opening A: On an entrance ticket, students identify narrative techniques in the podcast they listened to in Lesson 1.
  • W.7.3 – Work Time A: Students analyze the techniques and structure of a narrative lead to the Model Podcast Script.
  • W.7.3 – Work Time B: Students draft a narrative lead for their podcast script that engages the reader and uses a variety of narrative techniques to establish the context of the epidemic.
  • SL.7.6 – Closing and Assessment A: Students share their narrative leads with their triads and discuss how the narrative lead may require less formal English than the rest of the podcast script.
  • In this lesson, students focus on working to become effective learners by collaborating with others in analyzing and sharing narrative leads and taking responsibility for their own work as they draft a narrative lead. These activities also involve working to become ethical people as they practice compassion and respect listening to one another’s work.
  • If homework is not an option for students and they don’t finish their narrative lead in this lesson, then in Work Time A of Lesson 8 they can work with their triad to finish a lead from their three partially completed leads.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Release more responsibility more quickly to students as they comprehend the tasks or concepts. For example: 
    • If time allows, encourage students to share elements of their podcast script from the planner with the whole class and explain why they chose a certain narrative technique.
    • Allow those students who are skilled with planning to offer their services as “expert planners” to other groups who may need some support.
  • An optional Mini Language Dive, intended for use after students analyze a model narrative lead in a podcast script in Work Time A, is available in the supporting materials download. ▲

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In previous lessons, students have listened to a podcast to determine criteria for an effective podcast and researched the epidemics over several lessons. In this lesson, students draw on this work as they begin drafting their podcast scripts on the epidemic they researched.

Support All Students

  • For students who may be overwhelmed by too much print on a page, reduce anxiety and support sustained effort by offering a copy of the model podcast script with one paragraph per page. ▲
  • Note there are student and teacher versions of the Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer ▲ in the supporting materials download. ▲

Assessment Guidance

  • Review students’ narrative leads to ensure they are on the right track for writing an effective podcast lead.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will combine the best parts of their narrative leads into one lead for the group’s podcast script and independently draft another section of the podcast script for their triad.

In Advance

  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 at each student's workspace. Also, cue up the podcast students listened to in Lesson 1 of this unit so that it is playing when students enter and as they complete their entrance ticket.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Opening A: Device to play podcast
  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 7.I.A.1, 7.I.B.5, 7.I.B.6, 7.I.C.10, and 7.I.C.12.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson provides a teacher-led exploration of a model narrative lead and a discrete checklist to guide students with their own writing.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to draft a narrative lead, even with the modeling and checklist. In addition to the suggestions below, limit the length of the lead according to students' language abilities. For example, newcomers can create a comic-strip narrative lead that includes dialogue in speech bubbles and labels and plot descriptions. Students who are literate in their home language can write their narrative in their home language.

Vocabulary

  • narrative nonfiction (DS)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Criteria of an Effective Narrative anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 4, Work Time B)
  • Equity sticks (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Model Podcast Script: "Story of the Epidemic of 1994" (for teacher reference) (from Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Domain-specific word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Epidemic Research note-catcher and planner (for teacher reference) (from Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time C)
  • Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, Work Time A)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening B)
  • Model Podcast Script: "Story of the Epidemic of 1994" (one per student; from Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Vocabulary log (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Narrative Writing checklist from Module 1 (optional; from Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 4) 
  • Epidemic Research note-catcher (one per student; from Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time C)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Device to play podcast
  • Narrative Writing checklist (for teacher reference) 
  • Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer ▲ (for teacher reference)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7 (one per student)
  • Narrative Writing checklist (one per student)
  • Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer ▲

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.7.3 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Students respond to questions on Entrance Ticket: Unit 3, Lesson 7. Play the podcast students listened to in Lesson 1 of this unit as students enter and as they complete their entrance ticket.
  • Once students have completed their entrance tickets, use a total participation technique to review their responses.
  • Repeated routine: follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Analyze a Model Narrative Lead in a Podcast Script – W.7.3 (15 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can determine criteria for an effective narrative lead in a podcast.”

  • Display the Criteria of an Effective Narrative anchor chart, and distribute blank copies of the Narrative Writing checklist. Ask students to retrieve their copies of the Model Podcast Script, and reread aloud the narrative lead section, titled “Story of the Epidemic of 1994,” as students follow along. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

“What is the purpose of this section of the podcast?” (to engage the reader and provide context) 

“What type of writing is used in this section?” (narrative) 

“Why it is effective to begin the script in this way?” (engages the reader and provides context)

  • Direct students to use the anchor chart and checklist to identify some of the characteristics of an effective narrative used in this section of the script. As necessary, model identifying characteristics from the checklist in the first paragraph of the script and annotating the displayed script. For example, note how context is established and the description of the setting.
  • Ask students to form their podcast triads and take about 5 minutes to annotate the narrative lead section, “Story of the Epidemic of 1994,” of the Model Podcast Script. Then use equity sticks to have volunteers share some of the characteristics they identified. Consult the Model Podcast Script (for teacher reference) for sample annotations.
  • Explain that the criteria for an effective narrative lead to their podcast script and the criteria for an effective narrative are the same because in the beginning of their podcast, they will tell a story using real information. This is called narrative nonfiction, when a writer or speaker uses tools from narrative to make their stories about real events interesting and engaging. Record this term on the domain-specific word wall, and ask students to record it in their vocabulary logs.
  • Allow several minutes for students to work in their podcast triads to complete the third column of the Narrative Writing checklist, drawing on their learning from the model and their experience listening to the podcast in the opening activity. Note that there are several criteria that they will not consider for their narrative leads, which have been indicated on their copies of the Narrative Writing checklist. If students need more support, they may use their copies of the Narrative Writing checklist from Module 1, noting differences between their narratives about Lost Children and these about epidemics. ▲ Circulate to identify any criteria to review as a class, using the Narrative Writing checklist (for teacher reference) for sample criteria as necessary.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time A, if time allows, encourage students to act out the model narrative lead by assigning students the roles of megaphone speaker, people, pharmacists, sick people, business executive, doctor, police, child, and narrator. (Partner students at varied levels for roles, so students who need lighter support can model actions for their classmates who need heavier support.) The narrator reads from the script while the other students act out the events and read the dialogue. For example, the narrator might read, "people reacted in fear and panic." The students playing the role of "the people" would pantomime being panicked. Enacting the narrative lead helps students and their classmates who need heavier support visualize the story and highlights the narrative techniques like dialogue and description.
  • After Work Time A, invite students to participate in a Mini Language Dive in small groups to explore descriptive detail within the narrative lead of a podcast script. The sentence also helps students to address L.7.1a by providing an opportunity to explain the function of phrases and L.7.5c by providing an opportunity to distinguish among the connotations of a words with similar definitions (probed vs. asked).

For Heavier Support

  • In Work Time A, if time allows, encourage students to act out the model narrative lead by assigning students the roles of megaphone speaker, people, pharmacists, sick people, business executive, doctor, police, child, and narrator. (Partner students at varied levels for roles, so students who need heavier support are supported by the modeling of their classmates who need lighter support.) The narrator reads from the script while the other students act out the events and read the dialogue. For example, the narrator might read, "people reacted in fear and panic." The students playing the role of "the people" would pantomime being panicked. Enacting the narrative lead helps students visualize the story and highlights the narrative techniques like dialogue and description.

B. Draft a Narrative Lead in a Podcast Script – W.7.3 (15 minutes)

  • Review the appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can write the narrative lead of a podcast script using effective techniques and relevant descriptive details.”

  • Tell students that they will now begin to draft a narrative lead for their podcast scripts individually before sharing with their triads. Explain that even though students will plan and eventually make their podcasts in triads, they will first write the narrative lead individually. Then the best parts of their individual narratives will be combined to create the narrative lead for their podcast presentation. Invite students to retrieve their Epidemic Research note-catcher and Narrative Writing checklist to help guide their writing. As necessary, remind students that their narrative leads should provide context about the epidemic and include a hook, some dialogue, and descriptive details. If students need additional support in developing their narrative lead, provide them with a copy of the Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer ▲. Consult the Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer (for teacher reference) for possible responses to guide students in completing the graphic organizer.
  • Remind students that as they draft, they should be thinking about how they will eventually present their scripts as a podcast and should write accordingly. Tell students that it is okay to adopt both a conversational tone and a formal tone at the appropriate times in their scripts.
  • Focus students on the Work to Become Effective Learners anchor chart, specifically: “I persevere.” Remind students that since they will be working independently, they will need to persist through challenges as they draft.
  • Invite students to begin drafting. Circulate to support students as they work.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time B, encourage students to orally rehearse their ideas for the narrative lead with their triad to allow students to generate ideas and solidify language use.
  • Also in Work Time B, challenge students to include one example of an adverbial phrase with the word like to make a comparison as they learned in the Language Dive from Lessons 5–6.

For Heavier Support

  • In Work Time B, encourage students to use the Narrative Writing Plan graphic organizer . This resource guides students in planning their narrative lead before writing. In addition to using the graphic organizer, some students may find it helpful to sketch their ideas in scenes to ensure they know the order of events, the key individuals, and their actions and ideas.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingLevels of Support

A. Triad Share - SL.7.6 (10 minutes)

  • Instruct students to reread the narrative lead they have written and star a best part, considering what makes it best. Students can use their Narrative Writing checklist to identify a section that aligns closely to one of the criteria on the checklist.
  • Return students to their podcast triads, taking turns sharing out the best parts of their podcast scripts. Students who are listening should note where they hear strong narrative techniques in their classmates' scripts. As necessary, display the Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart, and remind students to practice compassion and respect as they listen to one another's scripts.
  • Ask volunteers to define formal English and informal English. Formal English is used in most school papers;  textbooks; newspaper and magazine articles; and school, business, and political presentations. It includes complete sentences and standard grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Informal English is used in most personal conversations and some fiction and personal writing. It may include slang, incomplete sentences, and nonstandard grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Ask students to reread their narrative leads and Think-Triad-Share:

"Where did you use formal English in your narrative lead? Where did you use more informal English? What was the effect of the formal or informal English?" (Responses will vary, but may include: I used formal English in most of my narrative lead, but in the hook, I used informal English to show emotion in the dialogue and how people speak naturally.)

  • Note that in the narrative lead of a podcast script, students will likely use both informal and formal English. In the rest of their podcast script, they are likely to use more formal English.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

For Lighter Support

  • As necessary, spend a few more minutes explaining formal versus informal English by challenging students to brainstorm situations in which they would use each and why. Also, encourage them to share examples from their narrative leads of formal and informal English. This extended instruction will support students by ensuring they understand when and how to use formal and informal English.

For Heavier Support

  • As necessary, spend a few more minutes explaining formal versus informal English by working with students to brainstorm situations in which they would use each and why. Also, with permission, share examples from other students' narrative leads of formal and informal English. This extended instruction will support students by ensuring they understand when and how to use formal and informal English.

Homework

Homework

A. Finish Drafting Narrative Lead

  • Students finish drafting their narrative lead, making sure to include a hook, characters, and problem, as well as narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description.

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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