Plan Independent Argument Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U3:L7

Plan Independent Argument Essay

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, RI.6.3, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9b

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.10, W.6.7, W.6.8, W.6.10

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can write a claim based on reasons and relevant evidence from my research. (W.6.1a)
  • I can plan an argument essay about why my focus figure's accomplishments are remarkable. (W.6.1, W.6.5)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Claim statement for independent essay (W.6.1a)
  • Work Time A: Optional Independent Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.7, W.6.8, W.6.9b, W.6.10)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1a (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Plan Argument Essay - W.6.1, W.6.5 (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief: Argument Writing Checklist - W.6.1c, W.6.8 (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Plan Independent Argument Essay: Students work to complete their planning for their Independent Argument Essay.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.6.1 - Opening A: Students review their Independent Argument Evidence note-catchers and locate the two strongest reasons to support the claim that their focus figure's accomplishments are remarkable.
  • RI.6.1 - Work Time A: Students plan their independent argument essays. They identify the textual evidence they will use to support their claims.
  • RI.6.3 - Work Time A: Students refer to key events presented in their sources, and how they have been elaborated upon by the authors of those sources, as they collect evidence to support their claims.
  • W.6.1 - Work Time A: Students plan independent argument essays in which they support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  • W.6.4 - Work Time A: Students plan their independent argument essays to ensure that they produce clear and coherent essays whose development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • W.6.5 - Work Time A: Students develop and strengthen their writing through careful planning of their independent essays.
  • W.6.9b - Work Time A: Students use textual evidence to support the claims and reasons of their independent argument essays.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Identify students in class who are particularly good at different aspects of the writing process; allow them to conference with their classmates to give advice on their area of expertise.
  • Depending on students' previous experience, consider extending their knowledge of documentation of sources with a more formal bibliography with in-text citations rather than a simple list of titles and authors.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • Students have been analyzing a model and using their analysis to draft a collaborative argument essay. In this lesson, students use what they learned during the collaborative writing process to independently complete their evidence gathering and then plan their argument essay based on their research about their focus figure.

Support All Students

  • Some students may feel nervous by the idea of writing an argument essay on their own. Remind them they have already written an argument essay in Module 3 (literary argument). Point out the similarities between the content of this essay and that of the Mary or Katherine collaborative essays. Help students recognize that much of their thinking about the essay topic has already taken place as they gathered their evidence while researching. Encourage them to shift their mental energy to differences in structure, purpose, and audience between the two types of writing tasks. The writing planner is optional for the independent essay in this module, but consider which students might benefit from its continued use for this assessment task.
  • Remind students that the more they plan their essays now, the easier the Argument Essay task will be. It may be helpful for some students to have an opportunity to interact and discuss their ideas aloud before beginning to plan independently.

Assessment Guidance

  • Use the Grade 6 Writing Process checklist to assess students' writing abilities in Work Time A (see the Tools Page ).
  • Meet with each student during the planning time for a 1-minute conference to check for understanding.

Down the Road

  • In the next two lessons, students will complete the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, for which they independently draft their argument essays based on their research, evidence gathering, and planning.

In Advance

  • Gather devices for students who prefer to plan their essays using a computer or tablet. Ensure devices are logged in and in good working order.
  • Review the student tasks and example answers to get familiar with what students will be required to do in the lesson (see Materials list).
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students, including entrance ticket (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students who struggle to remain focused may benefit from breaking up the planning time into smaller chunks. Use an online timer set to smaller increments, perhaps 5 minutes, and give students one discrete task to focus on during each 5-minute interval (e.g., coming up with a hook for their introduction).
  • Work Time A: Students may prefer to type their responses for the optional Argument Writing Planner. Provide devices with word-processing software, if available.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.C.10, 6.I.C.11, 6.I.C.12, 6.II.A.1, 6.II.A.2, 6.II.B.3, 6.II.B.4, 6.II.B.5, 6.II.B.6, and 6.II.B.7.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson gives students time and guidance to plan the argument essays that they will write during the mid-unit assessment of the following lesson. They review their Independent Argument Evidence note-catchers and choose the two strongest reasons to support the claim that their focus figure's accomplishments are remarkable.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to independently plan their essays, especially if they relied heavily on the support of their partners during the collaborative essays. Work with students to develop a timeline that can keep them moving through their planning at an appropriate pace. Encourage students to think about which sections of the collaborative essay were the most challenging or time-consuming for them, and encourage them to allocate the most time to these sections.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 14 Work Time A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, Work Time B)
  • Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Characteristics of Effective Argument Writing anchor chart (example for teacher reference) (from Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Characteristics of Effective Argument Writing anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 14 Work Time A)
  • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Collaborative Argument Essay (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Argument Writing checklist (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • N/A
  • Argument Writing Planner: Independent (optional; one per student)
  • Lined paper or devices with word-processing software (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1a (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can write a claim based on reasons and relevant evidence from my research."

  • Direct students to retrieve their Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher that was started in Unit 2, Lesson 14.
  • Display the instructions, and read them aloud:

"Review your note-catchers. Choose your two strongest reasons for why your focus figure's accomplishments are remarkable. Use these points to draft the claim statement for your essay on the bottom of your note-catcher." (Responses will vary.)

  • Refer to Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as needed. Invite students to turn to an elbow partner to share their claim statement.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons. Invite students to choose a habit of character focus for themselves for this lesson.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Plan an Argument Essay - W.6.1, W.6.5 (30 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can plan an argument essay about why my focus figure's accomplishments are remarkable."

  • Explain that students will now use their completed evidence note-catcher to plan an argument essay that supports their claim.
  • Remind students of the prompt for their independent essay: why are my focus figure's accomplishments remarkable?
  • An optional Argument Writing Planner: Independent is available for those who need it. Explain to students that they are free to create their own planner if they wish. Provide lined paper or devices, depending on students' preferences.
  • Remind students of the feedback they received on their collaborative essay during Lesson 5. Push them to incorporate those stars and steps into their planning today.
  • Refer to the following materials as necessary:
    • Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher
    • Independent Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
    • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer
    • Collaborative Argument Writing Plan graphic organizer (example for teacher reference)
    • Collaborative Argument Essay
    • Annotated Collaborative Argument Essays (example for teacher reference)
    • Argument Writing checklist
    • Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference)
    • Characteristics of Effective Argument Writing anchor chart
  • Circulate to support students as they plan. If necessary, prompt by asking questions such as the following:

"What evidence do you have for this point?"

"How does that evidence support your point?"

"How does that point support your claim?"

  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • During Work Time A, encourage students who need lighter support to revisit and polish the sentences they produced during the Practice sections of the Language Dives and Mini Language Dives of Lessons 1, 3, and 4. Encourage students to incorporate these sentences into their planners for use in the independent argument essays that they write during the mid-unit assessment of the following lessons.

For Heavier Support

  • During Work Time A, work with students who need heavier support to help them revise the sentences they produced during the Practice sections of the Language Dives and Mini Language Dives of Lessons 1, 3, and 4. Encourage students to use these sentences as "checkpoints" around which the remainder of their essay can be built.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief: Argument Writing Checklist - W.6.1c, W.6.8 (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to retrieve their copy of the Argument Writing checklist. Point out the following characteristics on the checklist:
    • "W.6.1c: I use words and phrases to show that my reasons are connected to my claim."
    • "W.6.8: I provide a bibliography of sources."
  • Turn and Talk:

"Look at the second column. Are there any specific criteria you should be aware of specifically for this collaborative essay?" (I use transitions from one idea to the next and in between evidence about the figure's accomplishments and reasoning for why they're remarkable. I cite the anchor text Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly and/or my research sources.)

  • As students share, capture their responses in the Characteristics of This Argument Writing column, and direct them to do the same on their own copy. Refer to the Argument Writing checklist (example for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Clarify for students how they are expected to document their sources.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

Homework

Homework

A. Plan Independent Argument Essay

  • Students work to complete their planning for their independent argument essay.

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