Launch Focus Figure Research | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U2:L13

Launch Focus Figure Research

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, W.6.1, W.6.9b

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.3, RI.6.10, W.6.10, SL.6.1c

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can gather evidence and develop reasoning for an argument essay about Katherine Johnson's remarkable accomplishments. (W.6.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, W.6.1, W.6.9b, W.6.10)
  • Work Time A: Gist on sticky notes

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read Hidden Figures, Chapters 17 and 18 (25 minutes)

B. Introduce Focus Figure Research - SL.6.1c (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Remarkable Accomplishments: Katherine Johnson (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text: Students preread chapters 20 and 21 in Hidden Figures in preparation for studying these chapters in the next lesson.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • RI.6.1 – Opening A: Students use evidence from the text to support their analysis of the text on their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catchers.
  • W.6.1 – Opening A: Students add to their note-catchers with relevant evidence and clear reasons that support claims that they will elaborate on in a later argument essay.
  • W.6.9b – Opening A: Students gather relevant evidence from the anchor text and add it to their note-catchers to support their claims.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Focus students on a particularly powerful sentence in chapter 17 of Hidden Figures: “The problem was that women had to get over the high hurdle of low expectations—they needed to prove that they were just as good as men and should be held to the same standards and given the same opportunities” (143). Point out that this sentence mirrors a similar claim made by the author in chapter 6: “Because of the discrimination, they believed that African Americans needed to be twice as good to get half as far as their white counterparts” (46). The chapter 6 sentence was the focus of a Language Dive in Unit 2 Lesson 4. Challenge students to design their own Language Dive around this sentence from chapter 17.
  • Chapter 17 of Hidden Figures discusses some of the ways in which Katherine Goble faced gender discrimination at work. Use a news source, such as Newsela, to find age-appropriate, contemporary articles about the ways in which gender discrimination and bias are still present in modern workplaces and how individuals and organizations are working against those discriminatory practices.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the previous lesson, students read two more chapters about Katherine Johnson, updating their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher with text details to support the claim that her accomplishments were remarkable. Having completed this work in jigsaw groups, students meet back with their home groups during Opening A of this lesson to share what they learned previously.
  • In this lesson, students read chapters 17 and 18 in the anchor text to complete their analysis of Katherine Johnson. They update the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart once more in preparation for the writing task in Unit 3. Students also review the requirements for the performance task to connect how their work with the anchor text acts as a foundation for the independent research they will conduct on an underrecognized focus figure.

Support All Students

  • The list of focus figure options for the independent argument essay and the performance task is not exhaustive. Students may feel particularly strongly about conducting their research on another individual. Determine whether options beyond the list will be allowed. If so, ensure that the individual chosen meets the criteria of the task and that there are at least two other students who want to work together to research this alternative focus figure.
  • Consider providing the “NASA Former Astronauts” page of the NASA website as a starting point for all student research (http://eled.org/0253).
  • Some individuals on the Focus Figure Options list will require more extensive research to unearth all of the necessary biographical details. For students with less advanced research or computing skills, consider encouraging them toward research subjects whose information is more readily available online (e.g., Sally Ride).
  • Students may not understand the “Houston, we have a problem” reference on the Performance Task: Picture Book Directions. A version of this statement was first uttered by astronaut Jim Lovell during the Apollo 13 mission and made famous when spoken by actor Tom Hanks playing the role of Jim Lovell in the 1995 film Apollo 13. Consider playing this film clip to provide context for this cultural reference.

Assessment Guidance

  • Review students’ entries on their Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher to ensure that recorded textual evidence is appropriate, relevant, and comprehensive. Remind students that this note-catcher serves as preparation for the collaborative essays they will write in Unit 3; the more effort they put into the note-catcher now, the easier the writing task will be later.
  • Circulate and monitor during the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol in Work Time B, taking note of the questions, misconceptions, or concerns students have around the independent argument essay and the related performance task. Address any major areas of confusion right away; consider placing more nuanced questions on a Parking Lot chart to be revisited as students become more familiar with the task and requirements.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students read two more chapters in Hidden Figures, and, as the text is coming to a close, begin to synthesize their learning by revisiting the module guiding questions. The rest of the lesson allows time for students to begin their initial research on their focus figure in preparation for the independent argument essay and performance task in Unit 3. Consider the logistics and materials preparation necessary to facilitate the research work in the next lesson.

In Advance

  • Read chapters 17 and 18 of Hidden Figures in advance to identify plot points and vocabulary that may require clarification or sensitivity.
  • Determine how the crews will be formed for the focus of the independent argument essay and the collaborative performance task. The lesson is designed to have students pick their top three choices for the focus figure they would like to research. Then review the sticky notes, and form groups based on student preference. If random groups or strategically selected groups are preferred, skip this step in the lesson.
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time B: Display the sentence frames used during the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol on an external monitor for easy reference.
  • Work Time B: Prepare a slideshow of the focus figures included in the list of options to provide visual support and increase excitement for the task.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.A.1, 6.I.B.6, and 6.II.A.1.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson offers opportunities for reflection and questioning as students begin their focus figure research. This research project will extend into Unit 3, and the students' findings will inform both students' independent argument essays and their performance tasks. After reading the Performance Task: Children's Picture Book handout, students have a chance to ask questions and voice concerns through a Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol with Because-But-So sentence frames.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to select their top choices from the Performance Task: Focus Figures Options handout in a limited amount of time. Highlight four to six figures for ELLs to focus their attention on first, rather than asking ELLs to skim and scan the entire list for their choices.

Vocabulary

  • N/A

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (one for display; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Text Guide: Hidden Figures (Young Readers' Edition) (for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Performance Task anchor chart (one for display; from Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time B)
  • Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (example for teacher reference) (from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (one for display; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (one per student; from Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, Opening A)
  • Hidden Figures (Young Readers' Edition) (text; one per student; from Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Opening A)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • N/A
  • Sticky notes (two per student)
  • Synopsis: Hidden Figures, Chapters 17 and 18 (one per student)
  • Performance Task: Picture Book Directions (one per student; see Performance Task Overview and Supporting Materials)
  • Performance Task: Focus Figure Options (one per student; see Performance Task Overview and Supporting Material)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.1 (5 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

"I can gather evidence and develop reasoning for an argument essay about Katherine Johnson's remarkable accomplishments."

  • Remind students that, in the previous lesson, they worked in their jigsaw expert groups (AAAA or BBBB) to read chapters about Katherine Johnson from their anchor texts.
  • Direct students to move to their home-group pairs (AB) to share the information they gathered during the jigsaw and add at least one more example to the Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher. Refer to the Collaborative Argument Evidence note-catcher (example for teacher reference) for guidance.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Read Hidden Figures, Chapters 17 and 18 (25 minutes)

  • Direct students to retrieve their anchor text, Hidden Figures, and open to chapter 17.
  • Repeated routine: Read chapter 17 (pages 140-144) and chapter 18 (pages 145-152). Students continue to record the gist on sticky notes, unpack and record unfamiliar vocabulary, update the Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart, and reflect on their reading as they choose. Students continue to identify how key individuals in the text demonstrate habits of character. Refer to the Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (example for teacher reference), Text Guide: Hidden Figures, and chapter synopsis as needed, as well as any other appropriate resources.
  • Gist of chapter 17:
    • Katherine Goble learned all she could about space travel.
    • Goble advocated for her attendance at and participation in the research discussion meetings.
  • Gist of chapter 18:
    • Katherine Goble began to specialize in trajectory analysis.
    • Goble worked on a report with an engineer, and the engineer stated that Johnson should finish the report.
    • Katherine Goble married Jim Johnson.
    • Katherine Johnson submitted her first research report.
  • N/A

B. Introduce Focus Figure Research - SL.6.1c (10 minutes)

  • Direct students to the Performance Task anchor chart, and invite them to reread the details of the task. Remind them they were first introduced to the performance task in Unit 1, Lesson 1.
  • Distribute Performance Task: Picture Book Directions. Call on a student to read the directions for the performance task aloud.
  • Display on a board or chart paper the following three sentence frames:
    • I am feeling ___ about the performance task because . . .
    • I am feeling ___ about the performance task, but . . .
    • I am feeling ___ about the performance task, so . . .
  • Remind students of Because-But-So sentence frames they have previously used to reflect on their thinking. Explain that students will choose one word to describe how they are feeling about creating and completing the performance task. Using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, students will have time to think of their response, then share it aloud with a partner.
  • Move students into pairs for the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Read aloud each sentence frame one at a time. After each sentence frame, allow think time before prompting students to turn face-to-face and share their responses with their partner.
  • Circulate and monitor, taking note of the questions, misconceptions, or concerns students have around the task. Point out the different conjunction in each sentence frame to ensure student responses match the intention of the frame.
  • Refocus whole group, and summarize what was heard, clarifying any immediate questions or concerns.
  • Remind students that they will be working in triads to produce their performance task. Point out that, like the crews of the Apollo missions, students will be working with teams of three! Those crews will be formed based on common interests.
  • Explain to students that before working with their crew to create their children's book pages, they will research a focus figure and then in Unit 3 write an independent argument essay about that focus figure. The prompt of this independent essay (Why are my focus figure's accomplishments remarkable?) will be the same as for the collaborative argument essay about either Katherine or Mary for which they have been gathering evidence during Unit 2.
  • Inform students that they will begin the focus figure research in the next lesson, so today they are going to have a chance to browse the possible focus figures and select their top three choices.
  • Distribute Performance Task: Focus Figures Options. Explain that this list represents just some of the many other women who contributed to advancements in space science and who are deserving of special recognition.
  • Invite students to scan the list and read the short bios of each focus figure. Direct them to star the three figures they are most interested in researching.
  • Distribute sticky notes. Ask students to write their name and their top three choices for a focus figure to research on their sticky note. Collect the notes, and plan to arrange crews of three before the next lesson.

For Lighter Support

  • At the beginning of Work Time B, as students use the Because-But-So frames to reflect on their thinking about the performance task, use a Conversation Cue to prompt students to paraphrase how their partner completed the frames (e.g., "Who can repeat what your classmate said?"; "Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?"). This will help students to practice restating ideas in their own words.
  • Consider developing an extension to Work Time B that involves an action step. Students who need lighter support can pair up and offer strategies for one another to address any concerns and improve their attitudes toward the performance task.

For Heavier Support

  • Later in Work Time B, help orient ELLs who need heavier support to the features of the Performance Task: Focus Figures Options handout. Ask simple questions that invite students to notice the way the handout is organized. Some examples of these questions are listed below:
    • Are the names listed in alphabetical order by first name or last name? How do you know? Where would your name go on this list?
    • Look at the parentheses after each name. What do the numbers in the parentheses indicate?

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Remarkable Accomplishments: Katherine Johnson (5 minutes)

  • Direct student attention to the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart. Remind students that the main purpose for studying Hidden Figures is to highlight the outstanding women who are the focus of the text.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

"Based on our learning in this lesson, what additions should we make to the anchor chart? What else did Johnson accomplish that was remarkable? Explain why the accomplishment is remarkable."

  • Choose a total participation technique to gather responses. Document student responses on the anchor chart. Refer to the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (example for teacher reference) for guidance.

Homework

Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text

  • Students preread chapters 20 and 21 in Hidden Figures in preparation for studying these chapters in the next lesson.

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