Introduce Hidden Figures | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2019 G6:M4:U2:L1

Introduce Hidden Figures

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Focus Standards: These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RI.6.1, RI.6.4, RI.6.6, L.6.1d, L.6.2a, L.6.4

Supporting Standards: These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RI.6.10, W.6.10, SL.6.1a

Daily Learning Targets

  • I can determine the author's purpose and point of view and how it is conveyed in the prologue and chapter 1 of Hidden Figures. (RI.6.6)
  • I can analyze the connotative meanings of words as they are used in Hidden Figures. (RI.6.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 (W.6.10)
  • Work Time A: Gist on sticky notes
  • Work Time C: Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2-3 note-catcher (RI.6.1, RI.6.4, RI.6.6, SL.6.1a, L.6.1d, L.6.2a, L.6.4)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.6.10 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 - RI.6.6 (10 minutes)

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face - RI.6.6 (10 minutes)

C. Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2-3 - RI.6.4, RI.6.6 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Introduce Remarkable Accomplishments Anchor Chart - L.6.4d (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Preread Anchor Text: Students preread chapters 2 and 3 in Hidden Figures in preparation for studying these chapters in the next lesson.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • RI.6.1 – Work Time B: Students participate in a Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, working together to answer questions about the prologue and chapter 1 of Hidden Figures. They use textual evidence to answer questions about and support their analysis of the text.
  • RI.6.6 – Work Time B: Students answer questions about the author’s point of view toward the hidden figures and how her point of view is conveyed in the text.
  • RI.6.1 – Work Time C: Students participate in a Language Dive that focuses around a sentence from the prologue of Hidden Figures. They use textual evidence to support their analysis of the sentence and the text.
  • RI.6.4 – Work Time C: During the Language Dive, students determine the meanings of words (e.g., heralded) as they are used in the sentence.
  • RI.6.6 – Work Time C: During the Language Dive, students analyze the author’s point of view toward the hidden figures and their accomplishments. They locate words in the sentence that convey this point of view.
  • L.6.1d – Work Time C: During the Language Dive, students identify a vague pronoun with an unclear antecedent. They rewrite the sentence to improve its clarity.
  • L.6.2a – Work Time C: During the Language Dive, students examine the use of a dash to set off a nonrestrictive element in the sentence.
  • L.6.4 – Work Time C: During the Language Dive, students use vocabulary strategies to make a guess about a word’s meaning.

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Hidden Figures was made into a full-length feature film in 2016. Display the movie trailer to build excitement and provide some context before launching the text in this lesson. Strategically utilize clips from the film throughout this unit to highlight key details and events.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In the previous unit, students read about major events of the Space Race, namely the Apollo 11 moon landing. They learned about many of the famous people who contributed to the Apollo 11 mission, like astronaut Buzz Aldrin and President John F. Kennedy. They also read texts that described the social context surrounding the moon landing and read arguments against it. Throughout Unit 1, students continued to develop their abilities to analyze how word connotations convey an author’s point of view. Unit 2 builds on this work by focusing on the contributions of the hidden figures, whose achievements in space science long went unrecognized. Students will learn more about the social context of the time, primarily the rampant discrimination that plagued the United States and limited opportunities for black women. Students will continue to identify authors’ points of view, as well as compare and contrast multiple authors’ presentations of the same events.

Support All Students

  • Note that there is a differentiated version of the Entrance Ticket used in Opening A in the separate Teacher’s Guide for English Language Learners.
  • Students begin the Module 4 anchor text Hidden Figures (Young Readers’ Edition) in this lesson. In this text, author Margot Lee Shetterly describes the lives of four black women whose mathematical and scientific prowess contributed to some of the most important advances in the history of space science. They began their work at NACA (now NASA) at a time of segregation in the United States, and they faced terrible discrimination. Hidden Figures (and Module 4 in general) aims to uplift and celebrate the talents and achievements of these women and other hidden figures in the field of space science.
  • Note that, in activities and discussions throughout the module, the hidden figures are referred to by their first names: Dorothy, Mary, and Katherine. The choice to call these women by their first names was made for two reasons. First, it is consistent with practices of earlier modules, in which the main characters of texts (Percy, William, and Cal) were called by their first names throughout instruction, due to students’ familiarity with them. Second, it reflects Shetterly’s own decision to refer to the women by their first names throughout the text. Still, with this in mind, it is important to recognize that using first names may have a different impact in the context of this module, which aims to center the work of supremely accomplished and talented women in space science. Because the hidden figures experienced rampant discrimination and felt forced to “prove” their worth, referring to them by their first names could be interpreted as condescending, especially when compared to the naming of other (male) figures in Unit 1, like [Neil] Armstrong. If productive, invite students to further discuss the issue of naming, examining how the way in which we name someone or something can validate, or undermine, the subject’s perceived worth.
  • Reading a complex text is more challenging for lower-level readers, including ELLs. To ease the reading load, the anchor text, Hidden Figures, has, in some lessons, been excerpted, helping students to focus on key sections of the chapter. More proficient readers should be encouraged to read the chapter in its entirety. ▲
  • In contextualizing the experiences of the women in the story, Hidden Figures describes the circumstances and effects of segregation, highlighting some events that students are likely to find upsetting and unfair. Do not try to temper students’ reactions to these events. Instead, encourage them to practice empathy by imagining what the hidden figures must have felt at the time. QuickWrites and discussions throughout Unit 2 provide additional outlets for students to process their feelings.
  • In the prologue, the author writes that “these women should be celebrated not just because they are black or because they are women, but because they are an important part of American history” (3). Keep this in mind throughout Units 2 and 3. It is critical to understand the bravery of these women, whose accomplishments are even more remarkable when considered in the context in which they took place. It is also important to uplift the hidden figures’ major mathematical, scientific, and historical contributions. Look for ways to highlight both the scientific and social elements of the hidden figures’ stories.
  • In chapter 1, the author lists regulations that legalized racial segregation at the time that the book’s events took place. These regulations are presented in the text in a powerful way: in a list, with each regulation on its own line and each beginning with the phrase “They could not . . . .” Even if students are familiar with the history of racial segregation, they may still find it upsetting to process to scope of these racist laws. The entrance ticket of the following lesson creates a space for students to reflect on their feelings about this list of laws.

Assessment Guidance

  • Review students’ Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 note-catcher to ensure they are able to determine the author’s point of view and point to specific words and phrases that convey that point of view.
  • Although an author’s purpose and point of view are often related, be sure to draw a distinction for students between the two. An author’s purpose is generally to inform, to persuade, or to entertain. Once the author of Hidden Figures establishes her main purpose in the prologue, to inform, it remains consistent throughout the text. Her point of view may vary depending on the topic on which she is writing.
  • This lesson introduces the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart. In Unit 3, students will answer a writing prompt in which they argue why the accomplishments of the hidden figures are remarkable. Return to this chart often to thoroughly prepare students for the writing task. Point out how much of the writing process is the preparation and organization that takes place even before beginning to write.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students read chapter 2 and an excerpt of chapter 3 from Hidden Figures, continuing their gist work. Then, they participate in an activity to determine the connotative and figurative meanings of multiple-meaning words as they are used in the text.

In Advance

  • Read the prologue and chapter 1 of Hidden Figures in advance to identify plot points and vocabulary that may require clarification or sensitivity.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol (see the Classroom Protocols document on the Tools Page) and the modification used during Work Time B. Decide if students will be allowed to choose their own partners or if some students will be assigned specific partners.
  • Prepare
    • Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart to be used in Work Time A.
    • all Language Dive materials to be used in Work Time B.
    • the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart to be used in Closing and Assessment A.
  • Prepare copies of handouts for students (see Materials list).
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students may keep their gist notes in a digital format using an online word-processing tool such as http://eled.org/0158.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Create the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart using an online word-processing tool such as http://eled.org/0158 to share with families to reinforce learning at home.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 6.I.A.1, 6.I.A.2, 6.I.B.5, 6.I.B.6, 6.I.B.8, 6.II.A.1, 6.II.A.2, 6.II.B.3, 6.II.B.4, 6.II.B.5, and 6.II.C.6.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson guides students through the first chapters of a new anchor text, Hidden Figures (Young Readers' Edition), in a scaffolded, supportive way. An initial entrance ticket invites students to explore features of the text, including chapter titles, headings, the glossary, and the index. This exercise helps orient ELLs to the text in a low-stakes way. It also helps ELLs recognize these text features as useful sources of information about a text: its content, its organization, and its central ideas. In this lesson, students also read the prologue and short first chapter of Hidden Figures. A collaborative Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol supports ELLs by giving them an opportunity to process their own thoughts before co-constructing ideas about the text with their classmates. Finally, a Language Dive highlights a key sentence in the prologue, which expresses the author's purpose for writing Hidden Figures and establishes her point of view toward the women in the story. Through this Language Dive, students have the opportunity to revisit and build upon vocabulary strategies that they have developed in earlier modules, as well as investigate the role of punctuation in setting off contextual information in a sentence.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to transition from Unit 1 to Unit 2, as these units address the module topic in different ways. In Unit 1, students examined informational texts about the Space Race and the moon landing and analyzed attitudes toward the United States' interest in space exploration. In this unit, students begin an anchor text that centers on the scientific and social accomplishments of the talented mathematicians who helped the United States reach the moon and who, as black women occupying positions that they had previously been excluded from, experienced rampant discrimination and prejudice. As needed, support ELLs' understanding of the relationship between these two units. Invite them to revisit Unit 1 texts and track the ideas presented and/or the people centered in each text. Guide students as they reflect on the title of the anchor text. Help them develop their awareness of the fact that traditional stories of the Space Race may not have described or celebrated the important contributions of some people, like the hidden figures.

Vocabulary

  • remarkable (A)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Academic word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Domain-specific word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Questions We Can Ask during a Language Dive anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 9, Work Time B)
  • Vocabulary logs (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 (example for teacher reference)
  • Text Guide: Hidden Figures (Young Readers' Edition) (for teacher reference)
  • Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (one for display; co-created in Work Time A)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Prompts: Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 (one for display)
  • Language Dive Guide: Hidden Figures, Pages 2-3 (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2-3 Sentence Chunk Chart (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2-3 note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
  • Print or online dictionary (one for reference)
  • Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (one for display)
  • Hidden Figures (Young Readers’ Edition) (text; one per student)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 (one per student)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 ▲
  • Synopsis: Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (one per student)
  • Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 Sentence Chunk Strips (one per pair of students)
  • Homework Resources (for families) (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner – W.6.10 (5 minutes)

  • Distribute Hidden Figures (Young Readers’ Edition). Students will need the text to complete the entrance ticket.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to distribute and review the Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 or the Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 ▲. Refer to the Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1 (example for teacher reference) for possible responses.
  • Ask:

“How might you read an informational text like this one differently than you would a literary text, like Two Roads?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I may skip around more, referencing the glossary or timeline as needed to better understand what I’m reading.)

  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as in previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as previous lessons. Invite students to choose a habit of character focus for themselves for this lesson.

For Lighter Support

  • As an extension to the entrance ticket, generate additional activities for students who need lighter support to engage with the features of the new anchor text. Some examples of these activities are described below:
    • Invite students to read the chapter titles presented in the table of contents. Students can discuss or write down their predictions for the central ideas of the text, based on the information embedded in the chapter titles.
    • Invite students to review the glossary, which begins on page 204. Students can mark unknown words for further study and/or practice restating the words’ definitions in their own words.
    • Invite students to examine the Timeline of Important Historical Events, which begins on page 199. Students can reflect on what they know about familiar events in the timeline, and put stars next to events they would like to learn more about.

For Heavier Support

  • During Opening A, invite students who need heavier support to use the Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 1  ▲. This resource features sample text features and sentence starters that help students answer the question on the ticket.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Read Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 – RI.6.6 (10 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can determine the author’s purpose and point of view and how it is conveyed in the prologue and chapter 1 of Hidden Figures.”

  • Invite students to turn to page 1 in their texts. As students read along silently, read aloud pages 1–9. Note that while students may read in small groups or individually in future lessons, students will benefit from this initial introduction to the text as a whole class.
  • Read aloud the selected excerpt, using the Text Guide: Hidden Figures (Young Readers’ Edition) (for teacher reference) for comprehension and vocabulary questions as needed.
  • Invite a student to paraphrase the key points in more comprehensible language for those who need heavier support. ▲
  • Use the Synopsis: Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 to review and note key details for these sections of the text. This will help to complete students’ understanding of the events, especially if they are not able to finish all of the reading.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

“What is the gist of the prologue?” (The African American women mathematicians working at NASA from the 1940s to the 1970s deserve to be recognized.)

“What is the author’s purpose for writing this book based on what you read in the prologue?” (The author’s purpose is to inform readers about the remarkable accomplishments of these four women and all of the African American women employed at NASA. These hidden figures had not received the recognition they deserved for their talent and contributions to space science.)

“What is the gist of chapter 1?” (Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden were mathematicians at NACA during a time in US history when African American women did not get certain jobs because of racial discrimination.)

  • Record this on the Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart. Distribute sticky notes for students to record the gist and place in their texts. Refer to the Gists: Hidden Figures anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to share any new words, adding any unfamiliar words to their vocabulary logs. Add any new words to the academic word wall and domain-specific word wall, and invite students to add translations in native languages. ▲
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning target.
  • N/A

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face - RI.6.6 (10 minutes)

  • Prepare students to engage in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Remind students that they have completed this protocol before. Cold-call students to review the steps of the protocol (students face away from their partners as they listen to a question; students turn around when the signal is given and take turns sharing their response and actively listening to their partner's response). After each question, students will move back-to-back with a different partner.
  • Move students into partners. Direct students to turn back-to-back with their partner. Let students know that they can refer to their texts to answer questions during the protocol. Display the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Prompts: Hidden Figures, Prologue and Chapter 1 resource one question at a time to provide visual support during the protocol.
  • Face-to-face:

"What are some experiences and/or attributes that Dorothy, Mary, Katherine, and Christine have in common?" (Responses will vary, but may include: they all showed special talent in math as children and studied math in college, they all worked as teachers, they were all pioneers in their field, and they were all black women working in an environment that had historically excluded black women.)

  • Direct students to quickly move to a new partner, and turn back-to-back.
  • Face-to-face:

"Why do you think these women are called hidden figures?" (Responses will vary, but may include: they made very important professional and scientific contributions while at NACA/NASA, but they never received much recognition for it; their names and stories are generally unfamiliar.)

  • Direct students to quickly move to a new partner, and turn back-to-back.
  • Face-to-face:

"What habits of character are evident in the descriptions of Dorothy, Mary, Katherine, and Christine?" (Respponses will vary, but may include: the descriptions of Dorothy, Mary, Katherine, and Christine show perseverance because they bravely faced impossibly challenging situations; they also used their strengths to help others grow, contributing to a better world.)

  • Face-to-face:

"Why were the accomplishments of these women especially remarkable for their time?" (Responses will vary, but may include: they excelled at NASA during a time of rampant discrimination against black people; at that time, women were not generally offered jobs in math and science; they produced groundbreaking work that would lead to major advancements in space science.)

  • Direct students to quickly move to a new partner and turn back-to-back.
  • Face-to-face:

"What is the author's point of view toward these women?" (Responses will vary, but may include: The author is admiring of these women. She thinks they were highly skilled, brave, and strong. She thinks they have not received enough recognition.)

  • Direct students to quickly move to a new partner and turn back-to-back.
  • Face-to-face:

"What words or phrases does the author use to convey her point of view in these sections of the text?" (Responses will vary, but may include: deserve to be remembered (2-3); center of their own story (3); important part of American history (3); showed special skill (5); groundbreaking research (6); even more impressive (7).)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their habit of character focus for this lesson.

For Lighter Support

  • During Work Time B, as students participate in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, use strategic combinations of Conversation Cues to help students think with others to expand the conversation:
    • "Can you repeat what your classmate said in your own words?" (Goal 2)
    • "Can you explain why your classmate came up with that response?" (Goal 4)
    • "Can you add on to what your classmate said?" (Goal 4)

For Heavier Support

  • During Work Time B, as students participate in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, use strategic combinations of Conversation Cues to help students listen carefully to one another and be understood:
    • "Can you say more about that?" (Goal 1)
    • "Can you give an example?" (Goal 1)
    • "Can you repeat what your partner said?"
    • (Goal 2)
    • "Do you agree or disagree with what your partner said? Why?" (Goal 4)

C. Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 – RI.6.4, RI.6.6 (15 minutes)

  • Review the learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can analyze the connotative meanings of words as they are used in Hidden Figures.”

  • Tell students they will now participate in a Language Dive to analyze a sentence from the prologue of Hidden Figures. This sentence helps students to determine the author’s point of view in the prologue and chapter 1 of Hidden Figures.
  • Refer to the Questions We Can Ask during a Language Dive anchor chart, and ensure students understand how to use these questions, pointing out that the questions underlined on the anchor chart are questions that students should always ask when they dive into a sentence.
  • Tell students they will now begin the Language Dive. Reread pages 2–3, starting at “The first five women were hired at Langley as computers in 1935 . . .” on page 2 and ending at “This is their story” on page 3.
  • Focus students on the sentence:
    • “The contributions made by these African-American women have never been heralded, but they deserve to be remembered—and not as a side note in someone else’s account, but as the center of their own story.”
  • Use the Language Dive Guide: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 (for teacher reference) and the Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 Sentence Chunk Chart (for teacher reference) to guide students through a Language Dive conversation about the sentence. Distribute and display the Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 note-catcher and the Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 sentence chunk strips. Refer to the Language Dive: Hidden Figures, Pages 2–3 note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • As an extension to the Language Dive of Work Time C, and to reinforce work with L.6.2a, provide students who need lighter support with sentences from the text that use dashes. From these examples, students can extract more general rules about the use of dashes (e.g., when they’re used, what they signal, where in a sentence they can be found). This work will support students in later lessons in the module, when they begin to more formally study the role of dashes, commas, and parentheses to offset nonrestrictive information. Some sentences that can be used during this activity are listed below:
    • “She helped do the math that was required to send the first men into space—and to bring them home safely” (6).
    • “A few years earlier, an ad like this would have been unthinkable—most employers never would have considered a woman for a job that had always been performed by a man” (10).
    • “The applications were not supposed to consider race—a recent law had done away with the requirement that the application must include a photo—but it wasn’t hard for employers to figure out which job candidates were black” (15).
    • “Bulletins listing civil service jobs—nonmilitary government jobs—plastered the walls at local post offices” (23).

For Heavier Support

  • As an extension to the Language Dive of Work Time C, and to reinforce work with L.6.2a, provide students who need heavier support with sentences from the text that use dashes. Students can practice reading these sentences aloud to one another, pausing appropriately at each dash. Support students during this activity to ensure that they are using appropriate pauses and intonation. Some sentences that can be used during this activity are listed below:
    • “She helped do the math that was required to send the first men into space—and to bring them home safely” (6).
    • “Hiring black mathematicians—that was something new” (15).
    • “They earned forty cents an hour—among the lowest wages of all war workers—but for women with few employment options, even that modest sum felt like a windfall” (19).

Source: Shetterly, Margot Lee. Hidden Figures (Young Readers’ Edition). HarperCollins, 2016.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Introduce Remarkable Accomplishments Anchor Chart - L.6.4d (5 minutes)

  • Display the Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart. Remind students that in chapter 1 of Hidden Figures, the author makes the claim that "The accomplishments of these four women were remarkable."
  • Ask:

"What does remarkable mean?" (Responses will vary, but may include: amazing, extraordinary, and awesome.)

  • Invite one student to verify the preliminary definition of remarkable in a print or online dictionary. Add remarkable to the academic word wall, and invite students to add it to their vocabulary logs.
  • Explain that, as students read the anchor text, they will be collecting examples of the hidden figures' remarkable accomplishments.
  • Guide students to fill in one example in the Dorothy Vaughan section of the anchor chart based on their reading in chapter 1.
  • Say:

"On page 6, the author writes that Vaughan was one of the first African American women to be hired by NACA as a computer. Let's list this in the left-hand column as an example of a remarkable accomplishment."

  • Turn and Talk:

"What makes this accomplishment remarkable?" (This is remarkable because racial discrimination was common, limiting, and oppressive at the time. Dorothy persevered and did so without many other role models because she was one of the first to be hired.)

  • Add this reasoning to the right-hand column of the anchor chart. Explain that students will add to the chart continually throughout the unit. Refer to Remarkable Accomplishments anchor chart (example for teacher reference).
  • Repeated routine: invite students to reflect on their habit of character focus for this lesson.

Homework

HomeworkLevels of Support

A. Preread Anchor Text

  • Students preread chapters 2 and 3 in Hidden Figures in preparation for studying these chapters in the next lesson.

For Lighter Support

  • This is the first lesson in Module 4 that asks students to preread chapters from the anchor text as homework before reading the chapters together in class. Invite students who need lighter support to independently use the Annotating Text protocol to engage more deeply with the text as they preread. Purposes for annotating the text may include the following:
    • Identifying main idea and supporting details (RI.6.2)
    • Summarizing and synthesizing (RI.6.2)
    • Determining author's purpose or point of view (RI.6.6)

For Heavier Support

  • This is the first lesson in Module 4 that asks students to preread chapters from the anchor text as homework before reading the chapters together in class. Invite students who need heavier support to independently use the Annotating Text protocol to engage more deeply with the text as they preread. Purposes for annotating the text may include the following:
    • Defining key vocabulary (L.6.4)
    • Identifying character traits/motivations (RI.6.3)
    • Giving an opinion, reacting, or reflecting

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