Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of Australia, Kenya, and Argentina | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M2:U2:L4

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of Australia, Kenya, and Argentina

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)
  • I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina. (SL.K.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Informational Text Checklist to track students’ progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RL.K.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use evidence from the text as they discuss the weather in three specific locations with their partner using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track progress towards SL.K.1 (see the Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Picture Tea Party Protocol: Mystery Photos (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 21–22, 25–26, and 27–28 (15 minutes)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (10 minutes)

C. Independent and Then Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson follows the same pattern as Lessons 2–3. It invites students to add to their growing body of knowledge and vocabulary to describe weather around the world while engaging in familiar routines and instructional activities.
  • During the Opening, students engage in a familiar instructional practice, the Picture Tea Party protocol, to preview the focus for this lesson’s weather study. At this point in the module, students should be able to engage in this protocol with relative ease.
  • During Work Time A, students complete the focused read-aloud, listening to another section of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. Continue to reinforce the value of revisiting this rich and compelling text multiple times. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4)
  • The familiar and playful role-playing routine in Work Time B allows for oral language development and continued conceptual understanding of weather around the world while also honoring the curiosity and engagement of young learners (SL.K.1).
  • During Work Time C, students practice writing and drawing independently before participating in the class shared writing activity. This builds students’ independence and confidence in responding to the text individually.
  • Lessons 1–3 featured built-out instruction for Goal 3 Conversation Cues. Moving forward, this will appear only as reminders after select questions. Continue using Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. See the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students have now heard multiple excerpts from the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather read aloud. They also have used the information from the text to discuss this content and participate in class shared writing about the content.
  • As in Lessons 2–3, students pair up to discuss the weather and people’s reactions to that weather in the locations studied in the text. In today’s lesson, there is less time allocated for this activity, as the routine is now familiar to students.
  • In Lessons 2–3, students practiced responding to text as they engaged in a class shared writing activity. In this lesson, they further refine these skills by first writing independently in response to the text before contributing to the class shared writing response.
  • In the Closing, students reflect on their progress toward showing responsibility. Since students have had multiple opportunities to reflect on this habit of character, encourage them to offer more specific reflections.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they engage in the partner role-play and discussion during Work Time B. Consider seating those who need help sharing ideas orally close to you to provide additional prompts and reminders of the sentence frames to be used. In addition, prompt students to use the resources around the room, such as the Weather Word Wall and the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • During Work Time C, students may find the independent drawing and writing steps that precede the class shared writing activity to be challenging. Remind them that these should be quick sketches. Prompt students to use the resources around the room, such as the Weather Word Wall, Weather around the World anchor chart, and class interactive map, to support writing and spelling.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 5, students will complete the synthesizing task for the focused read-aloud of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. Consider previewing Lesson 5 to fully understand what is asked of students and to provide any additional support or targeted assistance during this lesson.

In Lesson 5, students will revisit the shared writing they complete during this lesson.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • The mystery photos for the Picture Tea Party protocol and determine groups of three or four students for Work Time A.
    • Responding to Text: Australia, Kenya, and Argentina chart (see supporting materials).
  • Preview the lesson plan for the focused read-aloud of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, in conjunction with the text, to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Distribute:
    • Materials (Sofia paper doll, Jack paper doll, Weather Clothing cards) for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
    • Materials (white board and white board markers) for Work Time C at student workspaces in the whole group area to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Picture Tea Party and Think-Pair-Share protocols. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, class interactive map, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create a slideshow of the Mystery Photos: Australia, Kenya, Argentina images.
  • If students were recorded during the Picture Tea Party and Think-Pair-Share protocols in Unit 1, consider playing these recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Use a search engine like Google to find additional pictures or videos of weather in Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.
  • If you recorded students’ role-play and discussions in Lesson 2, play this video to remind them of what to do.
  • Create the Responding to Text: Australia, Kenya, and Argentina chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1 and K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with multiple opportunities to discuss and interpret the content from On the Same Day in March using multiple language modalities.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to use drawings and words to complete the sentences during the white board interactive writing activity. Reassure students that it is for practice and that it is all right if their responses are not perfect. Model completing the sentence stem with a picture or word that a student would draw or write.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • Briefly review the word will from the Mini Language Dive in Lesson 3. Challenge students to use the word will in Work Times B and C to make predictions about the weather. (Example: “Jack will be in New York City. I predict the weather will be cold.”)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, create individual sentence frame cue cards that students can use for prompting during their discussions. Illustrate each part with icons representing place, weather, and clothing. Prompt students to place their manipulative cards in the frame for additional kinesthetic support.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the partner role-play and discussion, students may need additional visual cues to share key details about the weather in each location. Consider highlighting critical features of the weather in each place by prompting students to refer to the posted mystery photos.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time C, students use white boards and dry erase markers to express their ideas in shared writing. When inviting students to share their responses to the questions posed on the Responding to Text chart, provide options for expression by inviting them to hold up their white boards if they prefer not to share verbally.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During the Opening, students revisit the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. As the protocol becomes more familiar, students may benefit from novel prompts to maintain engagement. Before students share specific weather-related observations about the pictures, optimize relevance by inviting them to make connections to personal experiences.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • willy-willies (T)

Review:

  • details from the text (L)

Materials

  • Mystery Photos: Australia, Kenya, Argentina (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Class interactive map (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Reading Informational Text Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 4; one per pair and one to display)
  • Jack paper doll (from Lesson 1; one per pair and one to display)
  • Weather Clothing cards (from Lesson 2; one set per pair)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Responding to Text: Australia, Kenya, and Argentina chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time C)
  • White boards (one per student)
  • White board markers (black; one per student)
  • Responsibility anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Picture Tea Party Protocol: Mystery Photos (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students that they have been exploring what the weather is like in different places around the world. Tell them that today they will continue to do so by reading about a few specific places.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view Mystery Photos: Australia, Kenya, Argentina. Remind them that they have used this protocol in the past several lessons and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice in your pictures?” (insert student response based on images procured)

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the pictures you saw today and the pictures you saw in the previous two lessons, what do you notice about all of the pictures?” (I notice that the pictures are all from different places. The people and the land look different in all of these places. The people seemed to be dressed differently, because in some places it is sunny and in some places there is still snow on the ground.)

  • Inform students that the pictures they looked at have to do with the three places they will read about today in the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Before students share specific weather-related observations about the pictures, optimize relevance by inviting them to make connections to personal experiences. (Example: “Think for a minute. Was there anything in the photos that you’ve seen before in real life? Was there anything in the photos that you’ve never seen before? Put one hand on your head if you’d like to share.”) (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 21–22, 25–26, and 27–28 (15 minutes)

  • Display On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Remind students that they have been using this text to gather information about the weather in different places around the world. Remind them that they have been learning a lot to help Jack be as prepared as possible for his trip around the world with his family.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What have we learned about the weather in different places around the world so far from reading this text?” (We have learned the weather is different in different places. We have learned that in some places it is sunny and hot, and in some places it is sunny but cold.)

  • Briefly review what the students have already learned about weather in different places by directing their attention to the Weather around the World anchor chart and reviewing it.
  • Tell students that today they will read about three new places, Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.
  • Using the class interactive map, point out Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.
    • Place one or two of the first set of mystery photos where Darwin, Australia, is on the map.
    • Place one or two of the second set of mystery photos where northern Kenya is on the map.
    • Place one or two of the third set of mystery photos where Patagonia, Argentina, is on the map.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about where these three places are on the map?” (They are far away from each other. They are all far away from where we are.)

“What do you wonder about the weather in these three places?” (I wonder if the weather is the same in all three places. I wonder if the weather is like the weather we have here. I wonder if it snows in Darwin, Australia.)

  • While still displaying the text, read pages 25–26 aloud slowly, fluently and without interruption.
  • Direct students’ attention to the term willy-willies in the text. Tell students that a willy-willy is a big burst of air, like a whirlwind, that blows sand, dust, and other debris high into the air.
  • Invite students to swirl their arms and hands around in the air above their heads like the whirlwind that a willy-willy would create.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What details from the words or pictures help you understand what the weather is like in Darwin, Australia?” (I see the leaves of the trees blowing very hard. I see the people’s hair blowing sideways. I see big waves in the water. All of the details show that it is very windy.)

“What do you see people doing and wearing because of the weather?” (I see people coming out of the water. I see the windows being boarded up. It must not be that cold, because I see people wearing shorts and short sleeves.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart, writing down the language they use as accurately as possible. If possible, model referring to the Weather Word Wall as a tool to help when spelling content-related words. Refer to the Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Tell students that now they will learn about the weather in northern Kenya and point to it on the class interactive map.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 21–22 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do the words and pictures in the text tell you about the weather in northern Kenya?” (I see rain clouds. The text says that a lot of rain comes and helps make a river. I see people using the river to play, to wash. It is hot because the people are wearing shorts and short sleeves.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart. Refer to the Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Point to Patagonia, Argentina, on the class interactive map. Tell students that this is the final place they will read about today.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 27–28 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Direct students’ attention to the phrase “catch the wool” and read that sentence again.
  • Explain that the mama is using the phrase “catch the wool” to refer to fluffy white clouds and thick fog.
  • Invite students to “catch the wool” by reaching out and pretending to grab at fluffy white clouds and thick fog.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you learn about the weather in Patagonia, Argentina? What details from the text help you know what the weather is like there?” (There are big, fluffy clouds, because the author writes about them and the picture shows them. The people are wearing tall boots and sweaters, so it must be a little bit cold. There is no rain, and the ground looks dry.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart. Refer to the Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Review the information students gathered today about the weather in Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina, by reading aloud the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What places have similar weather? What places have different weather? What do you notice about the weather across different places in the world on the same day in March?” (Each of these places has different weather. In Darwin, it is very windy. In northern Kenya, it rains a lot in one day. In Patagonia, it is very cloudy, but there is no rain.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group. Consider using the Reading Informational Text Checklist to document student progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4.
  • As students look at the class interactive map and share questions about the three new places, support them in organizing information by writing their questions on chart paper or a white board. Tell students that as you read the book, they can see if their questions are answered. (MMAE)
  • After reading about the weather in three new places, provide options for physical action by inviting students to act out what they might do outside if they were visiting in March. (Examples: Students might pretend to cover their heads from the wind in Darwin, Australia, to open an umbrella in northern Kenya, and to put on tall boots in Argentina.) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: When circulating and listening in during the Think-Pair-Share, scaffold partner conversations as needed. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or a sentence frame. (Example: “I noticed the weather in Patagonia and northern Kenya is different because _______.”) (MMAE)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Offer specific, positive feedback about all they have learned about the weather around the world. (Example: “We have done a great job closely studying our text so we can get as much information as possible to help Jack be prepared for his trip around the world with his family.”)
  • Tell students that, similar to the previous two lessons, now they will get a chance to help Sofia and Jack pick the proper clothing to ensure that Jack is prepared when he visits Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.”
  • Remind students that details from the text means the words and pictures in a text that help us understand what the text is about.
  • Display the Sofia paper doll, Jack paper doll, and Weather Clothing cards.
  • Briefly review the directions for the role-play and discussion:
  1. Pick one of the places studied during the focused read-aloud.
  2. Examine the Weather Clothing cards, naming each item as you examine it.
  3. Consult the Weather around the World anchor chart to find the information about the place you selected.
  4. Pick the clothing cards that are the most appropriate for the weather in the place you chose.
  5. Use the sentence frame “Jack is in _________. The weather is _________, so I picked _________.”
  6. Pass the Sofia paper doll and Jack paper doll to your partner, who will repeat the first five steps using a different location studied during the focused read-aloud.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Once students have partnered up, invite pairs to zigzag like lightning cutting through the sky back to their tables.
  • Once at their tables, direct students’ attention to the Sofia doll, Jack doll, and Weather Clothing cards at their tables.
  • Briefly review the directions and remind students of the sentence frame they should use for their discussion.
  • Invite students to begin their discussions.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist and document progress toward SL.K.1. As needed, redirect students using the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How does our partner role-play add to your understanding of weather around the world? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Before students go out for the partner role-play and discussion, highlight critical features of the weather in each place by prompting them to refer to the posted mystery photos. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As partners interact, identify ELLs who are successfully completing the partner role-play and discussion. Provide specific, positive feedback and take a moment to share their success with the class. (Example: “I noticed Brenda and Melanie were looking at the anchor chart and listening to one another during their discussion. Great work!”)

C. Independent and Then Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (25 minutes)

  • Invite students back to the whole group area.
  • Give them specific, positive feedback regarding their conversations. (Example: “I noticed Demetrius and Taryn consulting the Weather around the World anchor chart as they had their discussion to make sure they were making the best decision about which clothing to choose for Jack.”)
  • Remind students that today they learned about the weather in Darwin, Australia; northern Kenya; and Patagonia, Argentina.
  • Tell students that as partners discussed the clothing they picked for Jack to take on his trip, you heard a lot of great ideas and it’s important to capture those ideas.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Responding to Text: Australia, Kenya, and Argentina chart and tell them that, as a class, they are going to write to capture the ideas they gathered from reading the text.
  • Point to the questions at the top of the Responding to Text chart paper and read them aloud:
    • “What is the weather like in this place?”
    • “What do the people wear and do because of the weather?”
  • Tell students they are going to answer these two questions about the three places they studied today.
  • Point out the white board and white board markers at student workspaces. Tell students that today they are going to get a chance to practice some of the writing themselves.
  • Use the following procedure to complete the shared writing:

1. Point to Part I of the Responding to Text chart paper and read the first sentence aloud:

    • “In Darwin, Australia, the weather is ___________ in March.” 

2. Invite students to use their white board and white board marker to draw a picture or write a word to complete the sentence.
3. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.
4. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the first sentence.
5. Read the second sentence aloud:

    • “The people have to wear ______________.”

6. Invite students to use their white board and white board marker to draw a picture or write a word to complete the sentence.
7. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.
8. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the second sentence.
9. Read the third sentence aloud:

    • “The people like to ____________.”

10. Invite students to use their white board and white board marker to draw a picture or write a word to complete the sentence.
11. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.
12. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the third sentence.
13. Read the three completed sentences aloud, tracking the print as you do.

  • Repeat Steps 1–10 above to complete the shared writing about northern Kenya and Patagonia, Australia.
  • When all shared writing is completed, collect the white boards and white board markers from students.
  • For ELLs: When introducing the white boards, facilitate students’ management of the tools by modeling and practicing how to erase the marker with a white board eraser or paper towel. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: When inviting students to share their responses, provide options for expression by inviting them to hold up their white boards if they prefer not to share verbally. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Responsibility anchor chart.
  • Tell students they are now going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to explain how they showed responsibility during their work today. Remind students that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Provide the sentence frame:
    • “I showed responsibility in my ______ by ________.”
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share and respond to the following question:

“How did you show responsibility during your work today?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I showed responsibility in my work by listening closely during the read-aloud; I showed responsibility in my work by taking turns with my partner during the role-play; or I showed responsibility in my work by taking care of the Sofia and Jack dolls during the role-play.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group.
  • Refocus students whole group and invite a few students to share out.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on showing responsibility. (Example: “I noticed that everyone showed responsibility by taking care of the materials during the partner role-play and discussion today.”)
  • Tell students that in the next lesson, they will have an opportunity to demonstrate their learning about weather around the world by writing about the weather in one of the places they’ve studied.
  • For ELLs: As students complete the sentence stem “I showed responsibility in my ______ by _______,” remind them that the next word will always end in -ing. Prompt students to generate -ing words that might help them complete their thoughts. (Examples: thinking, working, writing)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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