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ELA GK:M2:U2:L5

Speaking, Listening, and Writing: The Weather around the World

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.K.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.K.5: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1a: Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe the weather from a specific place around the world using words and pictures. (W.K.8, SL.K.5, L.K.1a, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use their drawing to support what they say as they share their completed Culminating Task response sheets with a partner. (SL.K.5)
  • At the end of the lesson, review students’ Culminating Task response sheets (that they post on the class interactive map at the end of Work Time B) for evidence of progress toward W.K.8, SL.K.5, L.K.1a, and L.K.6.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Shared Reading: Revisiting Text Responses (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud Culminating Task: Describing the Weather around the World (25 minutes)

B. Partner Share: The Weather around the World (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson invites students to draw on the knowledge they have gained from studying the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather to demonstrate their understanding of the different types of weather that occur in places around the world and what people do in reaction to that weather. (W.K.8, SL.K.5, L.K.1a, L.K.6)
  • During Work Time A, students complete the culminating task for the focused read-aloud, in which they describe the weather in a specific place around the world and what people wear and do because of that weather. (W.K.8, SL.K.5, L.K.1a, L.K.6).
  • During Work Time B, students share their completed culminating task with a partner. They then physically add their writing to the class interactive map to serve as annotation for this interactive document the class has kept throughout the focused read-aloud. (SL.K.5)

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 1–4, students participated in a focused read-aloud, listening to and answering questions about sections of the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. Now, in this final focused read-aloud session, students draw on the information they have gained from their close study of the text and complete a culminating task in which they describe the weather in a specific place around the world.
  • In Lessons 1–4, students worked to answer the first of the Unit 2 guiding questions: “What is weather like around the world?” In the Closing of this lesson, students reflect on how their work in the previous four lessons helped them answer that question.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need additional time to complete the culminating task.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 6, students begin the close read-aloud of Come On, Rain! This close read-aloud will support students as they explore the second guiding question for the unit: “How does weather affect people?” The close read-aloud also will shift the focus of the unit to narrative texts.

In Advance

  • Prepare Culminating Task cards (see supporting materials).
  • Distribute materials for Work Time A (Culminating Task Response Sheet: Weather around the World, pencils, and crayons) at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition to Work Time.
  • Post: Learning targets, Response to Text charts (from Lessons 2–4), class interactive map, Conversations Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If you recorded students participating in the Think-Pair-Share protocol in Unit 1, play this video to remind them of what to do.
  • Students write Culminating Task Response Sheet: Weather around the World using word processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards and K.I.C.10, K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing an opportunity to synthesize their learning from their reading of On the Same Day in March using multiple language modalities. This will reinforce content knowledge and foster language development.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to complete the culminating task independently. Provide additional support, such as modeling and visual cues, as students recall and respond to the text. See the Meeting Students’ Needs column for details.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • Encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, instead of modeling a culminating task based on a location from On the Same Day in March that students did not consider closely, model completing a task based on one of the assigned locations. Assign students who need heavier support the same location. Students can draw from the teacher’s model as they complete their task. Alternatively, work closely with a small group of students who need heavier support. Assign them the same location and complete the task as a shared or interactive experience.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Opening, students gather back together to share responses to the partner discussion question. Students have had to rely on auditory processing during the partner conversation and may benefit if you present the information in multiple forms. Offer alternatives to auditory information by scribing students’ responses on chart paper or a white board.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the shared reading, students are invited to read sentences aloud with you. Students may not feel confident in their reading skills and may benefit from modeling and supported practice. Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more confident reading aloud near students who may not feel as confident.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): When introducing the culminating task, some students may disengage when they learn that the places they are writing and drawing about have been preassigned. Optimize individual choice by highlighting the multiple ways students get to make decisions within the task.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

 No new vocabulary for this lesson.

Materials

  • Response to Text charts (from Lessons 2–4; to display)
  • Class interactive map (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Culminating Task Cards: Weather around the World (one per student)
  • Culminating Task Response Sheet: Weather around the World (one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Thumbtacks (one per student)
  • Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 4; one to display)
  • Jack paper doll (from Lesson 1; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Reading: Revisiting Text Responses (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Response to Text charts (from Lessons 2–4).
  • Remind students that they have learned a lot about the weather in different places around the world, and they wrote about the weather, what people wear, and what people do in each place they studied.
  • Tell students that they are going to review all of the things they learned.
  • Starting with Alberta, Canada, invite a student volunteer to point out on the class interactive map where it is located.
  • After the volunteer has pointed out the location, tell students you are going to read aloud the three sentences about that place.
  • Invite students to follow along as you track the print and join you as you read.
  • Complete this process for each successive location.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“Based on what we read, what do you notice about what the weather is like in different places around the world on the same day in March?” (Responses will vary, but may include: The weather is different in different places even though it is the same day in March; people dress differently around the world for different types of weather; none of the places seemed to have the exact same weather.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. If students need more support to respond to the question appropriately, prompt them to use the Weather around the World anchor chart and Response to Text charts as resources.
  • If productive, cue students to provide reasoning:

“Why do you think that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and invite a few students to share out.
  • Offer specific, positive feedback about students’ work thus far. (Example: “We have gathered a lot of great information about the weather in all of these different places around the world.”)
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who may be more confident reading aloud near students who may not feel as confident. (MMAE)
  • As you gather students back together to share responses to the partner discussion question, offer alternatives for auditory information by scribing students’ responses on chart paper or a white board. (MMR)
  • For ELLS: While discussing each location on the class interactive map, display the corresponding pages of On the Same Day in March. Students may benefit from additional visual reminders.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud Culminating Task: Describing the Weather around the World (25 minutes)

  • Tell student they will now get a chance to write and draw about the weather in one of the places they learned about while reading On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Explain that they will be assigned one of the places to write and draw about and then use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to discuss what they learned about the weather in a specific place. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Distribute the Culminating Task Cards: Weather around the World.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with their partner:

“What did you learn about the weather in this place? What do people wear and do because of the weather in this place?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Read aloud the learning target:

“I can describe the weather from a specific place around the world using words and pictures.”

  • Tell students that now they will return to their tables to draw and write about what they just discussed.
  • Invite students to blow like the wind back to their tables.
  • Point out the Culminating Task Response Sheet: Weather around the World, pencils and crayons already at student workspaces.
  • Tell students they will now draw and write what they just finished talking about with their conversation partner. Review the directions for the task with students:
  1. Fill in the name of the place you are drawing and writing about in the sentence at the top of the page.
  2. Draw a picture that shows the weather in that place, what people wear because of the weather, and what people do because of the weather.
  3. Label your pictures or add a sentence to your drawing.
  • Remind students to use classroom resources such as the Weather around the World anchor chart and Response to Text charts as they draw and write.
  • Invite students to begin drawing, labeling, and writing.
  • Circulate to support students as necessary.
  • As you introduce the culminating task, optimize individual choice by highlighting the ways students get to make decisions within the task. (Example: “Even though you will be assigned one place to write and draw about, there are still many choices you can make. You get to decide what to include in your picture to illustrate the weather, what colors to use, and what words to write.”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Enlarge or project a copy of the Culminating Task response sheet. Choose a page from On the Same Day in March that students did not read closely. Briefly read it aloud and model completing the culminating task, or complete it interactively before students transition to independent work.

B. Partner Share: The Weather around the World (15 minutes)

  • Invite students back to the whole group area and remind them to bring their Culminating Task response sheets with them.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback about their work on the culminating task. (Example: “I noticed that everyone added nice details to their pictures and words to really describe what the weather is like in different places around the world.”)
  • Tell students they will now share their drawing and writing with their conversation partner, and then they will get a chance to add their work to the class interactive map.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B and that they have their Culminating Task response sheets in front of them.
  • Invite students to begin sharing their work with their partner.
  • After each partner has shared, refocus students whole group.
  • Inform students that at the end of the module, they will share their learning about weather around the world with classroom visitors. Tell them that because their writing is so descriptive and detailed, they will add it to the class interactive map so that classroom visitors can also learn about weather around the world.
  • Invite pairs of students to stand up, bring their Culminating Task response sheet, and join you at the class interactive map.
  • Using a thumbtack, place each student’s work near the location on the map about which they wrote.
  • For ELLs: As students interact, jot down samples of effective communication. Also jot down one or two common language errors, such as verb tense or plural nouns. Share each of these with the class, allowing students to take pride in the effective communication and correct the errors. (It is not necessary to identify who communicated well or who made errors. However, some students may benefit from being pulled aside to make it clear.)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Reflection on Guiding Questions (10 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Unit 2 Guiding Questions anchor chart.
  • Tell students they have been working on answering the first guiding question: “What is weather like around the world?”
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What have you learned about weather around the world?” (Responses will vary, but may include: Weather is different in different places around the world; some places have similar weather; the weather in northern Kenya is hot; the weather in Alberta, Canada, is cold and snowy.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and identify a few students to share out whole group.
  • Display the Sofia paper doll and Jack paper doll.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Now that you have learned about the weather in different places around the world, what should Jack make sure to pack for his trip?” (Responses will vary, but may include: warm hat, sandals, scarves, sweaters, shorts, and short-sleeved shirts.)

  • If productive, cue students with a challenge:

“What if Jack was only going to New York City? What would he need to pack? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students that they have learned a lot about the weather around the world, and they have done hard work to make sure Jack is prepared for his trip with his family.
  • Tell students that in the next lesson, they will continue learning about weather and will be introduced to a new text and new characters.
  • As students share out what they have learned so far about weather, foster a sense of community and provide options for physical action by telling students Sofia wants the class to give themselves a special applause. Examples: Make Rain, Fantastic, Hip Hip Hooray (MMAE, MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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