Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of New York City and China | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M2:U2:L3

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: The Weather of New York City and China

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4)
  • I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in New York City and Xian, China. (SL.K.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Informational Text Checklist to track students’ progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RL.K.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use evidence from the text as they discuss the weather in two specific locations with their partner using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track progress towards SL.K.1 (see the Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Picture Tea Party Protocol: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 7–8 and 13–14 (15 minutes)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (15 minutes)

C. Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students have multiple opportunities to acquire and practice using language and vocabulary to describe the weather in different places around the world and what people do and wear because of the weather.
  • During the Opening, students engage in a familiar instructional practice, the Picture Tea Party protocol, to preview the focus for this lesson’s weather study. Giving young students a familiar routine and protocol allows them to process new content in a developmentally appropriate and scaffolded way.
  • During Work Time A, students continue their focused read-aloud, listening to another section of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather and add to a growing body of knowledge and language to describe weather in different parts of the world and what people do to prepare for the weather in those places. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4)
  • Similar to Lesson 2, during Work Time B, students pair up to discuss the weather in specific places around the world and to decide the most appropriate clothing and activities for that weather. Giving young students this familiar routine allows for oral language development and continued conceptual understanding of weather around the world. (SL.K.1)
  • This lesson is the third in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012.Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 3 Conversation Cues encourage students to deepen their thinking. Continue drawing on Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues, introduced in Module 1, and add Goal 3 Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. In Module 3, Goal 4 Conversation Cues are introduced. See the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Revisiting learning targets over several lessons familiarizes students with the language of the target and gives them an opportunity to practice the skills in the target over time.
  • This lesson follows a similar structure to Lesson 2, allowing students to gain new content and grow as learners in a familiar and supported way.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they engage in the partner role-play and discussion during Work Time B. Consider seating students who need help sharing ideas orally close to you to provide additional prompts and reminders of the sentence frames to be used. In addition, prompt students to use the resources around the room, such as the Weather Word Wall and the Weather around the World anchor chart.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 4, students will engage in the final focused read-aloud session of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. After listening to selected sections of the text, they will engage in a partner role-play and discussion activity and then practice writing independently before participating in the class shared writing.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Mystery photos for the Picture Tea Party protocol and determine groups of three or four students for Work Time A.
    • Weather Word Wall card for sleet. Write or type the word in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany it.
    • Responding to Text: New York City and China chart (see supporting materials).
  • Preview the lesson plan for the focused read-aloud of On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, in conjunction with the text, to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Distribute materials (Sofia paper doll, Jack paper doll, Weather Clothing cards) for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Review the Picture Tea Party protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, class interactive map, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create a slideshow of the Mystery Photos: New York City and China images.
  • If students were recorded during the Picture Tea Party protocol in Unit 1, consider playing the recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Use a search engine like Google to find additional pictures or videos of weather in New York City and Xian, China.
  • If you recorded students’ role-play and discussions in Lesson 2, play this video to remind them of what to do.
  • Create the Responding to Text: New York City and China chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1 and K.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with multiple opportunities to discuss and interpret the content from On the Same Day in March, using multiple language modalities.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend some of the language structures and vocabulary in On the Same Day in March. Check frequently for comprehension; re-teach and rephrase as necessary. Guide students through a Mini Language Dive during Work Time A.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • After introducing the word will during the Mini Language Dive, challenge students to use will in subsequent Work Times to make predictions about the weather. (Example: “Jack will be in New York City. I predict the weather will be cold.”)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, create individual sentence frame cue cards that students can use for prompting during their discussions. Illustrate each part with icons representing place, weather, and clothing. Prompt students to place their manipulative cards in the frame for additional kinesthetic support.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the shared writing activity, students may need additional visual cues to share key details about the weather in each location. When preparing the Responding to Text: New York City and China chart, you can highlight critical features of the weather in each place by including a photo to represent each location.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During the focused read-aloud, students may need opportunities to move. Consider providing options for physical action by inviting them to act out what they might do outside if they were visiting New York City or Xian, China, in March.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In Work Time A, students are introduced to the term sleet. Optimize the relevance of this term by inviting them to share real-life experiences with moisture.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • sleet

Review:

  • details from the text

Materials

  • Mystery Photos: New York City and China (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Class interactive map (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Weather Word Wall card (new; teacher-created; one)
  • Weather Word Wall (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Reading Informational Text Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 4; one per pair and one to display)
  • Jack paper doll (from Lesson 1; one per pair and one to display)
  • Weather Clothing cards (from Lesson 2; one set per pair)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Responding to Text: New York City and China chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time C)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Picture Tea Party Protocol: Mystery Photos (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students they have been exploring what the weather is like in different places around the world. Tell them that today they will continue to do so by reading about a few more specific places.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view Mystery Photos: New York City and China. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 2 and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol.
  • Invite students back to the whole group area and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice in your pictures?” (insert student response based on images procured)

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the pictures you saw, what do you think we’ll be learning about today?” (We will learn about different places. We might learn about the clothes that people wear. We’ll learn about the weather in different places.)

  • Inform students that the pictures they looked at have to do with the two places they will read about today in the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • For ELLs: During the protocol, encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather, Pages 7–8 and 13–14 (15 minutes)

  • Display On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.
  • Briefly review that the text explains that even on the same day in March, in different places around the world, the weather might be different because of things like the amount of moisture in the air, how the sun changes the temperature, and how much warm and cool air is present.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can ask and answer questions about weather around the world using the text On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather.”

  • Briefly review what the students have already learned about weather in different places by directing students’ attention to the Weather around the World anchor chart and reading aloud what is on the chart.
  • Tell students that today they will do work that is similar to what they did in the previous lesson. But today they will read about two new places, New York City and Xian, China.
  • Using the class interactive map, point out New York City and Xian, China.
    • Place one or two of the first set of mystery photos where New York City is on the map.
    • Place one or two of the second set of mystery photos where Xian, China, is on the map.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 7–8 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for sleet and follow the same process established in Unit 1: provide its definition (type of moisture that is like snow and like rain; when there is enough moisture in the air for it to rain and the temperature is around the freezing mark, it will sleet), clap out its syllables, use it in a sentence, and place the Word Wall card and picture on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about the weather in this picture of New York City? What do you notice about what the people are wearing and doing?” (I see people wearing hats and scarves. The author wrote that it might snow or sleet. There are people playing basketball outside, but the kids are inside watching.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart, writing down the language they use as accurately as possible. If possible, model referring to the Weather Word Wall as a tool to help when spelling content-related words. Refer to the Weather around the World anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Tell students that now they will read about Xian, China, and point to it on the class interactive map.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 13–14 aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about the weather in this picture of Xian, China? What do you notice about what the people are wearing and doing?” (I see rain and clouds by the mountains. I see flowers and green grass. There are people having a picnic outside and they aren’t bundled up too much, so it must not be that cold.)

  • As students share responses, clarify and capture their ideas on the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • Review the information students gathered today about the weather in New York City and Xian, China, by reading aloud the Weather around the World anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What places have similar weather? What places have different weather? What do you notice about the weather across different places in the world on the same day in March?” (New York City and Paris have similar weather. So far, Canada is the coldest place with the most snow. Thailand is very hot.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out whole group. Consider using the Reading Informational Text Checklist to document students’ progress toward RI.K.1, RI.K.2, and RI.K.4.
  • For ELLs and students who need support with comprehension: When introducing the two new places, optimize relevance by inviting students to share any personal knowledge about the weather in these places. (Example: “Today we are going to read about the weather in New York City and Xian, China. Give a silent thumbs-up if you have heard of or been to one of these places before. Raise a hand if you’d like to share something you have learned about weather in New York City.” Call on students to share. “Now raise a hand if you would like to share something you have learned about weather in Xian, China.”) (MME)
  • After adding sleet to the Weather Word Wall, optimize relevance by inviting students to apply the term as they share real-life examples. (Example: “Think of a time when you have seen or felt a type of moisture that is like both snow and rain. Put your hands on your shoulders if you want to share a time you have seen or felt sleet.”) (MME)
  • When reading about the weather in New York City and Xian, China, provide options for physical action by inviting students to act out what they might do outside if they were visiting in March. (Examples: Students might pretend to go sledding, go ice skating, or watch baseball on TV in New York. Students might pretend to fly a kite, go for a hike, or sit and have a picnic in Xian, China.) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of this key sentence from the text: “What will the wind carry today?” Write and display student responses next to the sentence. Examples:
      • “What does this sentence mean?” (Responses will vary.)
    • Point to the question mark. Ask:
      • “What is this? What does it tell us?” (a question mark; it is a question)
      • “What other word tells us it is a question?” (what, because it is question word)
    • Point to the word will. Ask:
      • “Are the old men and small children wondering about something happening now, something that already happened, or something that hasn’t happened yet?” (something that hasn’t happened yet; we use will to talk about something that happens later)
      • “What does the author mean by ‘what will the wind carry’?” (What kind of weather will come? It is windy, and the wind might blow different things.)
      • “Look at the illustrations. What do you think the wind will carry?” (The wind will carry … rain; kites; clouds.)
      • “What does this tell us about the weather in Xian, China?” (Responses will vary, but may include: Sometimes it is rainy; it is windy; the weather changes.)

B. Partner Role-play and Discussion: Responding to the Text (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Offer specific, positive feedback on how students learned about the weather in two new places around the world. (Example: “Everyone looked very closely at the pictures in the text to notice as many details as possible to help understand what the weather is like in New York City and China.”)
  • Tell students that now they will get a chance to help Sofia and Jack pick the proper clothing to ensure that Jack is prepared when he visits New York City and Xian, China.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use details from the text to describe how people prepare for the weather in New York City and Xian, China.”

  • Remind students that details from the text means the words and pictures in a text that help us understand what the text is about.
  • Display the Sofia paper doll, the Jack paper doll, and the Weather Clothing cards.
  • Review the directions for the role-play and discussion:
  1. Pick one of the two places studied during the focused read-aloud.
  2. Examine the Weather Clothing cards, naming each item as you examine it.
  3. Consult the Weather around the World anchor chart to find the information about the place you selected.
  4. Pick the clothing cards that are the most appropriate for the weather in the place you chose.
  5. Use the sentence frame: “Jack is in _________. The weather is _________, so I picked _________.”
  6. Pass the Sofia paper doll and Jack paper doll to your partner, who will repeat the first five steps using a different location studied during the focused read-aloud.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Once students have partnered up, invite pairs to walk arm-in-arm back to their tables.
  • Once settled, direct students’ attention to the Sofia doll, Jack doll, and Weather Clothing cards at their tables.
  • Briefly review the directions and remind students of the sentence frame they should use for their discussion.
  • Invite students to begin their discussions.
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist and document progress toward SL.K.1. As needed, redirect students using the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • When reviewing directions for the partner role-play, foster collaboration by asking students to share strategies for resolving a disagreement. (Example: “In Lesson 2, you came up with some great strategies for what to do or say if my partner and I don’t agree on the weather clothing. Who can remind us of some things I can do or say if this happens?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Before students begin working independently, provide additional opportunities to practice using the sentence frame as a class. (Example: “What if I chose Alberta, Canada? Then what would I tell my partner?”)
  • For ELLs: As partners interact, identify ELLs who are successfully completing the partner role-play and discussion. Provide specific, positive feedback and take a moment to share their success with the class. (Example: “I noticed Brenda and Melanie were looking at the anchor chart and listening to one another during their discussion. Great work!”)

C. Shared Writing: Responding to the Text (15 minutes)

  • Invite students back to the whole group area.
  • Give them specific, positive feedback regarding their conversations. (Example: “I noticed all partners following our agreed-upon conversation norms as they discussed the weather in the different places we studied today.”)
  • Remind students that today they learned about the weather in New York City and Xian, China.
  • Tell students that as partners discussed the clothing they picked for Jack to take on his trip, you heard a lot of great ideas and it’s important to capture those ideas.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Responding to Text: New York City and China chart and tell them that, as a class, they are going to write to capture the ideas they gathered from reading the text.
  • Point to the questions at the top of the Responding to Text chart paper and read them aloud:
    • “What is the weather like in this place?”
    • “What do the people wear and do because of the weather?”
  • Tell students they will follow the same routine they did in the previous lesson and answer these two questions about the two places they studied today.
  • Tell students that they have already done a lot of thinking to answer those questions. Remind them that during the read-aloud they filled in the Weather around the World anchor chart, and during the partner role-play they discussed these ideas with their partners.
  • Use the following procedure to complete the shared writing:

1. Point to Part I of the Responding to Text chart and read the first sentence aloud:

    • “In New York City, the weather is ___________ in March.”

2. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.

3. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the first sentence.

4. Read the second sentence aloud:

    • “The people have to wear ______________.”

5. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.

6. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the second sentence.

7. Read the third sentence aloud:

    • “The people like to ____________.”

8. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group to complete the sentence.

9. As students share responses, use their ideas to complete the third sentence.

10. Read the three completed sentences aloud, tracking the print as you do.

  • Repeat Steps 1–10 above to complete the shared writing about Xian, China. Refer to the Responding to Text: New York City and China chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • For ELLs and students who need visual support: When preparing the Place column of the Responding to Text chart, highlight critical features by including a photo to represent each location. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Review the phrases “have to” and “like to.” Examples:
    • “What is the difference between ‘have to’ and ‘like to’?” (When you have to do something, you have no choice. When you like to do something, you choose to do it because it makes you happy.)
    • “What are some things you have to do?” (I have to … go to school; go to bed; brush my teeth.)
    • “What are some things you like to do?” (I like to … play; build with blocks; go swimming.)
    • “What do you have to wear when the weather is cold?” (I have to wear … a warm coat; gloves.)
    • “What do you like to do when the weather is cold?” (I like to … play in the snow; drink hot chocolate.)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Gather students back together in the whole group area.
  • Explain that they will now have a chance to reflect on their learning about weather.
  • Briefly review the definition of reflect. Say: “When we reflect, we think about something we have done or learned.”
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is something you have learned about weather around the world?” (Responses will vary, but may include: The weather is different in different parts of the world. In some places, it is cold and snowy. In central Thailand, it is hot and sticky.)

  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to encourage students to think about their thinking:

“What is something you did today that helped you learn about the weather around the world? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (I showed responsibility; I asked questions.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite a few students to share out.
  • Inform students that in the next lesson, they will continue learning about weather around the world so that they can help Jack be prepared for his trip!
  • As students share out what they have learned so far about weather, foster a sense of community and provide options for physical action by telling students Sofia wants the class to give themselves a special applause. (Examples: alligator clap, clam clap, queen’s clap) (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: Invite students to draw information from the Mini Language Dive as they think of something they learned. (Example: I learned that it is windy and rainy in Xian, China.)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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