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ELA GK:M1:U2:L8

Speaking and Listening: Discussing Toy Preferences

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1f: Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can use details from the text to describe the ways we can play with toys. (RI.K.1, RI.K.4)
  • I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the toys we prefer. (SL.K.1, L.K.1f, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist in the Assessment Overview and Resources for this unit to track students’ progress toward speaking and listening standards listed for this lesson.
  • During Work Time C, listen as pairs state their toy preferences and reasoning behind those preferences. Note evidence of progress toward L.K.1f, focusing on those students who have yet to demonstrate mastery of this standard.
  • During Work Time C, listen for students using descriptive language and vocabulary gained from the focused read-aloud sessions and structured discussion (L.K.6). Note those who struggle with this skill and adjust support and instruction during the assessment portion of Lesson 9.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: Toys Galore, Pages 24–30 (15 minutes)

B. Modeling: Discussing Toy Preferences (10 minutes)

C. Structured Play and Discussion: Discussing Toy Preferences (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Sharing Toy Preferences (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • During this lesson, students complete the final focused read-aloud session for Toys Galore. Students continue to acquire vocabulary used to describe the ways they can play with toys.
  • This lesson offers many opportunities to practice speaking and listening about toys, their attributes, and students’ personal toy preferences. This oral language practice supports students in understanding and using the necessary descriptive language for writing about these topics (SL.K.1, L.K.1f, and L.K.6).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Throughout this unit, students have acquired descriptive language and vocabulary to describe classroom toys and how they might play with those toys during focused read-aloud sessions, shared reading experiences, structured discussions, and structured play experiences. This lesson gives students the opportunity to use that descriptive language and vocabulary as they select a preferred classroom toy and describe the toy and the reasoning behind the preference to a classmate.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During Work Time C, look for opportunities to support students as they describe classroom toys and state and describe preference. Students who lack the vocabulary or syntax needed to discuss preference will need additional support. Consider providing extra prompting for use of sentence frames for those who may need it and seating students near the attributes anchor charts.

Down the road:

  • Students complete the unit assessment in the next lesson. They will be assessed on the standards and learning targets featured in this and previous lessons. Consider reviewing the unit assessment before teaching this lesson. The speaking and listening experiences during this lesson directly scaffold students for the writing required on the unit assessment.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display Toys Galore and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Prepare:
    • Toys and Play Word Wall cards for the words hug, snuggle, and cuddle. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Baskets of various classroom toys, such as Legos (or similar), K’nex (or similar), dramatic play items (e.g., puppets, play food, dolls), pattern blocks, stuffed animals, wooden blocks, puzzles, and play dough. Place one basket on each table for Work Time C.
    • Sentence strip chunks for use during the focused read-aloud (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets, “Toys in Our Class” song, Color Words anchor chart, Size Words anchor chart, Shape Words anchor chart, Texture Words anchor chart, Classroom Toys chart, and Conversation Partners chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students singing the “Toys in our Class” song in Lesson 5, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time C: Record students as they discuss in groups to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.A.3, K.I.B.5, K.I.C.9, and K.II.B.3

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the predictable structure of the lesson, the chance to explore, and the opportunity to learn through singing.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to synthesize what they have learned throughout the unit. Provide them with prompting and reminders of their work up to this point. Display their drawings and ask students to recall what they had drawn and written.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • If intermediate students have been strategically partnered throughout the unit, encourage them to choose a different partner today. This will provide an opportunity to gently remove a scaffold to assess their speaking and listening progress.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, allow a strategic partnership to share and discuss the same toy. The student with intermediate or advanced proficiency can model stating their preference and providing a reason. Beginning proficiency students can then describe the same toy with the support of their partners.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Highlight relationships between words by pointing out that hug, snuggle, and cuddle are all different words that mean similar things. Example: “Sometimes we have different words that have the same meaning. It makes it more fun to read and to listen when we’re not using the same word all the time.”
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): As you review all the words on the Toys and Play Word Wall, enhance students’ capacity for monitoring progress by inviting them to reflect on their learning about toys to date. Example: “We have collected so many ways to describe how we play with toys! Remember when we only had a few words on our Toys and Play Word Wall? Turn to a shoulder buddy and tell him or her how you feel about all the learning we have accomplished so far in kindergarten.”
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As student volunteers share in front of the entire class, foster collaboration and community by prompting students to show a shared signal of encouragement. Example: “Christopher just took a risk by teaching the whole class how to play with the puppet. Let’s give Christopher an alligator clap for sharing his great example with us.”

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • hug, snuggle, cuddle (T)

Review:

  • text, describe, details, prefer (L)

Materials

  • “Toys in Our Class” song (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Toys Galore (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Word Wall cards (teacher-created; three; see Teaching Notes)
  • Toys basket (one per table; see Teaching Notes)
  • Color Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Size Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Shape Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Texture Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Classroom Toys chart (from Lesson 1)
  • Language Dive Guide (for ELLs; for teacher reference)
  • Sentence strip chunks (for ELLs)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” Song (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students that they learned the “Toys in Our Class” song in Lesson 5 and they will share this song with the principal in a few days to celebrate their learning.
  • Explain that in order to share with the principal, they need to practice the song a few more times.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted “Toys in Our Class” song.
  • Invite them to sing along as you track the print.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback for remembering the song. (Example: “You all have done a great job remembering this song.”)
  • Remind them to use a clear and loud voice as they sing.
  • Invite students to sing the song again and repeat a few times as time permits.
  • As you invite students to the whole group area, provide differentiated mentors by strategically seating students who may feel more comfortable singing aloud with physical motions near students who may not feel as comfortable. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Students who are less confident verbally may remain silent as the class is singing chorally. If students struggle with the words, encourage them to do their best. Invite an ELL to show leadership by serving as a model for hand gestures or by holding the chart paper.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: Toys Galore, Pages 24–30 (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have been listening to Toys Galore to find words and phrases that describe the actions that toys make and the ways we can play with toys.
  • Refresh students’ memories by reviewing the words collected during the previous lesson on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Using a document camera, display Toys Galore.
  • Tell students that today they will listen to the last section of Toys Galore, so it is important that they are great listeners, finding words and phrases that the author uses to describe the ways we play with toys.
  • Remind students of the learning targets they have been working on. Direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can use details from the text to describe the ways we can play with toys.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target as they recite the “Learning Target” poem.
  • Remind students that details from the text are the words and pictures in the text.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 24–27 aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, pointing to each word as you read it.
  • Reread the second sentence on page 27.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What type of toy is the author writing about here? What are the ways you can play with this type of toy?” (stuffed animal toys that can be hugged, snuggled, and cuddled)

  • Point out that the author shows pictures of stuffed animal toys and that the way we play with these toys is to hug, snuggle, or cuddle them.
  • Invite students to hug, snuggle, or cuddle an imaginary stuffed toy.
  • Place the Word Wall cards and pictures for hug, snuggle, and cuddle on the Toys and Play Word Wall.

“What is the translation of hug in our home languages?” (Yǒngbào in Chinese) Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation to silently repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.

  • While still displaying the text, read the remainder of it. Tell students they have done a great job searching for words that describe the ways we play with toys.
  • Review all the words and phrases that students collected by reading them aloud from the Toys and Play Word Wall. Invite students to follow along as you track the print.
  • As you read the words from the Toys and Play Word Wall that describe the ways toys can be played with, invite students to demonstrate the actions they can take with the toys. For example, as you read stretch, invite students to show how they might stretch a piece of putty, goo, or play dough.
  • For ELLs: Highlight relationships between words by pointing out that hug, snuggle, and cuddle are all different words with similar meanings. Example: “Sometimes we have different words that have the same meaning. It makes it more fun to read and to listen when we’re not using the same word all the time.” (MMR)
  • As you review all the words from the Toys and Play Word Wall, enhance students’ capacity for monitoring progress by inviting them to reflect on their learning about toys to date. Example: “We have collected so many ways to describe how we play with toys! Remember when we only had a few words on our Toys and Play Word Wall? Turn to a shoulder buddy and say how you feel about all the learning we have accomplished so far in kindergarten.” (MMAE)

B. Modeling: Discussing Toy Preferences (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that they know a lot of words to describe classroom toys and that now they will use those words to talk about the toys they prefer.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the toys we prefer.”

  • Briefly review the definitions for participate and prefer. (to take part in; to choose above all others as the best liked or most wanted)
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target.
  • Remind students that they have been learning about ways to describe toys, including words to describe how to play with toys. Explain that they will use all this knowledge when they write about their preferred classroom toy. Tell them that today, they will explore several classroom toys to figure out which one they prefer and will practice discussing their preference with their conversation partner.
  • Model looking at and playing with multiple toys in the toys basket and selecting the one that you prefer. Think aloud about your preference. For example:

1. Pick up several toys and model playing with them.

2. Select a ball and say:

“I prefer the ball over any of the toys in the basket.”

3. Model describing why you prefer the toy using the sentence frame “I prefer ______ because ______.”

4. Think aloud about how you like to play with the toy. Say:

“I like to bounce this ball. I know this ball will bounce high in the air.”

  • Remind students to closely examine their toys as they play with them and to use the attributes anchor charts to help with stating their preferences: Color Words, Size Words, Shape Words, and Texture Words anchor charts.
  • Tell students that now it is their turn to use what they have learned as play experts to talk about their toy preferences.
  • Invite students to jiggle like silly putty back to their tables.
  • For ELLs: In the sentence frame “I prefer ______ over ______,” point out that in this case, over means instead of or in place of. Prompt students to practice using the word. Example: “Roberto, do you prefer juice over milk?”
  • As you model discussing toy preferences, create an accepting classroom climate by legitimizing multiple perspectives. Example: “If I prefer blocks, it is not bad for someone else to prefer puzzles. We might not prefer the same things as others, and that is okay.” (MME)

C. Structured Play and Discussion: Discussing Toy Preferences (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the toys baskets at their tables.
  • Allow 10 minutes of free play and exploration time. Say:

“Explore the toys in your basket. Remember to think about the different ways you can play with these toys. Use this exploration time to figure out which toy you prefer to play with.”

  • As students play, circulate and prompt students to explore multiple toys. Ask which toys they prefer, why they prefer them, and how they play with the toys they prefer.
  • Provide time reminders and prompt students to pick the toy they prefer as free play and exploration time ends.
  • After 10 minutes, refocus students’ attention by reviewing the steps for the paired discussion:

1. Tell your partner which toy you picked: “I picked ________.”

2. Explain to your partner why you prefer the toy: “I prefer ________ because ________.”

3. Explain to your partner how you play with the toy.

  • Invite students to take their preferred toy with them and find their conversation partner. Remind them that they can see who their partner is by reviewing the Conversation Partners chart.
  • Once students have found their partners, invite partner A to begin the discussion.
  • Circulate as pairs discuss and listen for students using sentence frames to describe their toy preference. Prompt students to use the sentence frames as necessary.
  • Encourage students to use the Toys and Play Word Wall, Classroom Toys chart, and anchor charts to help with vocabulary and descriptive language.
  • Prompt partner B to share.
  • Encourage students to make a bridge with their arms once both partners have shared.
  • Before students choose a toy from the basket, support them to manage frustration by reminding them of strategies they can use if a peer selects a preferred toy. Examples:
    • “You and a classmate may both prefer the same toy. What can you do if a classmate picks the toy you wanted?”
    • “Think of a first and second choice toy that you can study. That way, if a classmate picks your first choice, you can still select your second choice without getting upset.” (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing Toy Preferences (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to transition back to whole group by partnerships.
  • Remind them that they have had a lot of practice discussing their toy preference and, in previous lessons, drawing and labeling different classroom toys.
  • Remind students that they have also learned a lot of words to describe the ways we can play with toys; point out those vocabulary words on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Invite a few students to share out what their preferred toy is and teach the whole group how to play with that toy.
  • Briefly model how students will share. Say:

“I prefer the ball because I like things that bounce. I like to play with the ball by bouncing it really high.”

  • Mimic the action of bouncing a ball and invite students to do the same.
  • Call on a few volunteers to share.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on their hard work. (Example: “You have learned a lot over the last several lessons about describing, drawing, and labeling toys to help you become play experts.”)
  • Explain that students will use their play expertise to write and draw about their toy preferences in coming lessons.
  • For ELLs: Call on a student who has made progress after having struggled with the learning targets. Allow her a chance to proudly demonstrate the progress she has made in front of the class.
  • As student volunteers share their preferred toy, foster collaboration and community by prompting classmates to show a shared signal of appreciation. Example: “Christopher just took a risk by teaching the whole class how to play with the puppet. Let’s give Christopher an alligator clap for sharing his great example with us.” (MME)

There are no new supporting materials for this lesson.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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