Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Selecting, Writing and Talking About Our Classroom Toy Preferences | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M1:U2:L9

Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Selecting, Writing and Talking About Our Classroom Toy Preferences

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.K.1: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can write about the classroom toy I prefer. (W.K.1, L.K.6)
  • I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the classroom toy I prefer. (SL.K.1)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Informational/Explanatory Writing and Speaking and Listening Checklists in the Assessment Overview and Resources for this unit to track students’ progress toward the standards listed for this lesson.
  • During Work Time A, watch and listen for evidence of students’ following the Conversation Norms during the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol.
  • Collect students’ completed Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording forms at the end of the lesson and assess their writing samples for progress toward W.K.1. and L.K.6. Use this information to inform instruction on writing in upcoming lessons.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” Song (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Selecting, Writing, and Talking about the Classroom Toy I Prefer (25 minutes)

B. Shared Writing: Letter Back to the Principal (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Although this is a formal assessment of W.K.1, students should experience the lesson as routine. Do not overemphasize the assessment; instead, use this as an opportunity to continue to gather meaningful data.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Throughout this unit, students have learned about the idea of preference and practiced expressing preferences. This lesson invites them to continue to think about the idea of preference, select a preference, and then write about it.
  • Students continue to demonstrate their ability to participate in collaborative conversations, a skill they have practiced throughout this module.
  • Throughout the unit, students have engaged in inquiry about toys and toy attributes. In the Letter Back to the Principal (Work Time B) of this lesson, students recount their learning from the entire unit.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need support writing the name of the toy they prefer on the Unit 2 Assessment recording form. Encourage them to try on their own and offer dictation support as needed, as named in the language of the W.K.2 standard.

Down the road:

  • This lesson is Part I of the Unit 2 Assessment. In this portion of the assessment, students select and write the name of the classroom toy they prefer. Lesson 10, which is Part II of the Unit 2 Assessment, builds on this lesson. Students use pictures and words to describe their preferred toy. They also orally explain how they like to play with the toy, which the teacher dictates in Part II of the assessment.
  • Confirm the principal’s visit to the class during the next lesson. If the principal is not available, consider videotaping students reading the Letter Back to the Principal and singing the “Toys in Our Class” song.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Unit 2 Assessment. For Part I, modify the recording form to match classroom toys specific to your context. Copy Part I and Part II of the assessment back to back on one sheet of paper. Part I is used in this lesson, and Part II is used in Lesson 10.
    • Toy Preferences Data chart (see supporting materials).
    • Chart paper for the Letter Back to the Principal (see supporting materials).
  • Distribute materials for Work Time A at student tables.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. See Classroom Protocols.
  • Post: Learning targets, “Toys in Our Class” song, Conversation Norms anchor chart, and Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Video record the whole group singing the “Toys in our Class” song with actions and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch and practice at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video apps or software.
  • Work Time B: If the Letter from the Principal was an email, students reply with an email.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.A.3, K.I.B.5, K.I.C.9, and K.II.B.3

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 1¬–8. Students will use a recording form to identify a toy that they prefer.
  • The previous three lessons involved scaffolding and collaborative work, but students work primarily independently during this assessment. This may be a leap for some students. In preparation for the activity, have students begin to think about their toy preferences before singing the “Toys in Our Class” song. (Example: “While we sing the song, think about the kinds of toys that you prefer.”)
  • Make sure that all students understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. See additional support in the lesson.
  • Take note of what seemed to be most challenging about independently completing the assessment. Determine ways to further scaffold and support students in preparation for future assessments based on their challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): As you model directions for the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form, provide options for organizational methods by demonstrating how to keep track of the word you want to write. Example: “I circled the picture of play dough, and now I want to write that word. Look! The word I want is right underneath the picture I circled. I am going to underline the word so I can remember which one it is. Now, as I write each letter of play dough, I will cross out the letter I use so I can focus on the next one.”
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): To help students express their ideas in the Unit 2 Assessment, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers, colored pencils) and writing tools (Examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards).
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As you ask students to think about and draw a “glow” and a “grow,” emphasize effort and improvement rather than relative performance. Example: “Everyone in kindergarten is great at some things and working on getting better at other things, including me! One thing I’m growing at is listening to others, especially when a lot of students need my attention. I sometimes forget to listen, but seeing the Conversation Norms chart helps me remember.”

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • data, reflect (L)

Review:

  • prefer (L)

Materials

  • “Toys in Our Class” song (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form (one per student)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Unit 1)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Toy Preferences Data chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A)
  • Letter Back to the Principal (new; co-created with students during Work Time B)
  • Whiteboard and whiteboard markers (recommended; one each per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” Song (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Tell them that they are going to share the “Toys in Our Class” song with the principal. Today they will practice the words and learn movements to the song so they are prepared for their presentation.
  • Invite students to stand up and direct their attention to the posted “Toys in Our Class” song.
  • Explain that they will sing each verse, or chunk, of the song, and then you will teach them a motion that matches the words in that part of the song.
  • Sing the first verse together.
  • Demonstrate the motions associated with a few key words in that verse. Example: For the word toys, students can select a motion associated with a favorite classroom toy (e.g., rolling play dough, building with blocks, painting, etc.) When they sing the word fun, they may jump up and down in place.
  • If needed, remind students how to do the motions safely and courteously.
  • Repeat the first verse and add in the motions.
  • Continue with the second verse, this time adding motions to the words play dough, roll, and squish.
  • Repeat this process of adding motions for key words in each verse: paint, slip, slide, blocks, build, stack, puppets, move, talk, and imaginations.
  • Sing the entire song through again with all the motions.
  • Offer students specific positive feedback on their singing. Example: “I noticed that you thought hard about the motions that best match the actions.” Invite them to sit back down.
  • For ELLs: Ask a student to lead the group in singing the “Toys in Our Class” song. This will give the student a sense of ownership and belonging within the classroom culture and community.
  • As you invite students to the whole group area, provide differentiated mentors by strategically seating students who may feel more comfortable singing aloud with physical motions near students who may not feel as comfortable. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Selecting, Writing, and Talking about the Classroom Toy I Prefer (25 minutes)

  • Tell students that they have done a wonderful job of exploring toys and becoming toy experts in the past few weeks.
  • Briefly explain that they will spend a bit of time in today’s lesson thinking about and selecting the classroom toy they most prefer.
  • Briefly review the definition of the word prefer. (to like one thing more than something else)
  • Provide familiar examples from previous lessons as necessary:

“I prefer summer to winter.”

“If I have to choose between chocolate or vanilla ice cream, I prefer chocolate.”

  • Remind students that people often prefer different things, and that is okay.
  • Display the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form.
  • Read the first question aloud and track each word.
  • Ask students to think about what the question is asking them. Tell them when they have an idea, they should put their hand on their head.
  • Invite a student who is ready to share his or her thinking. If needed, guide students to understand that this question is asking them which of the toys in the classroom they prefer, or like better than the others.
  • Tell students that they should watch you closely as you show them how to complete the recording form.
  • As you complete the first portion of the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form, think aloud for students, focusing specifically on selecting a toy. For example:
  • Say:

“Hmmm … I have to think about that question for a moment. I like all of these classroom toys, but the one toy I am always most excited to play with is the play dough. I prefer play dough.”

  • Read the prompt that follows the question: “Circle your choice.”
  • Say:

“After you think about which classroom toy you prefer, you will then use a pencil to circle that toy.”

  • Model circling the picture of play dough.
  • Proceed to the sentence stem at the bottom of the page. Read it aloud: “I prefer_______.”
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can write about the classroom toy I prefer.”

  • Say:

“This is where you get to try to write the name of the toy you prefer. That will be fun and maybe even a bit challenging!”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • As you complete the second portion of the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form, think aloud for students, focusing specifically writing the name of the toy. For example:
  • Say:

“I can just look right here at the top of the paper to help me write. The word is spelled for me!”

  • Write the word play dough, using the word at the top of the recording form as a guide.
  • Tell students that it is now their turn to try.
  • Remind them that they should really think hard about the toy they prefer.
  • Tell students that they will now return to their tables and think about and circle their own classroom toy preference.
  • Dismiss small groups of students to walk to their tables.
  • As they complete the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form, circulate and support students as needed to understand the questions and prompts and offer encouragement. However, be sure students do the thinking about the task on their own and that they decide on their preference independently.
  • After about 10 minutes, gather students back together whole group. Remind them to bring their Unit 2 Assessment recording form with them.
  • Tell students that they are now going to tell a classmate about the classroom toy they prefer.
  • Direct their attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the classroom toy I prefer.”

  • Again, invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target.
  • Display the Conversation Norms anchor chart. Briefly review the norms as necessary.
  • Tell students that they are going to share their preferences using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lessons 1 and 4. Review as necessary. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Reference the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart.
  • Have students find a partner and stand back-to-back with him or her, being respectful of space.
  • Ask the following question and give students 30 seconds to consider how they will respond:

“What classroom toy do you prefer?”

  • Provide a sentence frame for students to use when sharing their response: “I prefer _____.”
  • Invite students to turn face-to-face to share their responses.
  • After students have shared, tell them that they are now going to collect some data to see which toys their classmates prefer.
  • Briefly explain that data is a collection of information. The class is going to collect or gather information about the classroom toys they prefer.
  • Display the Toy Preferences Data chart. Tell students that when you call the name of the toy they prefer, they should quietly stand up and stay standing while the class counts.
  • Call out the first toy on the data chart. Invite all students who selected this toy to stand up. Invite the rest of the class to chorally count aloud.
  • Once all students in that group are counted, invite them to sit back down in their space.
  • Repeat with the other toys on the data chart, one at a time, until all the data has been collected.
  • Engage in a brief conversation about the data by asking:

“What can we learn about the toys our class prefers based on this chart?” (We prefer ____ more than ______. The most students prefer_____.)

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by giving an example:

"Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Explain that they will now write a letter back to the principal and share this data with him or her.
  • For ELLs: Repeat the instructions for students who would benefit from hearing them multiple times.
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension before students begin the task. Ask them if they have any questions, or if there is something they are not sure about, before beginning the task. Ask a student: “What are you going to do first? What will you do next?”
  • For ELLs: Remind students that even though the worksheet may look a little different, all they need to do is think about their preferences and label the toys, the same thing they have done such a great job with, in English, all week.
  • As you explain the task, facilitate coping and flexibility by assuring students that their preference might change in the future, and that is okay. Example: “Today you are going to draw and write about a toy you most prefer in kindergarten. The toy you choose does not have to be your favorite forever. Your preference might change in the future, and that is okay. I am just interested in what you are most excited to play with today.” (MME)
  • As you model directions for the Unit 2 Assessment, Part I recording form, provide options for organizational methods by demonstrating how to keep track of the word you want to write. Example: “I circled the picture of play dough, and now I want to write that word. Look! The word I want is right underneath the picture I circled. I am going to underline the word so I can remember which one it is. Now, as I write each letter of play dough, I will cross out the letter I use so I can focus on the next one.” (MMR)
  • To help students express their ideas in the Unit 2 Assessment, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers, colored pencils) and writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). (MMAE)

B. Shared Writing: Letter Back to the Principal (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have been working to become play experts as the principal asked, and they have a lot of information about toys to share with the principal. Say:

“Now that we have a better understanding of toys and toy preference, we can write a letter to the principal.”

  • Display the Letter Back to the Principal and follow these steps to complete it with students:

1. Present the first part of the letter to students and read it aloud:

    • “Dear Principal. We have had so much fun becoming toy experts! We became experts by ________.”

2. Ask students to think about all the ways they have become toy experts. Say: “One of the things we did was read about toys.” Ask:

“What else did you do to become toy experts?”

3. Ask students to put a thumb up when they have an idea. Call on a couple of students to share their ideas.

4. As students share, capture their ideas on the Letter Back to the Principal.

5. Repeat steps 1–4 for the remaining components of the letter.

  • Read the letter aloud once it is completed. Invite students to follow along as you track the print.
  • Explain that the letter includes a lot of great information about what they have learned about toys and preferences.
  • Tell students they will create drawings in the next lesson to show how they like to play with the toy they prefer. Explain that they will also share those with the principal so that the principal can learn more about their toy preferences.
  • As you ask students to reflect on what they did to become toy experts, activate background knowledge by prompting them to take a look around the room at the anchor charts and/or display photos of relevant classroom activities on the document camera. (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the whiteboards and whiteboard markers.
  • Explain that now students will reflect on some of their learning, specifically their conversations.
  • Remind them that reflect means to think back on something they have done.
  • Display and briefly review the Conversation Norms anchor chart.
  • Tell students to think about one of the norms on the Conversation Norms anchor chart that they are doing well. Briefly explain that this is their “glow” norm.
  • When they have selected a norm, they should use the pictures on the chart to help them draw it.
  • Give students a few minutes to draw their “glow” norm on the whiteboard.
  • Invite students to share their norm with a shoulder partner using the frame “My ‘glow’ norm is_____.”
  • Repeat this process with a “grow” norm. This is something they want to improve on.
  • Offer specific positive feedback to students on their reflection. (Example: “I noticed you all thought carefully and honestly about what you are doing well and what you might like to get better at.”)
  • If time permits, sing the “Toys in Our Class” song and practice the motions from the Opening.
  • For ELLs: Self-reflection is a meta-cognitive skill that may be challenging to comprehend and achieve without mastery of the language. If students struggle to think of a norm with which they are doing well, offer suggestions. Example: “Briana, I have noticed you have done such a great job taking turns talking lately!”
  • As you ask students to think about and draw a “glow” and a “grow,” emphasize effort and improvement rather than relative performance. Example: “Everyone in kindergarten is great at some things and working on getting better at other things, including me! One thing I’m growing at is listening to others, especially when a lot of students need my attention. I sometimes forget to listen, but seeing the Conversation Norms chart helps me remember.” (MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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