Reading Informational Text and Writing and Drawing: Describing Classroom Toys | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M1:U2:L7

Reading Informational Text and Writing and Drawing: Describing Classroom Toys

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.4: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • L.K.5c: Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are colorful).
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can use details from the text to describe the ways we can play with toys. (RI.K.1, RI.K.4)
  • I can use pictures and words to describe a classroom toy. (W.K.2, L.K.5c, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, listen for students to identify words that describe toys and the actions that toys make.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Would You Prefer? (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: Toys Galore, Pages 12–23 (15 minutes)

B. Modeling: Examining and Drawing Toys (10 minutes)

C. Independent Practice: Examining and Drawing Toys (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Sharing Drawings (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • During this lesson, students have multiple opportunities to acquire and practice using language and vocabulary to describe toy attributes and the ways they play with toys.
  • During the Opening, students practice stating and supporting preference by engaging in the familiar routine of the Would You Prefer? game. Providing young students with this familiar routine allows for oral language development and continued conceptual understanding of preference.
  • During Work Time A, students listen to another section of Toys Galore and add to a growing vocabulary of descriptive language for ways to play with toys.
  • Similar to Lesson 6, during Work Time C students practice selecting and drawing a toy. They are encouraged to zoom in on specific attributes, supporting their development of observational skills and creating detailed drawings. In addition, students are encouraged to label their drawings, pulling from their growing vocabulary of descriptive language (W.K.2, L.K.5c, and L.K.6).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This lesson builds on students’ knowledge and understanding of the attributes of various classroom toys.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they draw and describe classroom toys. Those who have yet to master the descriptive language of toy attributes will need support. Consider seating those students close to the Toys and Play Word Wall and the attributes anchor charts.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 9, students will complete the unit assessment, in which they will be assessed on the standards and learning targets from this lesson. Consider previewing the unit assessment before teaching this lesson to determine which students might need additional support and prompting.

 

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display Toys Galore and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Prepare:
    • Would You Prefer? index cards: Write two choices on index cards, using one card for each choice. Label one choice as “A” and one choice as “B.” See supporting materials from Lesson 5 and include new choices in this lesson.
    • Toys and Play Word Wall cards for the words whirl, twirl, roll, push, spin, race, and dribble. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Baskets of various classroom toys, such as Legos (or similar), K’nex (or similar), dramatic play items (e.g., puppets, play food, dolls), pattern blocks, stuffed animals, wooden blocks, puzzles, and play dough. Place one basket on each table for Work Time C.
    • Drawing and Labeling: Teacher Model on chart paper.
  • Distribute materials for Work Time C at student tables.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. See Classroom Protocols.
  • Post: Learning targets, Color Words anchor chart, Classroom Toys chart, Size Words anchor chart, Shape Words anchor chart, and Texture Words anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students as they discuss in pairs to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6 and K.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the predictable structure of the lesson and the playful way in which new vocabulary is introduced.
  • Some ELLs may find it challenging to discuss why they prefer one choice over another. Allow students to keep it simple and to use an attribute as a reason. Example: “I prefer puppets because they are soft.”

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • In preparation for the unit’s assessment, observe students’ success working independently. Assess their comfort with using the anchor charts and resources in the room. Focus instruction on developing strategies to foster independence. (Example: Ernesto says he is finished, but he has not attempted to label his drawing. Remind him to label and direct him to the Toys and Play Word Wall.)

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time A, some students may see several unfamiliar toys in Toys Galore. Before the focused read-aloud, consider previewing a few of the toys and how they work. This will minimize confusion, and it will help students follow the text more closely.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Students may benefit from visual guidance in organizing the drawing/writing task. During Work Time B, explicitly highlight each step of the task, writing a simple checklist with illustrations on chart paper. Provide individual copies of this checklist for students as they go out to complete the writing and drawing task during Work Time C.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): This lesson provides many opportunities for students to physically engage and dramatize ideas. Help them understand the logic behind the expectation to move safely in the classroom. Example: “As we zigzag like racecars back to tables, what might we want to think about in terms of keeping our bodies safe? How will this help us do our best learning?”
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Throughout the lesson, encourage effort and persistence by providing frequent, timely, and specific positive feedback to individual students. (MME)

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • details from the text (L)
  • whirl, twirl, roll, push, spin, race, dribble (T)

Review:

  • text, describe, prefer (L)

Materials

  • Would You Prefer? index cards (from Lesson 5; class set)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Toys Galore (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Word Wall cards (teacher-created; seven; see Teaching Notes)
  • Toys basket (one per table; see Teaching Notes)
  • Drawing and Labeling Toys: Teacher Model (blank; one to display; from Lesson 6)
  • Color Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Classroom Toys chart (from Lesson 1)
  • Drawing and Labeling Toys: Student Response Sheet (blank; one per student; from Lesson 6)
  • Shape Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Size Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Texture Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Would You Prefer? (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Remind students that they have been playing the game called Would You Prefer?, in which they decide what they prefer among a few choices.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does the word prefer mean? What does it mean to prefer something?” (to like one thing more than something else)

  • Tell students that today they are going to play the game again.
  • Briefly review the directions for the game and expectations for safe and courteous movement in the classroom. Remind students which side of the room they should travel to for “A” preferences and which side for “B” preferences and that they should stay in their spots if they prefer neither choice.
  • Read the first set of choices from the Would You Prefer? index cards and instruct students to pick their preference and move to the designated spot in the room.
  • Once students have moved, elicit their thoughts as to the reasons for their preferences.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Why do you prefer______?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Encourage students to use a sentence frame: “I prefer _______ because ______” or “I like ______ best because ______.”
  • Repeat with subsequent sets of choices for as long as time permits.
  • For ELLs: Model and think aloud providing reasons for preferences. Use the sentence frame: “I prefer ______ because ______.” Example: “Why do I prefer chocolate? Maybe because it is sweet and I like the taste. So I can say, ‘I prefer chocolate because I like the sweet taste.’” (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: Toys Galore, Pages 12–23 (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have been listening to Toys Galore to find words and phrases that describe the actions that toys make and the ways we can play with toys.
  • Refresh students’ memories by reviewing the information collected during the previous lesson on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Using the document camera, display Toys Galore.
  • Tell students that today they will listen to another section of Toys Galore and will mimic the actions that toys make when we play with them so that they are really experts on them.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can use details from the text to describe the ways we can play with toys.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target as they recite the “Learning Target” poem.
  • Remind students that details from the text are the words and pictures in the text.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 12–18 of Toys Galore aloud slowly, fluently, and with expression, pointing to each word as you read it.
  • Stop after reading page 18. Say:

“I see a lot of toys with wheels on these pages. The author uses the words whirling and twirling to describe the actions these toys with wheels might make.”

  • Reread page 18.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does whirling mean? What does twirling mean?” (going around and around)

  • Tell students that they are going to pretend to be a toy that whirls and twirls. Solicit their ideas as to what that might look like.
  • Remind students of safe and courteous movements. Invite them to whirl and twirl like the toys with wheels do.
  • Place the Word Wall cards and pictures for whirl and twirl on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did the author show us about the ways we can play with toys with wheels?” (whirl, twirl, roll, push, spin)

  • Define the words roll, push, and spin for students as necessary.
  • Place the Word Wall cards and pictures for roll, push, and spin on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • While still displaying the text, continue reading until page 23.
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

“I see more toys that are balls and ones that have wheels. What do the details in the text show us about how we can play with these toys?” (racing toys with wheels, dribbling balls)

  • Explain that the author shows pictures of toys with wheels to race and balls to dribble.
  • Define the words race and dribble for students as needed.
  • Place the Word Wall cards and pictures for race and dribble on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Invite students to choose one other toy action to mimic in their spots.
  • Tell students they will finish the last section of Toys Galore in the next lesson, and there will be another chance for them to be word detectives.
  • For ELLs: Prompt students to say whirl and twirl as they perform the actions of whirling and twirling. Have students do the same with other words corresponding to actions. This will facilitate their acquisition of the vocabulary by strengthening the link between the actions and the words. Example: “Notice how the word whirl kind of sounds like the wind as you spin around. Try spinning and saying, ‘whirrrrrl!’” (MMAE)

B. Modeling: Examining and Drawing Toys (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have done a lot of reading and discussing to learn ways to describe the toys in the classroom and that they will continue to use that knowledge to help them make drawings of classroom toys.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can use pictures and words to describe a classroom toy.”

  • Ask one or two students to remind the class what the word describe means.
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the learning target.
  • Remind them that to describe a classroom toy, they need to include a lot of details, which will require closely examining the toys.
  • Similar to the previous lesson, model selecting a toy from the toys basket and closely examining it.
  • As you closely examine the toy, think aloud about its attributes, focusing specifically on color, and then draw what you see. For example:

1. Select a puppet.

2. Closely examine the puppet by turning it over several times in your hand.

3. Say:

“I notice this puppet has several colors: blue, green, red. I notice those colors are in specific places on the puppet. I’m going to draw the colors I see and where I see them.”

4. Draw the puppet and its respective colors on the posted Drawing and Labeling Toys: Teacher Model.

5. Model using the Color Words anchor chart to locate the color words and label them on the drawing.

6. Model labeling the toy using the Classroom Toys chart. Say:

“I want to label my drawing so when people look at it they know it’s a puppet. I’m going to use the Classroom Toys chart to help me spell the word puppet.”

  • Remind students to closely examine their toys, use the anchor charts to help with labeling, and add many details to their drawings.
  • Tell students that now it is their turn to use what they have learned as play experts to practice making detailed classroom toy drawings.
  • Invite students to zigzag like racecars back to their tables.
  • For ELLs: Students will have discussed the meaning of describe for several days by now. Check for comprehension by cold calling an intermediate proficiency ELL first. Ask other ELLs the same question to assess mastery of this concept among the class. For an alternate means of assessing comprehension, ask a student to describe something in the room.
  • As you model describing the puppet with words and pictures, guide organization by highlighting each step of the task. Do this by writing a simple checklist with illustrations on chart paper, such as:
    • Examine (picture of magnifying glass)
    • Draw (picture of marker and paper)
    • Label (picture of pencil and “ABC”)

  (MMR)

C. Independent Practice: Examining and Drawing Toys (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the toy baskets at their tables.
  • Allow students 5 minutes of free play and exploration time. Say:

“Explore the toys in your basket. Remember, as play experts, you’re going to have to create detailed drawings, so use your exploration time to really learn about the toys.”

  • After 5 minutes, direct students’ attention to the Drawing and Labeling Toys: Student Response Sheet at their tables.
  • Briefly review the directions for the task:

1. Select a toy.

2. Closely examine the toy.

3. Draw the toy, paying close attention to what you observed when you closely examined it.

4. Use the Shape Words anchor chart, Color Words anchor chart, Size Words anchor chart, Texture Words anchor chart, and Toys and Play Word Wall to help with your drawing and label.

  • Invite students to select a toy from the basket and begin.
  • As students draw, circulate and provide support as needed. Remind them to closely examine the toys to make sure their descriptions and drawings include a lot of details. Point out the resources in the room that students may use to assist them: the attributes anchor charts, Classroom Toys chart, and Word Wall.
  • If students are stuck, ask them to share their idea with you. Help them problem-solve by discussing how they might show their idea with a simple picture. Conversely, if a student finishes quickly, ask how he or she might add some details to the picture.
  • Give students frequent time reminders and encouragement as they draw. Prompt those who need extra support to use the anchor charts and the Word Wall for help with descriptive language and vocabulary.
  • Provide options for executive functions to help students describe the toy by offering individual checklists with words and pictures that include:
    • Examine
    • Draw
    • Label 

    (MMAE)

  • To help students express their ideas in the drawing and writing task, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers, colored pencils), writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards), and scaffolds (examples: picture cues, shared writing). (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Sharing Drawings (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to transition back to whole group by tables. Remind them to bring their drawings with them.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to share their drawing with a classmate. Remind students that they used this protocol in Lesson 2. Review as necessary. Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Ask students to pair up with their conversation partner and turn back-to-back.
  • Invite students to turn face-to-face and begin sharing their drawings.
  • Circulate and listen as students share. Listen for them to use the descriptive language and vocabulary from the Word Wall and attributes anchor charts to discuss toy attributes and the ways to play with toys.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

"Can you say more about that?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Offer students specific positive feedback on their drawings. (Example: "I noticed the amount of detail all of you included in your drawings. This shows me you are closely examining your toys.")
  • For ELLs: If students make any errors using verb tenses, discuss the error as a class and guide the students to correct it. Example: "I noticed some of you were saying, 'I describe a puppet.' When you are talking about something you have finished, it is correct to say, 'I described a puppet.'"
  • As students share with their partner, encourage effort and persistence by providing frequent, timely, and specific positive feedback to individual students. (MME)

There are no new supporting materials for this lesson.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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