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ELA G2:M1:U1:L3

Focused Read-aloud, Session 2: What Does School Mean to You?

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.2.1: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.6: Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
  • W.2.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.2.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL2.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about what school is and why it is important using key details from What Does School Mean to You? (RI.2.1, RI.2.6, W.2.8)
  • I can speak one at a time when participating in conversations with my classmates. (SL.2.1, SL.2.1a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Times A and C, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress toward SL.2.1 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Establishing a Discussion Norm: Speak One at a Time (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 2: What Does School Mean to You? (15 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: What Is School? Notebook (10 minutes)

C. Making Observations: Evidence in Our Classroom (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Shared Writing: Responding to Kindergarteners (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson opens by introducing students to the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart. Students add to this anchor chart throughout the module to help them learn behaviors for successful classroom discussions. As they learn and practice the discussion norms, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to collect data on SL.2.1, SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, and SL.2.1c.
  • This lesson is the first in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 1 Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions teachers can ask students to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O’Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 1 Conversation Cues encourage all students to talk and be understood. As the modules progress, Goal 2, 3, and 4 Conversation Cues are gradually introduced. See the Tools page for the complete set of cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper. Examples of the Goal 1 Conversation Cues you will see in the next two units are (with expected responses):
    • After any question that requires thoughtful consideration:

 “I’ll give you time to think and write or sketch.”

 “I’ll give you time to discuss this with a partner.”

    • To help students share, expand, and clarify thoughts:

 “Can you say more about that?”

 “Sure. I think that _____.”

 “Can you give an example?”

“OK. One example is _____.”

 “So, do you mean _____?”

 “You’ve got it./No, sorry, that’s not what I mean. I mean _____.”

  • In Work Time A, students complete another focused read-aloud of What Does School Mean to You? Recall that over the next couple of lessons, students complete focused read-alouds, answering text-dependent questions about the text after hearing it read aloud. These questions are found directly in the body of the lesson; they have a skill-based focus for reading and include fewer questions than a close read-aloud (RI.2.1, RI.2.6).
  • The Cold Call participation strategy is introduced in Work Time A. This is a total participation technique in which students are randomly called on by the teacher.  A kind, supportive, and caring environment in which students are open to taking risks supports the success of this strategy. This is one of many total participation techniques that will be rolled out in this module.
  • Students use ideas from What Does School Mean to You? to add to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart, which is reread, referenced, and added to across the unit during each focused read-aloud. Students also refer to the anchor chart in Units 2 and 3.
  • In Work Time B, students reflect on their learning from the focused read-aloud using their What Is School? notebook. As students continue to learn and develop new ideas about school, the notebook serves as a place to capture their thoughts and as a reminder of the evolution of their thinking.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lesson 1, students were introduced to the norm “listen with care.” They practiced this norm in Lesson 2. In this lesson, they learn a new discussion norm, “speak one at a time.”
  • This lesson follows the same basic pattern as the previous lesson. Students should engage with the text in a focused read-aloud, process their thinking through independent writing, and then apply their ideas by looking for evidence in the classroom.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In the Opening, students are introduced to a new discussion norm. To help them better understand the concept, consider including a signal or a prop to hold to help students identify the one speaker.
  • In Work Time B, students independently work in their What Is School? notebook. To ensure that all students are able to write their ideas down, encourage them to use the Module Guiding Question anchor chart to help them spell words. Also encourage them to add details to their drawing if writing is difficult or frustrating.
  • In Work Time C, students take a “tour” of the classroom to find evidence of how school is important. They may be unsure about what evidence would match their thinking about why school is important. Encourage students to work with a buddy or give them an example of something to look for during the tour.

Down the road:

  • This is the second of two lessons with opportunities to collect data on students’ progress toward RI.2.1 and RI.2.6 through the focused read-aloud.
  • In the Closing, students respond to the kindergarteners with ideas about school. In future units, students will consider what other information they can give the kindergarteners before celebrating their learning in person with a kindergarten class on the final day of the module.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, by writing the first bullet.
    • The beginning of the kindergarten letter by writing “Dear Kindergarteners,” at the top of a piece of chart paper.
  • Set up a document camera to display What Does School Mean to You? and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Distribute pencils and the What Is School? notebook at students’ workspaces. Doing this in advance helps ensure a smooth transition during Work Time B.
  • Review the Think-Pair-Share protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, and the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Record students as practice their discussion norms to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the whole group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time B:  Students complete the What is School? notebooks using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc.
  • Work Time C: Students take pictures on the tour using devices. Post on a teacher webpage, class blog, or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to talk about at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free camera apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Complete the shared writing using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc., or write an email.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.A.1, 2.I.B.6, and 2.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with the opportunity to read closely and discuss complex text. It also supports ELLs through explicit instruction in discussion conventions.
  • Some ELLs may find some of the language in What Does School Mean to You? challenging. This is also the first text they will read aloud as a class. Empower students to display an agreed-upon motion or signal if they need to slow down or need clarification.
  • Explain the purpose and goals of Conversation Cues to students and that they should listen closely for them, as they will respond to Conversation Cues throughout this curriculum.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Opening A and During Work Time B, where there are opportunities for students to help explain or model an activity for the class, invite an intermediate or advanced proficiency ELL to volunteer to do so.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time B, distribute a partially filled-in copy of page 3 of the What Is School? notebook. This provides students with models for the kind of writing expected and reduces the volume of writing required.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing and Assessment, students will help you add to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart. You can provide options for comprehension by adding a scanned image of Vashti to illustrate “believing in yourself.”
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time B, students write independently. Vary methods for fine motor response by offering options for drawing utensils, writing tools, and scaffolds.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Before students choose a character to act out in the Role Play protocol, support them in managing frustration by prompting them to discuss strategies for what to do if their partner selects their preferred character. 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • norms, high-quality work (L)

Review:

  • key details (L)

Materials

  • Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart (new; co-created with students during the Opening; see Teaching Notes)
  • What Does School Mean to You? (from Lesson 2; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Module Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Module Guiding Question anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference, see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • What Is School? notebook (from Lesson 1; page 3; one per student and one to display)
  • Letter to kindergarteners (new; co-created with students during the Closing; see supporting materials)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Establishing a Discussion Norm: Speak One at a Time (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Display the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart and read the title aloud.
  • Explain that norms are things that are expected every day; they are just the normal behavior and actions from the class. So, this chart will help students remember how they should normally act and behave when they have discussions with one another.
  • Point to the first bullet and select a volunteer to read it aloud:
    • “Listen with care.”
  • Tell students that they have already begun practicing one of the classroom discussion norms.
  • Ask:

“When you are talking with your friends, what is something that makes it hard to hear them?” (They are talking too fast; they are talking too quietly; there are too many people talking at once.)

  • Tell students that all of their ideas are important, but listening to everybody at once makes it hard to hear all the good ideas.
  • Ask:

“What discussion norm can help us hear each important idea in the classroom?” (speak one at a time)

  • Write the second bullet on the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart:
    • “Speak one at a time.”
  • Invite students to point to the part of their body they use when speaking. (mouth)
  • Invite students to point to the parts of their body they use when they are not speaking. (their eyes, ears)
  • Remind students that the first discussion norm, listen with care, is what they should do if they are not the one speaking.
  • Tell students they are now going to practice these two discussion norms. Move them into a circle and tell them that they are going to share their favorite part of school one by one. Remind students that their job is to speak one at a time and to listen with care.
  • Choose one student to begin sharing his or her favorite part of school. Quickly go around the circle until you have heard from each student. In between students, offer specific, positive feedback for behaviors that demonstrate the discussion norms. (Example: “I notice Jordan listening to each speaker using eye contact.”)
  • For ELLs: Invite students to model listening with care in front of the class. Ask students what they notice about what the students are doing. (Example: “What did you notice about what Hector was doing as he was listening?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 2: What Does School Mean to You? (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can ask and answer questions about what school is and why it is important using key details from What Does School Mean to You?”

  • Display What Does School Mean to You?
  • Remind students that yesterday they listened to the text read aloud and answered questions about key details in the text. Remind them that key details are the small, important details in the text that, when put together, help us come to a better understanding about what the text is trying to say.
  • Focus students on the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner.
  • Tell students you are going to hear from some students using Cold Call. Explain that cold calling means that you will choose a couple of students to share their thinking.
  •  Cold Call 2-3 students to share with the group:

“What is something we learned about school from our text yesterday?” (School helps us learn new things and treat others well.)

  • Invite students to put on their wings again so they can travel around the world to hear new ideas from other people. Invite them to spread their arms out like wings and pretend they are flying.
  • Invite students to land themselves back into their seats.
  • Challenge students to listen for new ideas about why school is important as the book is reread.
  • While still displaying the text, begin reading aloud on page 11 that begins with “Michelle says.…”
  • Stop reading after page 12 “Jonathan says.…”
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner,

“What makes school important to Jonathan?” (working, learning, playing together)

  • Cold call a few students to share out.
  • Say: “It sounds like relationships are a really important part of school. Other people can be really important to help us grow. I wonder if we can be important to other people too? Let’s keep reading.”
  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read page 13 that begins with “Christopher says.…”
  • Invite students to listen to Christopher’s quote once more, then invite them to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“Why is school important to Christopher?” (He learns habits from school that he can use in the real world; he can help other people.)

  • Encourage students to show a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down for the following question:

“Do you think school is important because you can learn to help people?”

  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and continue reading page 14 that begins with “Lisa says.…”
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner. Circulate to support students and use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to gather data on students’ progress toward SL.2.1. Then select volunteers to share with the group:

“What did Lisa say the third-grade class did? Why was it important?” (The third-grade class created scavenger hunt booklets and donated them to the zoo. That helps the zoo teach its visitors.)

  • Ask:

“What is the same about Christopher’s idea and Lisa’s idea?” (They are both about learning to help others.)

  • To support students’ thinking, rephrase each of the previous quotes: “Christopher was saying he learned to be nice and that will help him be nice to people on the street, and Lisa said they made books to donate and they helped zoo visitors learn.”
  • Say:

“It sounds like there might be something very important about school here! Let’s read one more quote and see if we can think of something to add to our chart about why school is important.”

  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read page 19 that begins with “Chris says.…”
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner, then select volunteers to share with the group:

“What did Chris say his class did? Why was it important?” (The class planted flowers; the flowers will give clean air to the environment.)

  • Ask:

“Think about what Christopher, Lisa, and Chris said in their quote. Why is school important?”

  • To support students’ thinking, rephrase each of the previous quotes: “Christopher said he learned to be nice and that will help him be nice to people on the street, Lisa said they made books to donate and they helped zoo visitors learn, and Chris said they planted flowers and helped keep the air clean.”
  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to expand the conversation about why school is important:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Say:

“Wow. It sounds like you are saying that school is important because you use what you learn to make your classroom, school, and community a better place. Let’s add that to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.”

  • Add the following bullet in the column next to “foster character and relationships” on the Module Guiding Question anchor chart. Refer to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • “Use what you are learning to make your classroom, school, and community a better place”
  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read the page that begins “Trinity says.…”
  • Continue reading until “Jack says....”
  • Focus students on the Module Guiding Question anchor chart and reread the categories. Invite students to use a whisper response:

“What did Jack mention that is also on our chart?” (high-quality work)

  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner, then select volunteers to share with the group:

“What does Jack think high-quality work is?” (work that shows extra effort, doing more than asked)

  • Define high-quality work as work that someone has put a lot of effort into to make it the best it can be.
  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read to the end of the book.
  • Ask:

“Why do we need to create high-quality work?”

  • To support students’ thinking, rephrase each of the previous quotes: “Jack said that creating high-quality work helps us in life, and Chris said high-quality work helps me see that I can make a difference.”
  • Select volunteers to share their thinking with the group.
  • If productive, use a Goal 1 Conversation Cue to encourage students to expand the conversation about high-quality work:

“Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Say:

“Your ideas are making me think we should add something to the high-quality part of the chart. It sounds like creating beautiful and careful work is important.”

  • Add the following bullet in the column next to “create high-quality work” on the Module Guiding Question anchor chart. Refer to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
    • “Create beautiful and careful work”
  • Give students an air hug or air high-five for all of their work thinking about why school is important.
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by asking students to summarize and then to personalize the learning targets. Invite them to paraphrase the targets and then say how they feel about them. Ask:

“Can you put the first learning target in your own words?” (I can ask questions about What Does School Mean to You?)

“How do you feel about that target?” (I am excited because I like the book.) (MMAE)

  • For ELLs: During the focused read-aloud, provide sentence frames for Think-Pair-Shares. (Example: “School is important to Christopher because he learns______.”) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During the focused read-aloud, display the text on a document camera or display an enlarged copy of the text to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: “Place your finger on the sentence: “It helps students see themselves as experts with a voice and the power to make a difference.”

“What does this sentence mean?” (Responses will vary.)

  •  Place your finger on the chunk: “It helps students see themselves as experts” and invite students to do the same. Ask:

“What is it in this chunk?” (Doing high-quality work).

  • Reread the chunk, replacing it with the phrase doing high-quality work.

“What does it mean for students like you to see yourselves?” (to look at my own face or body; to look in a mirror)

“So what does it mean to see yourself as experts?” (to think about ourselves as people that know a lot about something.)

  • Place your finger on the chunk: “with a voice and the power to make a difference.” and invite students to do the same.
  • Circulate to support students and to use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to gather data on students’ progress toward standards.
  • Say:

“The word with here means that we are about to see more qualities that we have as experts.”

  • Ask:

“What else do we have as experts? What is a voice? What do you think having a voice means in this sentence?” (A voice is what we hear when we speak. Having a voice means having an opinion and ideas that matter.)

 “What is that last thing that experts have? What does it mean?” (The power to make a difference; to be able to change things or make our communities better.)

“What are some ways you can make a difference in your community if you are experts?” (Responses will vary.)

“How would doing high-quality work help you make a difference in your community?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Read the sentence in its entirety. Ask:

“Now what do you think this sentence means?” (Responses will vary, but may include: Doing good work helps us understand how we can change things. Working hard will help us become experts.)

“What key details in the sentence help us understand how school is important?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Before students choose a character to act out in the Role Play protocol, support them in managing frustration by prompting them to discuss strategies for what to do if their partner selects their preferred character. (Example: “You and your partner may both want to be the same character. What can you do if your partner picks the character you want to be?”) (MME)

B. Independent Writing: What Is School? Notebook (10 minutes)

  • Open to page 3 of the What Is School? notebook and focus students on the question:
    • “What did you learn from the book about what school is and why schools are important?”
  • Model and think aloud the process for answering this question. Say: “I remember we talked about school being important because I can use what I learn to help people in my class, my school, or my community.”
  • Invite students to whisper into their hand something they have learned from the book about what school is and why schools are important.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What did you learn from the book about what school is and why schools are important? What picture would you draw?” (I learned that you can learn new things at school to make your community a better place; a picture of me planting flowers.)

  • Tell students that their notebooks are already at their workspaces.
  • Remind students how to transition back to their seats for independent work:
  1.  Walk quietly, quickly, and safely to your seat.
  2. Sit in your chair.
  3. Get a pencil from the bin and begin working right away.
  • Invite one or two students to use their wings to model flying safely, quietly, and quickly back to their seats.
  • Invite all students to use their wings to fly back to their seats and begin working.
  • Circulate and support students as they write. Give frequent time reminders and encouragement. Prompt students with reminders to use the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.
  • Give students a 1-minute warning before their writing and drawing time is done.
  • For ELLs: Display sentence frames to support students’ writing as they complete their notebooks. (Example: “I learned that school is important because ______.”) (MMAE)
  • Facilitate students’ self-regulation skills before they act out Vashti’s feelings by modeling how to manage feelings of excitement or silliness during this activity. Example: “Sometimes when I am making faces, it can make me feel a little silly. It’s okay that I feel that way, but I need to remember that we are acting out Vashti’s facial expressions to help us understand the book. If I get too silly, it might be hard for my classmates and me to understand the story. What are some strategies I can use if I start to feel silly during this activity?” (give myself a hug, press my palms together, take a deep breath) (MME)
  • When introducing the independent writing task, foster collaboration and community by providing prompts that guide students in knowing when and how to ask classmates or teachers for help. (Example: “While you are writing today, you might forget what the writing directions are in your notebook. That is okay! First, try your best to sound out the words in the question. If you are still stuck, there are many people in the room to help you. You can ask a classmate or raise your hand for a teacher to help you read the directions.”) (MME) 

C. Making Observations: Evidence in Our Classroom (15 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Tell students that similar to the previous lesson, they will now go on a slow, silent tour of their classroom to see if they can find evidence (or clues). They will be looking for tools, work, signs, posters, books, or anything that can prove that their school does the important things they have learned about.
  • Model by telling the kids you have written that school is important because your learning can help others. Walk slowly around the room, thinking aloud about the evidence in the room that proves school helps kids learn to treat each other nicely. (Example: “I see a pencil sharpener that really doesn’t help us help others, but I do see a poster of our learning about preventing bullying {other examples: Word Wall definitions, completed project from an expedition, completed beautiful classwork}. I think that will be my evidence for how we learn to help others.”)
  • Tell students they will move around the edges of the room so that everyone can see.
  • Invite students to take their pencil and What Is School? notebook and stand in a line on one side of the classroom. Lead the students on a slow walk around the perimeter.
  • Encourage students to stop and jot in their notebook when they have found evidence in the room.
  • After walking a complete circle of the classroom, lead students to the whole group area.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can speak one at a time when participating in conversations with my classmates.”

  • Remind students that they practiced listening with care and speaking one at a time at the beginning of this lesson.
  • Tell students they will now listen with care as they share the evidence they saw in the classroom with a partner. Invite students to turn to an elbow partner and label themselves A and B.
  • Invite partner B to share with partner A the evidence he or she found in the classroom that shows why schools are important.
  • After 30 seconds, invite students to switch roles.
  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback for their ability to listen with care and speak one at a time while sharing with their partners. (Example: “I noticed Alex listened until it was his time to speak.”)
  • For ELLs: Invite students to recall and explain the same activity from the prior lesson. If necessary, model and think-aloud the process of finding evidence and jotting down a note. (Example: “Oh, I just saw a trash can and it reminds me of how we clean up in school. I’m going to sketch a trash can now.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Shared Writing: Responding to Kindergarteners (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to show with their arms how much they know about school.
  • Ask:

“Are there any students in our school who are just beginning to learn about why school is important?” (new students, kindergarteners)

“Do you think there is a way to share our learning with these students?” (a letter)

  • Remind students how to begin a letter by showing them the chart paper (letter to kindergartners) with “Dear Kindergarteners,” at the top.
  • Explain that kindergarteners might need to hear new ideas in short and simple sentences so they can understand them.
  • Model writing the first two sentences as short and simple sentences:
    • “In second grade, we are learning about why school is important.”
    • “We would like to share our learning with you!”
  • Tell students they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in the previous lesson and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol using the question:
    • “What should we share with kindergarteners about what school is and why it is important?”
  • Circulate to support students’ thinking by directing them to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart or by rereading quotes from What Does School Mean to You? To prepare students with concise ideas to share whole group, try rephrasing their ideas back to them by saying: “So Manny, are you saying …?”
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Invite volunteers to offer ideas in short and simple sentences to include in the letter.
  • Add four or five sentences to the letter using student ideas.
  • Write a concluding sentence and a closing. (Example: “We hope to learn more to share with you soon! Sincerely, Second Graders”)
  • Invite students to come up one by one to sign the bottom of the letter.
  • For ELLs: Some students may be unfamiliar with the concept and format of a letter in English. Display a model of a completed letter to provide context for the activity. (Example: “This is a letter. We’re going to write something together that will look just like this when we are done!”)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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