Speaking and Listening: Preparing for the End of Module Celebration | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M2:U3:L12

Speaking and Listening: Preparing for the End of Module Celebration

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.1.4: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • SL.1.6: Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation.
  • L.1.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can present information about the sun, moon, and stars to others. (SL.1.4, SL.1.6, L.1.6)
  • I can read my writing aloud using a strong and clear voice. (SL.1.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Times A and B, circulate and observe students’ progress toward SL.1.4 and SL.1.6 as they practice sharing what they’ve learned using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Ways We Share Our Work Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Preparing to Present: Selecting Information from Our Sky Notebooks to Share (15 minutes)

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Discussing Patterns in the Sky (15 minutes)

C. Pinky Partners: Sharing Our Work (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Engaging the Learner: Revisiting "Sun" and "Moon" Songs (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • During this lesson, students prepare for the end of module celebration by rehearsing several entries from the Sky notebooks, information about patterns in the sky, and their “What the Sun Sees” poems. Practicing sharing with a peer or small group before sharing with visitors provides a safe, low-risk environment for students as they build oral language and presentation skills (SL.1.4 and SL.1.6).
  • As time permits in Work Time A, use the High-Quality Work anchor chart to prompt students to select entries from their Sky notebooks that include descriptive, detailed, and neat writing and pictures.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • During this lesson, students practice sharing learning that has occurred throughout all three units.
  • As students prepare to present to classroom visitors during the end of module celebration, they revisit the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart, first introduced in Module 1, Unit 3.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may feel uncomfortable or lack necessary oral language and presentation skills as they share their writing with a partner. Consider strategically pairing students to provide extra support and encouragement for those who need it.
  • Some students may have difficulty recalling information from previous units as they practice answering questions during Work Time B. Prompt those students to use resources around the room, such as the Patterns of the Sun anchor chart, Patterns of the Moon anchor chart, Patterns of the Stars anchor chart, and What Makes Day and Night? anchor chart.

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 13, students will share learning from all three units during the end of module celebration.

In Advance

  • Distribute:
    • Materials (Sky notebook and sticky notes) for Work Time A at student workspaces.
    • Materials (“What the Sun Sees” poem) for Work Time C at student workspaces.
  • Post: Learning targets, “Sun” song, “Moon” song, Moon, and Stars” song, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Create the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills. If you recorded students participating in the Moon Movement routine in Unit 1, play this video to remind them of what to do.
  • Work Time B: Video-record students as they participate in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to watch with them as they prepare for the end of module celebration. Post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to watch at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time C: Video-record students as they practice sharing their “What the Sun Sees” poems to watch with them to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post it on a teacher web page or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to watch at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.C.9 and 1.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the opportunity to build their oral language and presentation skills in a structured way, and through the opportunity to practice sharing with a peer or small group before the end of module celebration in Lesson 13.
  • ELLs may find it challenging or intimidating to speak in front of an audience. Consider offering choice in terms of what group they will be presenting with and/or which order they will present in.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Consider looking at the notes you took during the Module 1 assessment regarding areas in which students struggled with oral presentations, such as projecting their voices or enunciating their words, to help students practice for their presentations.

For heavier support:

  • Allow time to rehearse reading their entries from the Sky notebooks, their information about patterns in the sky, and their “What the Sun Sees” poems. Practicing sharing with a peer or small group before sharing with visitor(s) provides a safe, low-risk environment for students as they build oral language and presentation skills.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In Work Time B, students discuss patterns of the sun, moon, and stars. Reduce barriers to metacognition as students share by providing a visual reminder of the focus for what they are sharing during the protocol. (Example: Display the question on chart paper or sentence strip, or offer an index card with the questions to individual students: 1) What is a pattern that the sun, moon, or stars follows? How would you describe that pattern? 2) What is something you learned about the sun, moon, or stars that you did not know before? 3) What do you still wonder about the sun, moon, or stars? 4) What did you learn about how writers use their knowledge and observations to write a story?)
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During this lesson, some students may benefit from sensory input and opportunities for movement while they are sitting. Provide options for differentiated seating (e.g., sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs). In addition, consider providing options for physical action by inviting students to join you in a quick movement break if they seem restless during the lesson.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Throughout this lesson, students have opportunities to share ideas and thinking with classmates. Some may need support for engagement during these activities, so encourage self-regulatory skills by helping them anticipate and manage frustration by modeling what to do if they need help from their classmates. (Example: “I can remember when I’m sharing that if I forget my idea or need help, I can ask my partner to help me. My partner could help me by giving me prompts that will help me share my thinking.”) Offering these supports for engagement promotes a safe learning space for all students.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

N/A

Materials

  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Sky notebook (from Unit 2, Lesson 4; answers, for teacher reference; one to display)
  • Sky notebooks (completed in Unit 2; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (two per student)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Equity sticks (class set; one per student)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • “What the Sun Sees” poem (completed in Lesson 11; one per student)
  •  “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song (from Unit 1, Lesson 3; one to display)
  • “Moon” song (from Unit 1, Lesson 8; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Ways We Share Our Work Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Tell students that they have done a lot of hard work during this module. In the next lesson, they will have visitors to the classroom for the end of module celebration. These visitors will be very excited and interested to learn about the sun, moon, and stars, and it is the students’ job to teach them!
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • "I can present information about the sun, moon, and stars to others.”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What work have you done during this module that you could share with visitors so that they learn about the sun, moon, and stars?” (Sky notebook, “What the Sun Sees” poem)

  • Set purpose for the end of module celebration. Tell students that during the celebration, they will share their narrative poems and Sky notebooks and will answer questions about the sun, moon, and stars.
  • Remind students that at the end of Module 1, they had a celebration in which they shared their Most Magnificent creations with visitors and presented about the habits of character. Remind them that while they presented and shared, it was important to follow certain guidelines so that their visitors understood and learned from them.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart and briefly review it by reading it aloud, inviting students to echo you:
    • “Use a loud and proud voice.” (Students echo this description using a loud, proud voice.)
    • “Say our words clearly so others can understand them.” (Students echo, saying the words clearly.)
    • “Use a complete sentence.” (Students echo, saying, “I can use a complete sentence.”)
  • Inform students that because the visitors are so excited to learn about the sun, moon, and stars from them, it is important that the students practice presenting their narrative poems and Sky notebooks and answering the questions the visitors will ask them.
  • For students who may need additional support with oral language and processing: Allow ample wait time as students prepare to share their thinking. (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by speaking in front of others. Invite a volunteer to read the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart during the end of module celebration. Consider sending home a copy of the chart for the student to practice reading it with a loud and proud voice, saying words clearly so that others can understand them.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Preparing to Present: Selecting Information from Our Sky Notebooks to Share (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to safely and respectfully mimic with their hands and arms something the sun, moon, or stars would do (e.g., rise and set, twinkle, shine brightly) as they return to their seats.
  • Tell students that they will now review their Sky notebooks and pick two entries to share with the visitors.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What should you keep in mind while you are selecting entries from your Sky notebook to share? What criteria should those entries meet?” (neat writing, accurate information, entries that show different information and times of day)

  • While displaying the Sky notebook (answers for teacher reference), think aloud as you select an entry and model marking it with a sticky note:
  1. Turn to page 4 in the Sky notebook (answers, for teacher reference) and read it aloud.
  2. Think aloud as you reflect on the quality of information and writing included on this page. (Example: “This entry is about the sun at noontime. I drew a really detailed picture and picked two adjectives to describe what the sun looks like.)
  3. Using a sticky note, mark the page as you say, “This entry includes detailed and neat writing, so I will share it during the celebration.”
  • Direct students’ attention to the Sky notebooks and sticky notes in their workspaces.
  • Tell students they will use the sticky notes to mark the two entries they will share with visitors during the end of module celebration.
  • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin reviewing their Sky notebooks and using the sticky notes to mark their selected pages.
  • Circulate as students review their notebooks, prompting them to select entries with show neat writing, accurate information, and different times of day.
  • When 2 minutes remain, signal to students to begin cleaning up by closing their Sky notebooks and placing them back in the center of their workspaces.
  • To support self-regulation and independence during a transition: Provide a clear routine for what will happen as this activity concludes and use a visual time timer. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Students can feel less intimidated about speaking in front of an audience during the end of module celebration if they know that they will not be presenting to a big audience. Share with them that they will gather in small presentation groups with only a few other classmates and one or two visitors, and that they will take turns sharing their Sky notebooks.
  • For ELLs: Some students might be worried about who the visitors are. Consider telling students who is invited (the principal, families, community members, and other teachers and their classes).
  • For ELLs: Some students might need help selecting the entries from their Sky notebook. Consider using the High-Quality Work anchor chart to prompt students to select entries from their Sky notebooks that include descriptive, detailed, and neat writing and pictures.

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Discussing Patterns in the Sky (15 minutes)

  • Invite students back to the whole group area and offer them specific, positive feedback on their work selecting entries from their Sky notebooks. (Example: “I noticed that everyone reviewed their work closely to select the entries that had the most details to describe the sun or moon.”)
  • Remind students that their Sky notebook entries are just one piece of what they will share tomorrow.
  • Tell students that the visitors will ask them a few questions about the sun, moon, and stars and that they will now practice answering those questions with a partner.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to discuss the answers to questions about the sun, moon, and stars and what they have learned. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through four rounds of the protocol using the following questions:

“What is a pattern that the sun, moon, or stars follow? How would you describe that pattern?”

“What is something you learned about the sun, moon, or stars that you did not know before?”

“What do you still wonder about the sun, moon, or stars?”

“What did you learn about the Unit 3 guiding question: How do writers use their knowledge and observations to write a story?”

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas they are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group.  Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress towards the targeted standards.
  • Invite students to be seated again.
  • Invite a few students to share out what they discussed with their partners during the protocol.
  • Refocus students whole group. With excitement, remind them that they have a lot of information about the sun, moon, and stars and the patterns they follow to share with visitors during the celebration.
  • During the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, increase mastery-oriented feedback by providing feedback that is frequent, timely, and specific to individual pairs of students. (Example: “I hear that you clearly shared a pattern that the sun follows. Can you share something that you still wonder about the pattern of the sun?”) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider having students who need heavier support choose which questions they want to answer beforehand, so they can practice their answers and build confidence. Be sure to let the visitors know of this accommodation, so they know which questions to ask those particular students.

C. Pinky Partners: Sharing Our Work (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that they have one more piece of work to share with their visitors: their “What the Sun Sees” poems.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can read my writing aloud using a strong and clear voice.”

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“When you are sharing your poems, what is important to remember to do so that your visitors can learn from you?” (speak clearly and loudly, make eye contact with visitors, listen as others share)

  • Tell students that they will now practice sharing their poems with a partner so that they are prepared to share them when the visitors come.
  • Tell students they will use the Pinky Partners protocol to practice sharing their poems. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Distribute students’ “What the Sun Sees” poems.
  • Invite students to begin the Pinky Partners protocol.
  • Circulate as students share, directing students’ attention to the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart as necessary and making note of progress toward SL.1.4 and SL.1.6 using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • When 3 minutes remain, invite students to be seated. Collect their “What the Sun Sees” poems.
  • Generate excitement by inviting students to turn to an elbow partner and talk:

“What part of your poem are you most proud and most excited to share with a visitor?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus students whole group and invite a few students to share out.
  • To support communication and engagement, pair students with strategic partners to ensure they have a strong, helpful partner to support their efforts at sharing what is important to remember so visitors can learn from them. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider pairing students with a buddy for support as they read their “What the Sun Sees” poems.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Revisiting “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Song (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that in addition to sharing their Sky notebooks and “What the Sun Sees” poems with visitors, they will also share the “Sun” song and “Moon” song they had practiced and learned during Unit 1.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song.
  • Invite students to join you as you sing the song and complete the accompanying hand motions.
  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How did our work in this unit add to your understanding of how writers use their knowledge and observations to write a story? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to be seated and offer specific, positive feedback on all that they did during today’s lesson to prepare for the celebration in the next lesson. (Example: “When we sing for the visitors, we want to make sure we are looking at the audience so they can hear the songs clearly.”)
  • Remind students that in the next lesson, they are going to get to share all of their hard work and learning. 
  • For ELLs: Some students may benefit from building their confidence by practicing speaking in front of others. Consider choosing a student to be in charge of introducing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song that will be sung and inviting the rest of the students to stand up to sing them. Write a short script of what students will want to say tomorrow during the end of module celebration. Consider sending home a copy of the script for students to practice reading with a loud and proud voice, saying words clearly so that others can understand them.

There are no new supporting materials for this lesson.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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